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Thread: planning a trip to Cap Haitien

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinyasa View Post
    thanks S, thats a pretty comprehensive answer.

    I assume i can reserve from any CT office? i.e. the one here in Sosua?

    One more question....i assume they will hit me up for my overstay fee when i leave. Do i then get another one month tourist card on reentry? I assume and hope so as i will then be leaving the DR a couple of weeks later and don't want to get hit again for overstay
    Hmm, maybe reserve. But why reserve if space if always available? You can ask this question in advance. The CT website, you can google it, is excellent and contains much detailed information, easy to navigate, etc. In the past 8 years I have crossed into Haiti and returned to the D.R. 25+ times. Unfortunately, I have never found all the details of documentation to be the same at every crossing point in spite of my belief that these must be national immigration polices. For example, I have never paid $10.00 and bought the "tourist card" upon my return to R.D. That's a good thing, I guess. The 30 days begins anew with your passport stamp upon return . . . My latest experience to Haiti: 1. Dominicans need a visa (new); U.S. citizens do not; U.S. citizens and Dominicans alike must pay a $20.00 fee, cash, in U.S. dollars as well as HTG 200.

    As a rule, my experience only, I have never experienced hustling at the Haitian immigration sites, but I have experienced an extortion attempt on the Dominican side in Elias Pina--attempt failed. The Haitian officials have been very professional and efficient, if terse. Your mileage may vary . . .

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by drstock View Post
    Does this apply to non-Dominicans? Thanks.
    The new visa requirements for Dominicans are fairly new and likely a result of the political skirmishing. U.S. citizens do not need a visa. But both Dominicans and Americans must pay a $20.00 fee, cash, U.S., dollars. Regretfully, I don't remember the name of this document but you will receive a signed and dated copy in French, the language of commerce and government. Youmust also pay HTG 200. I can't speak for other nationalities.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by windeguy View Post
    Sounds like I will never visit Haiti. Been in the DR for 13 years and never once considered going. What I read above does not sound enticing in the least.
    The lack of infrastructure is certainly an issue; particularly the lack of electricity and running water; same issues as in the D.R.but to a greater degree. Personally, I go for people, not things. I admire the resiliency and self-possession of the people. I always return a little dirtier and hungrier but, also, a happier person. My preference would be to live both in Haiti and the D.R. but I cannot afford Haiti for the long-term--three to four times more expensive for accommodations; and the lack of electricity, for me, is a deal-breaker for a long-term stay as I'm on my computer five hours per day.

  4. #14
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    I've visited Cap Haitien and Jacmel in the last two years. Yes, one has to get used to low level of street lighting. But I didn't feel insecure even alone. Also the nightlife is very low level, at least in these cities, except the Carnaval in Jacmel, which can keep pace with any Carnival in the DR.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucas61 View Post
    Hmm, maybe reserve. But why reserve if space if always available? You can ask this question in advance. The CT website, you can google it, is excellent and contains much detailed information, easy to navigate, etc. In the past 8 years I have crossed into Haiti and returned to the D.R. 25+ times. Unfortunately, I have never found all the details of documentation to be the same at every crossing point in spite of my belief that these must be national immigration polices. For example, I have never paid $10.00 and bought the "tourist card" upon my return to R.D. That's a good thing, I guess. The 30 days begins anew with your passport stamp upon return . . . My latest experience to Haiti: 1. Dominicans need a visa (new); U.S. citizens do not; U.S. citizens and Dominicans alike must pay a $20.00 fee, cash, in U.S. dollars as well as HTG 200.

    As a rule, my experience only, I have never experienced hustling at the Haitian immigration sites, but I have experienced an extortion attempt on the Dominican side in Elias Pina--attempt failed. The Haitian officials have been very professional and efficient, if terse. Your mileage may vary . . .
    Someone told me there is a fee of Sixty USD for Americans returning into the DR from Haiti. That is the reason I cancelled a trip I had planned.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derfish View Post
    Someone told me there is a fee of Sixty USD for Americans returning into the DR from Haiti. That is the reason I cancelled a trip I had planned.
    We went with a group and crossed the border at Dajabon during market day. What an experience that was! Hundreds of people coming at us with whole beds and boxes three times larger than them on their heads. It was ordered mayhem. Country actually looks allot like the DR with same flora and fauna. Did not see mas deforestation as you see in the southern region around Puerto Principe. Cap Haitain is very interesting town with its colonial buildings painted a in bright primal colors. The river was a bit shocking as it looked like a giant sewer with people almost living in it. But in the actual town You can just imagine pirates and bucaneers walking down the streets. We stayed in the Cornier Plage hotel which is about 10 km past the town. It has a lovely private beach and was owned by Jaques Cousteau once. Food was great. We visited the Citadel and took the hike up the mountain on horse back. Amazing place built by hand. Probably one of the most spectacular buildings in the whole caribbean and well worth the visit.
    My visit to that area greatly improved my impression of Haiti. The people were very friendly and that part of the world is not much different to the DR campo.

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  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucas61 View Post
    The lack of infrastructure is certainly an issue; particularly the lack of electricity and running water; same issues as in the D.R.but to a greater degree. Personally, I go for people, not things. I admire the resiliency and self-possession of the people. I always return a little dirtier and hungrier but, also, a happier person. My preference would be to live both in Haiti and the D.R. but I cannot afford Haiti for the long-term--three to four times more expensive for accommodations; and the lack of electricity, for me, is a deal-breaker for a long-term stay as I'm on my computer five hours per day.
    I think the present of the UN in Haiti ups the price on the nicer hotels... stayed at vista lodge outside of airport in port au prince twenty yrs. ago at $80 per night.... who knows the price today. If you live middle class it will cost up.


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