View Poll Results: What do you call orange when speaking Spanish?

Voters
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  • Exclusively naranja/anaranjado

    23 62.16%
  • Exclusively mamey

    1 2.70%
  • More often naranja/anaranjado

    6 16.22%
  • More often mamey

    5 13.51%
  • Both interchangeably

    2 5.41%
  • I don't or hardly speak Spanish.

    0 0%
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Thread: Unique Dominican Names for Certain Colors

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aguaita29 View Post
    I don't know! I´m Dominican and I had no clue what "sirotetó" was. Yeah, mamey is common, but not the other one.
    miesposo also does not know sioretó. in his defense he knows nothing about sport (i remember it to be a term related to boring ass baseball, right?). mamey he knows and uses.

    few weeks ago i had to do translation work and when the conversation moved to sport i said that i was done because i don't know sport terms in any of the languages i use, not even in polish.

    North Coast Moderator

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  3. #22
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    I always correct my children when they say mamey.

  4. #23
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    In Castilian Spanish it's naranja

    If I'm not mistaken in Puerto Rico a "mamey" stands for something that's very easy

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bárbaro View Post
    In Castilian Spanish it's naranja

    If I'm not mistaken in Puerto Rico a "mamey" stands for something that's very easy
    ============================
    la naranja is the fruit. The word comes from Arabic, probably from Persian
    el naranjo is the orange tree.
    el naranjal is an orange grove
    anaranjado, anaranjada, anaranjados, anaranjadas are the four forms of the adjective that refers to the color.

    people also say "de color naranja."

    El mamey is a different tropical fruit, also called sapote colorado.
    It is orange inside and tan outside.

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  7. #25
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    Default Coman mamey

    Coman mamey!


  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xavier_Onassis View Post
    ============================
    la naranja is the fruit. The word comes from Arabic, probably from Persian
    el naranjo is the orange tree.
    el naranjal is an orange grove
    anaranjado, anaranjada, anaranjados, anaranjadas are the four forms of the adjective that refers to the color.

    people also say "de color naranja."

    El mamey is a different tropical fruit, also called sapote colorado.
    It is orange inside and tan outside.
    Yes to all of that, but speaking of the colour, people in Spain GENERALLY say "naranja" just as they say "blanco/amarillo/verde" etc instead of saying: "de color naranja/verde/rojo..."

    Of course you have "anaranjado", just as you have "verdoso" or "amarillento"

    As you pointed out, probably the fact dominicans call the colour "mamey" is due to the colour of the fruit (Zapote), just like "rojo cereza" and others.

    Yeah, the word entered Spanish via Arabic "nāranǧ" form persian "nārang", from sanskrit "nāraṅga"

    I'm confirming in Puerto Rico "mamey" is also used as a synonym of "easy", as in the song of Calle 13: "esto es fácil, esto es un mamey, qué importa si te gusta Green Day..."

  9. #27
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    verdoso means "greenish", amarillento translates as "yellowish"

    anaranjado is five syllables and therefore it saves time to say naranja.

    Many naranjas are orange, but some are more yellowish outside than orange. Inside, blood oranges are red.

    The color of the inside of a mamey varies less, but they are not common in Spain, and less so in the South American cone area.
    I did not see any in Uruguay, Paraguay or Misiones in Argentina, but perhaps they were out of season.

    Mbaracuyá (parcha/ passionfruit) and guavas/ guayabas were all over the place.

    As for the slang use of mamey, I am not familiar with that, but I will take your word for it.

  10. #28
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    The "long skinny leafed plant also called culantro" I always heard called "cilantro ancho".

  11. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by JDJones View Post
    OK... so what's a "china-mandarina"?


    I've always been told that's a tangerine.

    So now,, What's a "Tangelo"?
    Tangerine and pommelo cross?

  12. #30
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    So far as I know, a tangelo is a tangelo in Spanish. It is essentially a hybrid cross between a tangerine and a grapefruit.

    mandarinas are the usual name I have heard for tangerines.

    I have never run across pomelos (like grapefruits with a very thick layer of white pulp between the peel and the edible part, or kumquats, which are a tiny citrus.
    Limoncillos (kanepas, kanips) are not a citrus, neither are loquats, which are called nísperos in the DR.

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