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Thread: US Immigration Services through Guzmán Ariza

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by avi8or57 View Post
    I'm a US citizen (retired NYC Police Officer) legally married to a Dominican woman and I have a beautiful daughter together with same. We have been married six years now, and I'd like to take my wife and daughter to the States on a B-2 (Tourist Visa). My wife has never left the country before and my daughter has her US Passport and Certificate of Birth Abroad from the US Consulate in SD. I just opened a bank account in my wife's name and she is not employed, I support her totally. We have no intention of staying in the US, so is the process complicated or can I go it alone without a lawyer? I heard that lawyers can no longer accompany applicants at the US Consulate office for interviews, is this true? Can you help me with this?
    Sorry to tell you, but you are wasting your time. She will not get a tourist visa. The Consulate will take into consideration that you are married and have a child in common. Their thinking is that once they are in the US, they will not leave and live with you. Apply for residence visas for them. The process is running about 10 months for a CR-1. If your relationship is legit, they will get them no sweat. If not, do you plan to retire to DR? How much time do you have left?

  2. #12
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    Thank you Mr. Hernandez for the wealth of information and advice you posted, truly appreciated!

  3. #13
    Guzman Ariza/Malcolm Cisneros
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    Quote Originally Posted by avi8or57 View Post
    Thank you Mr. Hernandez for the wealth of information and advice you posted, truly appreciated!
    It is my pleasure...

    I hope you don't mind me sharing this quote with you...

    "Many of life's failures are people who DID NOT realize how close they were to success when they gave up." ---Thomas Alva Edison

    Have a wonderful day!

    M. Hernandez, Esq.

  4. #14
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    Default No chance to get a visitor's visa for a Dominican Spouse by applying directly for one

    Quote Originally Posted by avi8or57 View Post
    I'm a US citizen (retired NYC Police Officer) legally married to a Dominican woman and I have a beautiful daughter together with same. We have been married six years now, and I'd like to take my wife and daughter to the States on a B-2 (Tourist Visa). My wife has never left the country before and my daughter has her US Passport and Certificate of Birth Abroad from the US Consulate in SD. I just opened a bank account in my wife's name and she is not employed, I support her totally. We have no intention of staying in the US, so is the process complicated or can I go it alone without a lawyer? I heard that lawyers can no longer accompany applicants at the US Consulate office for interviews, is this true? Can you help me with this?
    I know from personal experience that you will have no chance of getting a visitor's visa to the US for your wife. You can apply as many times as you want and you will be refused.

    That said, there is only one way that I am aware of where you can get visitor's visas for a spouse and their under 18 year old Dominican children and it is ugly. You have to apply for residency for them in the US. Once residency is granted they can trade the residency in for 10 year renewable visitor's visas in Santo Domingo. I know of this "round about" method of getting a visitor's visa for my wife from first hand experience as well. I did all of the paperwork myself. It is not difficult, just tedious.

  5. #15
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    This is simply a story from someone I have met. He is an American living in the outskirts of Santiago who claims that his Dominican wife was given a visitor visa when he had to return to the US because his son (from a previous marriage) was dying. They traveled together and stayed there until after the funeral (from what I understand, the son was in Hospice).

    Perhaps the visa was given because of the situation, I don't really know.

  6. #16
    Guzman Ariza/Malcolm Cisneros
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    Thank you all for sharing your views and experiences on this specific situation. However, let us now focus on the actual regulations that are to be followed by Consular Officers, as they pertain to B-2 Visitor visas for spouses of U.S. citizens.

    SPOUSE OR CHILD OF U.S. CITIZEN OR RESIDENT ALIEN --U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE FOREIGN AFFAIRS MANUAL (9 FAM 41.31 N14.3)

    "An alien spouse or child, including an adopted alien child, of a U.S. citizen or resident alien MAY be classified as a nonimmigrant B-2 visitor if the purpose of the travel is to accompany or follow to join the spouse or parent for a TEMPORARY visit."

    Based on these regulations, if you are able to prove that your wife & your ties to the DR are strong and that your visit to the US is temporary...you may have a possibility to obtain a B-2 visa for your wife. Kindly note that the operative word continues being, "MAY". As previously stated...these visas are discretionary...

    Please post any other questions/comments or concerns that you may have.

    Maria D. Hernandez, Esq.

  7. #17
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    Default To Call Themselves,"The US Immigration "SERVICE" Is RIDICULOUS !!!!!!!!

    It has been my experience,as a native born citizen of the United States of America,over the past 20 years,that "they" should call themselves, The US Department of Immigration "DIS"-Service!!!!

    The problem is the entry level officers who don't seem to like Dominicans very much.They also don't seem to like the fact that many couples who apply are not of the same ethnic group and ,therefore,their children are "Bi-Racial".
    I have seen it too many times for it to be,"Just ME"!

    I know why they sit behind 3 inch bullet proof glass!
    I would VERY Definitely use the services of an Immigration Law office.That way
    ,when you appeal/complain about why you were turned down/ treated,you will have a well documented "Paper Trail" to present,showing that you did everything,"By-The-Book",and were still turned down.

    I have lived in several countries,all around the World.I often wonder what purpose the embassies/consuls serve??? The don't seem to be there to benefit it's own citizen when they need help.Must be just another way to inflate the size of government,and reward big donors with great jobs living LARGE in foreign countries.In the DR,the Americans who work in the consul recieve
    Hardship" pay.If the DR is such a "Hardship" post,how come so many tourists from around the Globe spend thousands of dollars to come here for a week or two of"R&R" ????????????????

    Makes ya wanna go,"HHUUUUUUMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM?"

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  8. Likes gringostudent, M.Hernandez, SKing, 2dlight liked this post
  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank the Tank View Post
    Sorry to tell you, but you are wasting your time. She will not get a tourist visa. The Consulate will take into consideration that you are married and have a child in common. Their thinking is that once they are in the US, they will not leave and live with you. Apply for residence visas for them. The process is running about 10 months for a CR-1. If your relationship is legit, they will get them no sweat. If not, do you plan to retire to DR? How much time do you have left?
    As Frank says the Consulate will deny the visitor visa and tell you your wife needs to get an immigrant visa (green card). Once you have paid the exorbitant fees to acquire the immigrant visa the Customs and Border Protection agents will diligently protect the U.S. border by giving your wife a lot of sh*t every time she tries to enter the country because she has chosen to spend more of her time in the Dominican Republic than in the home of the brave. I predict you will soon come to despise the State Department.

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  11. #19
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    Default The Word "DESPISE" Doesn't Come CLOSE!!!!!!

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  12. #20
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    Kudos to the State Department, they came thru for little ole me just when I needed a hand from my wonderful American government, I am happy I paid all my due taxes all these years.

    Without going into detail, the Consulate needed to petition the US state Department on my behalf to do something completely contrary to US Immigration Law, issue a second US passport although the original was not lost, stolen or expired, and they approved it with flying colors, with almost no delay, thank you very much.

    Sorry about the immigration issues for everybody though, but they really are good people!!!

    g'luck

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