View Poll Results: What do you call orange when speaking Spanish?

Voters
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  • Exclusively naranja/anaranjado

    23 62.16%
  • Exclusively mamey

    1 2.70%
  • More often naranja/anaranjado

    6 16.22%
  • More often mamey

    5 13.51%
  • Both interchangeably

    2 5.41%
  • I don't or hardly speak Spanish.

    0 0%
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Thread: Unique Dominican Names for Certain Colors

  1. #11
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    i use naranja. i learnt the word mamey maybe last week, it was in an article in a newspaper and i had to ask what it meant. on a similar note, we have white and ginger cat and our maid refers to it as gata amarilla. hmmm...

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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo View Post
    Mr AE, born and bred in DR has never heard a Dominican say mamey for orange. When I asked him how he says orange he said anaranjado, and looked at me like I was nuts when I asked if he ever says mamey. He's wondering if it's a generational thing? Something new in the last 40 years?
    Which prompts this question: Do some Dominicans married to foreigners pretend... to never have heard certain terms so as to appear cultured and/or educated and, thus, receive seal of approval from their foreign spouses? Sorta like saying, "My spouse is not the typical Dumbminican."

    First, he never heard 'sioretó' for short-stop, and now says he never heard 'mamey' in place of anaranjado.

    You could tell him que eso no se lo cree ni él mismo.

  3. #13
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    What is the difference between a China and a Naranja? I was in Supermercado Nacional last weekend, I was asking if they had any chinas (feeling clever and using the local word) and they went hunting. After 5 mins they came back and said no, they only had some naranjas. Which looked like oranges to me. I didn't want to admit that I didn't know the difference, so I said "oh I guess they will have to do then". But what is the difference?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TropicalPaul View Post
    What is the difference between a China and a Naranja? I was in Supermercado Nacional last weekend, I was asking if they had any chinas (feeling clever and using the local word) and they went hunting. After 5 mins they came back and said no, they only had some naranjas. Which looked like oranges to me. I didn't want to admit that I didn't know the difference, so I said "oh I guess they will have to do then". But what is the difference?
    A China is a mandarin orange.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob saunders View Post
    A China is a mandarin orange.
    a mandarin orange (i.g. tangerine) is: madarina




  6. #16
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    In Miami, a china is a juice orange, usually yellowish-orange with unsightly blotches and lots of juice.
    The words china and naranja seem to be used synonymously in Miami, where Cuban usage predominates.
    china is short for naranja china, Chinese orange, a type of orange.

    Tangerines and not chinas, they are mandarinas, at least to the people I know.

  7. #17
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    People in Santo Domingo refer to oranges as "chinas", but in El Cibao region it's just a naranja. I think there's a an old thread about it!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucifer View Post
    Which prompts this question: Do some Dominicans married to foreigners pretend... to never have heard certain terms so as to appear cultured and/or educated and, thus, receive seal of approval from their foreign spouses? Sorta like saying, "My spouse is not the typical Dumbminican."

    First, he never heard 'sioretó' for short-stop, and now says he never heard 'mamey' in place of anaranjado.

    You could tell him que eso no se lo cree ni él mismo.
    I don't know! I´m Dominican and I had no clue what "sirotetó" was. Yeah, mamey is common, but not the other one.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucifer View Post
    Which prompts this question: Do some Dominicans married to foreigners pretend... to never have heard certain terms so as to appear cultured and/or educated and, thus, receive seal of approval from their foreign spouses? Sorta like saying, "My spouse is not the typical Dumbminican."

    First, he never heard 'sioretó' for short-stop, and now says he never heard 'mamey' in place of anaranjado.

    You could tell him que eso no se lo cree ni él mismo.
    Haha, I'm not going to say it's impossible but Mr AE is the least pretentious person I know. He doesn't give a whoot about what anyone thinks of him, sometime to my chagrin




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  10. Likes Aguaita29, Africaida liked this post
  11. #20
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    There is some confusion about the names of several fruits and plants.
    There are at least three herbs that are understood to be cilantro (coriander): what everyone else calls cilantro, a long skinny leafed plant also called culantro, and a type of parsley (perejil).

    A common citrus fruit used as a marinade is the naranja agria (bitter orange). It is rather like what is called an ugli fruit, but not so ugly.
    Most tasteless meat and fish can be improved by marinating it in naranja agria and other spices (pepper, garlic & onion powder, cumin, annato, etc) in the fridge overnight.

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