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Thread: El Subjuntivo (the Subjunctive)

  1. #1
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    Default El Subjuntivo (the Subjunctive)

    I just found this gem on the subjunctive. These are some pages from a text book but the link is handy and just what is needed as a quick reference especially for those who already have a good understanding of this aspect of grammar.

    Questions always arise about a construction or usage and it is always recommended to consult a proper reference in order to understand why the subjunctive may be used in a particular phrase.


    http://uni.canuelo.net/wp-content/up...y_usos_nvo.pdf


    Regards,

    -MP.

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  3. #2
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    Here is a chapter of a textbook that seems to be a very good resource not only for the subjunctive but for grammar in general.

    I am very familiar with textbooks published by ELE/ SGEL and in my opinion they are one of the best from Spain.

    Grammar is important if you want to speak any language well. As mentioned in many posts, the subjunctive in Spanish is not going away anytime soon. If you can master it then you would be on the road to a having a good command in Spanish and if you already have a good command review from time to time keeps you sharp.

    I really like this link.

    Enjoy and if you have any questions about the exercises just ask.


    http://ele.sgel.es/ficheros/producto...vo_web_263.pdf


    -MP.

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  4. #3
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    Default Subjunctive presentations...

    Here are two short PPTs on the subjunctive with explanations on the site about the grammar points covered. Its not an exhaustive resource but its good as a quick refresher (especially if you are already familiar with the subjunctive in Spanish)

    http://slideplayer.es/slide/9296427/

    http://slideplayer.com/slide/8683684/





    -MP.

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  6. #4
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    I've given up. I will never master it.

    I have mastered the subjunctive in French.

    That's enough for a lifetime. Yes?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    Here are two short PPTs on the subjunctive with explanations on the site about the grammar points covered. Its not an exhaustive resource but its good as a quick refresher (especially if you are already familiar with the subjunctive in Spanish)

    http://slideplayer.es/slide/9296427/

    http://slideplayer.com/slide/8683684/





    -MP.
    Mastering subjunctive is like mastering hurdles. I'm still knocking the hurdles off but I'll get there.

    Tourist: "How do you get to Carnegie Hall?"

    Busker: "Practice, man, practice."



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    Thank you ! Poco a poco, it is starting to come naturally and make sense.

    @ Meemselle: I found Spanish grammar book/explanations in French and it confuses me a LOT less (especially for pretrito de subjuntivo).
    Last edited by Africaida; 12-07-2016 at 05:22 PM.

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  10. #7
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    @ Meemselle- You give up? Why? If you mastered it in French you have a chance to at least grasp it in Spanish. The concept is the same. Where the difference lies in my opinion is how vital it is as a part of grammar in Spanish. Whereas in French you hear some non usage by speakers which is accepted (as far as I know) and in English it’s almost obsolete to the point where in some grammar texts it is described as formal English which I find bizarre. I always heard it in English in my youth but of course I never focused on it until grammar studies came into the mix.

    @Celt202- At least you know what the grammar concept is and that it exists. That is a huge step right there. Keep at it. It makes sense and remember the subjunctive is a mood not a tense.

    @Africaida- Cul es el ttulo del libro que compraste?

    So the past forms of the subjunctive are what you are referring to?
    For example= haya hablado, hablaras and hubieras hablado- you are having difficulty with those forms?

    -MP.

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  12. #8
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    Default Interesting link...

    This link just came up when looking up the past tense of the subjunctive (just to make sure we are on the same page).


    It's quite good not only for the subjunctive but look at the other grammar concepts too and languages- English, French and Spanish.

    https://espanol.lingolia.com/es/gram...ntivo/presente

    -MP.

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  13. #9
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    Default Use your resources- Newspapers

    Learning comes from all resources. The newspaper is a great resource for language learning and exposure to the language because it has a little bit of everything. As we know, there are different levels of journalism but this does not mean we will not see errors or questionable phrases from a grammatical perspective. However, I consider newspaper articles as a learning opportunity whether the grammar is correct or incorrect. It is just a reminder that certain aspects of language are regional and what is common in one area of the Spanish-speaking world maybe unheard of in another region or country.

    I read this article because it caught my attention. It is an article about soccer (fútbol) and the upcoming World Cup in 2018 has a few teams that are first time qualifiers or has countries that have not participated in the World Cup for a number of years. Peru is one of them. The national team will participate for the first time in decades and their star player, Paolo Guerrero is the talk of the town but for all the wrong reasons. He was recently suspended for using a banned substance which would mean no World Cup. However, he has managed to have the sanction reduced to six months which will allow him to play.

    The author of this article is clearly not in favour of this athlete because ‘es un dopado’, ‘un tramposo’ as the journalist states.

    For those trying to learn and master the subjunctive, in addition to text book study, I recommend reading newspaper articles and every time you see the subjunctive used ask yourself if you understand the reason why from a grammatical perspective. If you are unclear, look up the grammar point in a text book or online. In this article, I came across a form that I never seen used before. Clearly the subjunctive is required but the form made me stop and come back several times.


    I looked it up and right on. The form used is regional but considered incorrect in most countries in the Spanish-speaking world according to some dialogues and links in a word reference thread.

    From the article:

    ¡Y lo peor es que puede ganar! Ojalá y lo haga: será la mejor manera de acabar con un premio que hace rato no tiene sentido. Los mejores de América no están en América. Aquí están los NO mejores de América. Evidente.
    The phrase that caught my attention is:

    Ojalá y lo haga….
    I have never heard that or seen that written until now. Ojalá requires the subjunctive but in standard Spanish one would say Ojalá lo haga or Ojalá que lo haga BUT no y in the middle. Apparently, this usage is common in Spain, Mexico and in some parts of South America and obviously used by this journalist. The usage is colloquial according to the comments.

    Ojalá + subjunctive or Ojalá que + subjunctive is standard and correct.

    The article has quite a few examples of subjunctive that one can analyze but this one caught my attention because the form is non-standard. However, I learned a colloquial form of the expression. Next time I see it I will not be surprised.

    http://www.eltiempo.com/deportes/fut...166356 Article

    https://forum.wordreference.com/thre...á-que.444981/




    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 12-30-2017 at 05:20 PM.

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  14. #10
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    Here is an introductory video on the present subjunctive. It's in Spanish but the instructor speaks slowly. He addresses some key points about basic usage.







    -MP.

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