View Poll Results: What do you call orange when speaking Spanish?

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  • Exclusively naranja/anaranjado

    23 62.16%
  • Exclusively mamey

    1 2.70%
  • More often naranja/anaranjado

    6 16.22%
  • More often mamey

    5 13.51%
  • Both interchangeably

    2 5.41%
  • I don't or hardly speak Spanish.

    0 0%
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Thread: Unique Dominican Names for Certain Colors

  1. #31
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    Most dictionaries define lemons as limones, and limes as limas, but to most Americans, lemons are yellow and limes are green,
    In every Spanish speaking country I have visited, including the DR, limones are green, and yellow ones are not to be found. I am not entirely sure of the usage in Spain.
    I know that I bought something labeled "zumo de laranja" that was simply orange juice.

    Here in Florida, I have seen yellow lemons the size of grapefruits.Ideal for lemonade.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xavier_Onassis View Post
    So far as I know, a tangelo is a tangelo in Spanish. It is essentially a hybrid cross between a tangerine and a grapefruit.

    mandarinas are the usual name I have heard for tangerines.

    I have never run across pomelos (like grapefruits with a very thick layer of white pulp between the peel and the edible part, or kumquats, which are a tiny citrus.
    Limoncillos (kanepas, kanips) are not a citrus, neither are loquats, which are called nísperos in the DR.
    You can get Pomelos in Playero Supermercado, at least in Sosua...

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xavier_Onassis View Post
    So far as I know, a tangelo is a tangelo in Spanish. It is essentially a hybrid cross between a tangerine and a grapefruit.

    mandarinas are the usual name I have heard for tangerines.

    I have never run across pomelos (like grapefruits with a very thick layer of white pulp between the peel and the edible part, or kumquats, which are a tiny citrus.
    Limoncillos (kanepas, kanips) are not a citrus, neither are loquats, which are called nísperos in the DR.
    You can get Pomelos in Playero Supermercado, at least in Sosua...

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xavier_Onassis View Post
    In every Spanish speaking country I have visited, including the DR, limones are green, and yellow ones are not to be found. I am not entirely sure of the usage in Spain.
    In Spain lemons are yellow. I believe dominicans call those yellow lemons "limón persa"

    Don't know what a "tangelo" is

  5. #35
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    The term "Persian lime" refers to a green hybrid lime in the US.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persian_lime

    I have heard the term Limón persa and limón pérsica on occasion, but I do not recall the place or the context. I do not dispute you on this.
    I have never seen a tangelo in the DR, but I have never looked for one. I have never been in one of those huge, have everything fruit markets in the DR.
    I have heard there are some really large markets in SD, and someday I will check one out.
    I know from my reading that limón is a fruit that is expected to be yellow in Spain.
    I recall seeing yellow lemons in the Mercado de la Lagunilla in Mexico City once.
    A friend once defined "comida" in Mexico as anything you can squirt jugo de limón on and eat.
    In Mexico limonada is always made with green limones.

  6. Likes bárbaro liked this post
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