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Thread: Entering DR with a criminal record

  1. #21
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    Well,,, he saved you money, a good attorney by any standards, lol

  2. #22
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    Do DR immigration officers even have computers at their stations to even check your passport? I didn't notice last time I was there.

    You should have no problems getting in or out of DR. You should worry about US BP who will see your conviction and will probably do an extra search of your bags seeing as you are coming from DR. I used to work at an airline in JFK and one of my passengers got arrested coming back from a trip to Asia with a group of friends. He had a warrant he was unaware of from an incident 20 years before he thought he had settled. This man was a doctor in his 60s and they led him out in handcuffs in front of his hysterical wife and friends.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SubterraneanHomesickAlien View Post
    Do DR immigration officers even have computers at their stations to even check your passport? I didn't notice last time I was there.

    You should have no problems getting in or out of DR. You should worry about US BP who will see your conviction and will probably do an extra search of your bags seeing as you are coming from DR. I used to work at an airline in JFK and one of my passengers got arrested coming back from a trip to Asia with a group of friends. He had a warrant he was unaware of from an incident 20 years before he thought he had settled. This man was a doctor in his 60s and they led him out in handcuffs in front of his hysterical wife and friends.
    Yes they do! When was the last time you were there?

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ezequiel View Post
    Yes they do! When was the last time you were there?
    I work for a small firm that does criminal and other investigations in the U.S. A couple of weeks ago a guy came in and wanted to know why he was denied entry into Santo Domingo. Immigration told him to turn right around and get back on the plane.

    His problem: trafficking conviction. He not only wasted the plane fare but he also had to pay for his rerouted, unexpected flight.

    You have a 50/50 chance of gaining entry. Dominican Immigration officials know if you have had a criminal conviction in the U.S. Your attitude at entry probably makes all the difference.

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  6. #25
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    Big Dan, your guy was black listed. Dom officials only deny entry when they are alerted by TSA or US officials. Your guy had a serious felomy and was traveling to a known drug smuggling destination. I know of people with felony DWI, assault and batteries and mistermeanor drug posession and they have been going to the DR for over 8 years many times a year.

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  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumbo View Post
    Big Dan, your guy was black listed. Dom officials only deny entry when they are alerted by TSA or US officials. Your guy had a serious felomy and was traveling to a known drug smuggling destination. I know of people with felony DWI, assault and batteries and mistermeanor drug posession and they have been going to the DR for over 8 years many times a year.
    I had seen the immigration agents at "El Cibao" Airport checking a thick book with a lot of names in it when they get somebody with a suspicious name. They check their computer and that thick book. I guess they are required to do it by the U.S.A

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ezequiel View Post
    I had seen the immigration agents at "El Cibao" Airport checking a thick book with a lot of names in it when they get somebody with a suspicious name. They check their computer and that thick book. I guess they are required to do it by the U.S.A
    TSA check list. Scanning computers were paid for by TSA. I doubt the DR will ever go socialist like Canada denying entrance for a DWI conviction. There have been times that after a plane leaves a name shows up that is on the no fly list and they give the guy a hard time just because he has the same name as some meathead that sent nasty letters to Bush or Obama.

  10. #28
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    Every country has the right to decide whom they will let in to their country. Some countries take DWI very serious. I have a friend that had a marijuana possession charge when he was 18 in Ontario. He joined the Military and served for 25 years and IN 2005 he and his wife wanted to go to Las Vegas, a place where they spent their honeymoon and had travel to half a dozen times. US Custom at the airport in Vancouver denied him entry based on his marijuana conviction 32 YEARS EARLIER.

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  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob saunders View Post
    Every country has the right to decide whom they will let in to their country. Some countries take DWI very serious. I have a friend that had a marijuana possession charge when he was 18 in Ontario. He joined the Military and served for 25 years and IN 2005 he and his wife wanted to go to Las Vegas, a place where they spent their honeymoon and had travel to half a dozen times. US Custom at the airport in Vancouver denied him entry based on his marijuana conviction 32 YEARS EARLIER.
    What surprises me more is the fact that he served in the Army with a drug record. I know some people that have not been accepted in the Canadian army only for admitting that they have tried marijuana (no charge, no conviction) when they were 15, 16 years old.

  13. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by La Mariposa View Post
    What surprises me more is the fact that he served in the Army with a drug record. I know some people that have not been accepted in the Canadian army only for admitting that they have tried marijuana (no charge, no conviction) when they were 15, 16 years old.
    There are probably more reasons that the ones given on why they were not admited. I told the recruiters back in 1978 that I had tried pot - as did many of my friends.

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