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Thread: Dominican Foods

  1. #311
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    Good to know, thanks. I think, however, I'll be hard pressed to find guava here in the redneck riviera .

  2. #312
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    few days ago i saw that jobo trees are full of fruits so today i am attempting to make jam out of it. so far so good. i don't think i ever saw anyone picking the fruits, does not seem to be very popular.

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  3. #313
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    Quote Originally Posted by dv8 View Post
    few days ago i saw that jobo trees are full of fruits so today i am attempting to make jam out of it. so far so good. i don't think i ever saw anyone picking the fruits, does not seem to be very popular.
    what on earth is a jobo?

  4. #314
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    Quote Originally Posted by the gorgon View Post
    what on earth is a jobo?
    Spondias mombin has several common names. Throughout the Spanish-speaking Caribbean and in Costa Rica and Mexico it is called jobo (derived from the Carib language). In El Salvador, it is called Jocote de Corona. Among the English-speaking Caribbean islands it is known as yellow mombin or hog plum, while in Jamaica it is called Spanish plum, gully plum or coolie plum. In Surinam the fruit is called Mope. In Brazil, the fruit is known by several different names, such as cajá, taperebá and ambaló. In Peru, it is known as uvos or mango ciruelo.

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  5. #315
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    so i made jobo jam and it's quite tasty. i also prepared a more indulgent version, choco-jobo (a jam with addition of cocoa).
    i also made some lime marmalade, which was quite fun. and banana jam, also pretty good.

    my latest discovery is tamarillo. since it kinda tastes like tomato (and is even called tomate de arbol) i used it today to make a sauce for pasta, delicious. i am going to stock on in next time i'm in la sirena.

    and i spent entire week making armenian layer cake.

    is it dominican food if i cook it in DR?

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  6. #316
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    Quote Originally Posted by dv8 View Post
    so i made jobo jam and it's quite tasty. i also prepared a more indulgent version, choco-jobo (a jam with addition of cocoa).
    i also made some lime marmalade, which was quite fun. and banana jam, also pretty good.

    my latest discovery is tamarillo. since it kinda tastes like tomato (and is even called tomate de arbol) i used it today to make a sauce for pasta, delicious. i am going to stock on in next time i'm in la sirena.

    and i spent entire week making armenian layer cake.

    is it dominican food if i cook it in DR?
    i see where you made a marmalade. do yourself a favor. next time tangerines are in season, make yourself some tangering marmalade. there is nothing like it..

  7. #317
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    Quote Originally Posted by dv8 View Post
    Spondias mombin has several common names. Throughout the Spanish-speaking Caribbean and in Costa Rica and Mexico it is called jobo (derived from the Carib language). In El Salvador, it is called Jocote de Corona. Among the English-speaking Caribbean islands it is known as yellow mombin or hog plum, while in Jamaica it is called Spanish plum, gully plum or coolie plum. In Surinam the fruit is called Mope. In Brazil, the fruit is known by several different names, such as cajá, taperebá and ambaló. In Peru, it is known as uvos or mango ciruelo.
    coolie plum? i have never seen them in this country...this is new to me..

  8. #318
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    so you know the fruit? there are several trees in costambar. pain in the rectum to process the fruits because they do not come off the stone like european plums do. you either have to cook them whole, sieve and then cook again or spend an hour shaving the flesh off the stone (and that would only yield one jar of jam so i do't recommend it).

    i caught preserve bug so likely will continue with jams and marmalade for some time. tangerine marmalade sounds good. i will try that.

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  9. #319
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    Quote Originally Posted by dv8 View Post
    so you know the fruit? there are several trees in costambar. pain in the rectum to process the fruits because they do not come off the stone like european plums do. you either have to cook them whole, sieve and then cook again or spend an hour shaving the flesh off the stone (and that would only yield one jar of jam so i do't recommend it).

    i caught preserve bug so likely will continue with jams and marmalade for some time. tangerine marmalade sounds good. i will try that.
    oh, yes, i know it. ate a few truckloads of the in my youth. i can see where they would be a bear to work with.

    tangerine marmalade, made from the outer skin, is beyond awesome. squeeze out all the juice and use it in making the product. beyond good.

  10. #320
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    I always get a kick out of some foreigners' insistence with regard to Dominican empanadas being fried vs baked. Why should we change them? Is is this also asked of PR and Cuban establishments who also fry theirs? Americans have some of the unhealthiest items as staples of American food (i.e. burger and french fries) and one of the highest, if not the highest, obesity rates in the world, so this so-called touchiness regarding our empanadas being fried is a bit ridiculous and I don't believe it to be true. Dominican-style fried empanadas are very popular in the tri-state area, and no, not just with Latinos, you see many 'gringos' that live uptown eating them and when I've brought empanadas for company parties at my corporate jobs with mostly non-hispanic whites here in NY and NJand not a single one is left every time and I bring them from a local Dominican restaurant by my house.

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