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Thread: Agricultural Goods

  1. #1
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    Default Agricultural Goods

    Anybody have experience with export of agricultural commodities from DR?

    Specifically in the case of sugar or cocoa, how does one obtain legal asssignment to a lender so that he could be collateralized?

  2. #2
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    Default big Bi$ne$$

    you can make a start in exporting'veg/fruits etc. but i dont think anyone is going to do what you want to do... start small...Just like anything else... first time hurts
    I have contacts in the exporting of veg. I also think there is room for fruit and veg exporting....
    Try a small shipment.... ask alot of questions...

  3. #3
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    Thats fine. When it gets to the point of the actual ag. goods being held as collateral, you are already talking big $$$.

    I want to make contacts with vegetable/fruit buyers in the NY/NJ area, thats where I am now. Sugar, cocoa or coffee can go anywhere.

  4. #4
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    You are going to run up against major obstacles. Most cacao, except organic is already spoken for even before the harvest. There is a national cacao organization that you might contact.
    Coffee is like hen's teeth, with falling production in many places.

    You would be better off looking for other ag products.

    HB

  5. #5
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    There are intermediaries who broker deals on commodities and they usually use something called a Letter of Credit for moving the money. I once helped broker a deal for a million pounds of sugar in Estonia and it is not exactly like stopping by WalMart for some new socks-- it took two months for the first deal and there was a lot of contract negotiation and consulting a lawyer at $400/hour.

    They wouldn't lend money for sugar since they are dealing with very large amounts of product. A typical sugar cargo ship can haul 13,000 tons of sugar and a 20' shipping container would be about 20 tons. 20 tons is a miniscual amount in the sugar business. With cocoa, there are many variables and they normally export pods to be processed.

    With a tiny amount of sugar, the shipping could more than the cost of the sugar.

  6. #6
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    RossW here is an exporter of fruits and vegetables for Indian cooking so if you can find markets for these goods you would have a supplier pretty handy. I don't know what 80% of the stuff he sells is but he seems to have a pretty diverse product line.

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