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Thread: Packing Bananas For Export

  1. #1
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    Default Packing Bananas For Export



    This is a "generic" video. The packing plant was in Costa Rica, but it could have just as well been in the Dominican Republic or any other country that exports bananas. The same procedures are used in all.

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    I don't give a hoot about bananas, but Ken, we haven't heard from you in awhile.....at least I haven't noticed you posting. Was just getting worried...... Glad to see you here on dr1.

    Lindsey

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    Did the United Fruit Company not export bananas back in past Sosua?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ramesses View Post
    Did the United Fruit Company not export bananas back in past Sosua?
    Right from La Roca.


    Sosúa before 1939 | Sosúa Virtual Museum

    At the beginning of the 20th Century, the United Fruit Company established a banana plantation in the sparsely populated land surrounding Sosúa. Bananas were a highly prized commodity in the United States, and so big plantations cropped up in several tropical countries. The United Fruit Company plantation had over 1.5 million banana trees, and in the year 1900 they exported 230,000 bunches to the United States alone. A private rail system to transport bananas from the plantations to Sosúa beach contributed to the development of the banana industry and to the colonization of the region. Many people moved to this region to work on the banana plantations and the region flourished. As many as 20 houses, several larger buildings, electricity and running water was available. The banana export initially grew, reaching 640,000 bunches in 1907. As many as 17 vessels per year came to Sosúa Bay to load bananas that arrived in Sosúa. These were then loaded onto barges at the port that transported the bananas to the carrier vessels. Remains of the port are still seen at the east side of Sosúa beach, named by the settlers’ children Los Pilotillos.
 However, several years of bad weather and inappropriate soil and water conditions caused exports to decline to 400,000 bunches in 1911. United Fruit later closed the Sosúa banana operations in 1916.

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    Interesting that it did not show the shipping containers charged with nitrogen to prevent premature ripening.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LindseyKaufman View Post
    I don't give a hoot about bananas, but Ken, we haven't heard from you in awhile.....at least I haven't noticed you posting. Was just getting worried...... Glad to see you here on dr1.

    Lindsey
    Hi Lindsey, no need to worry. Just a short leave of absence.

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  9. #7
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    Glad to see you again Ken

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