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Thread: DNA: Genographic Sets Sail to the Dominican Republic

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by CristoRey View Post
    Indeed, one need wonder as my DNA could have easily been (accidently) taken while
    collecting saliva samples from the local women of Sosua
    i laughed at this way more than i should have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CristoRey View Post
    I wonder what all of those friendly white folks in Gurabo think of this
    It just confirms what we've always known, the rest of the country is way darker/more African than us :P. Kidding aside, I love these sorts of test. I hope they can also release the haplogroups.

    P.S If Gurabo had been picked for saliva samples, the results may have looked a bit different, but that would have not been objective. I know of quite a few Guraberos (me included) who have taken the 23andme test and on average for Guraberos the results are 80-90% European with the rest being a split between Taino and African.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    Another thing that is simply crazy is how can it be possible for the 'average people of' Bani to be on average more than half afro while Azua is about a quarter afro? Azua isn't quite known for being considerably light skin, while Bani is probably the whitest town of any significant size in the entire southern region.

    How is that possible? Just how?

    Did they actually went to Bani and Azua? Really?
    bani used to be the whitest, not anymore

    more roads now endays and dominicans from other parts are there too especially from san cristobal and santo domingo of the lower class spector, this part i can understand do for that reason

    but yes ur right, however it was back in the day , i went to bani recently and i saw more blacks and dark skinned ppl vastly out number whites, but my grandmother who is from bani told me it was the opposite

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    I bring this map from another forum.

    Each black dot represent the 25 places where the National Geographic team collected 1,000 DNA samples (40 per place of people that claimed to be Dominican of two Dominican parents and four Dominican grandparents, and that had been living in the place for at least 10 years).



    Larger size: https://s25.postimg.org/xm7ctathb/Mapa_RD.jpg

    For the sake of making sense of it all, lets assume that the Vega Real of the Cibao Valley (the second most densely populated part of the country) was facing some disease epidemic when they were collecting their samples, because otherwise it makes no sense!

    They did it right in the southern parts of the country. I wonder what happened when it was time to get a representative sample of the northern population.

    In the article they also claim that this is the largest DNA test ever done in the DR, when in reality the largest was done by Dr �lvarez Perell� in the 1950's. He had over 9,000 blood samples, not the 500-something they claim in the Diario Libre article. He says it in the article he published roughly half a century ago:



    Larger size: https://s32.postimg.org/7ms163tx1/Perello.jpg
    whoa 9,000 "el diablo" crazy too cause it was back in the 50s when technology is scarce but it was taken by a Dominican who knew his spots

    however i will add to the fact that why is DR always the main concentration point when it comes to DNA studies and or racial demographics? Why in every single forum including youtube we as dominicans and others have to debate this issue. Reason for my question is that im a well traveled man and i can tell you for a fact, lets take a look at cuba where the population distribution is varies a lot by region much more than the DR. The east is much blacker than the west (obviously) but they do not talk about the heavy concentration of haitian, jamaican, and bahamian descendants in cuba which contributes god knows how much of their black population. Also take note that cubans are not really cubans until only a few generations in their majority, because many cubans have very recent ancestry from spain and the canary islands, i can also talk and debate/argue about the Puerto Rican population in how more than half of their blacks are Dominicans or Dominican descendants and another quater being of Haitian and Virgin Islander descent. PR's white population though much more mixed than cuba's white population is also pretty recent from the canarians who came in the late 1800s that DR's lacks which we can all say that the white pop in the cibao valley is pretty ancient and colonial but not pure anymore.

    All of the lesser antilles black pop are not purely or limited to their own islands niether prior to leaving Africa, all of those islands have recent black migrants from each other and mixed very well. Same with venezuela. panama, colombia, all of central america. So DR is not really anything special as a matter of fact the DR's black pop is just as pure as the white pop, they came directly from Africa via curacao, brazil, and or cape verda during the colonial era, not including the very tiny minority of cocolos which everyone knows by now that many left for PR, nearby islands, or back to their hometowns inclduing the mixed Afro-Dominican ones so. As one guy said, the first places to be discovered or established will always remain the purest. after the haitian revolution, the haitians were kicked out and including the dominicans who were with the haitians in 1844 whcih is why so many haitians have dominican or spanish surnames and we have non from them so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo View Post
    Genographic Sets Sail to the Dominican Republic

    �The Dominican Republic has it all.� That phrase is not just the slogan that tourists see when visiting the beautiful Caribbean nation, but it is also what a team of geneticists and anthropologists are hoping to show as they embark on a one-of-a-kind study across the eastern half of the island of Hispa�ola.

    Drs. Theodore Schurr and Miguel Vilar, two Genographic Project scientists, recently visited the Caribbean country to help launch an ambitious project that intends to map the diversity and ancestry of the people of the Dominican Republic, and by doing so better understand the history of the region. The project is being led a team of Dominican researchers and is part of a collaboration between La Universidad Iberoamericana (UNIBE) and La Academia Dominicana de la Historia, both in Santo Domingo, and the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

    Over the course of the next several months, researchers and students from UNIBE will visit most provinces in the country and meet with people from at least 25 different communities. They hope to enroll some 1000 individuals and analyze the DNA samples and demographic histories collected from them.

    �Visiting the remote communities really shows us the great diversity of our country, the culture, the idiosyncrasies of the inhabitants of the various provinces, and the richness of what we are,� explains Dr. Robert Paulino, lead researcher and UNIBE professor. �We are the instruments of mother Africa, the nobility of the indigenous Taino, and the European adventurer. That mixture is what makes us Dominicans.� Once completed, this project will be one of the most comprehensive studies conducted in a single country during the Genographic Project�s 10-year history.

    With keen interest in Caribbean history, in 2014 Vilar and Schurr published an article on the genetic diversity of Puerto Rico explaining how the DNAs of modern Puerto Ricans show patterns of both historic and prehistoric (pre-colonial) importance. And just last month the two scientists teamed up with Dr. Jada Benn-Torres of Notre Dame University and indigenous leaders from the islands of St. Vincent and Trinidad on a new publication that shows how the genetic patterns in those Lesser Antillean communities inform us about early Caribbean migrations, as well as colonial practices and hardships of the last five-hundred years.

    �We�re really trying to connect the dots and understand the migration, the flow of people in and out of the region,� said Schurr. �Each island seems to have its distinct history.� To learn more about this and other work of the Genographic Project work visit www.genographic.com.

    http://voices.nationalgeographic.com...ican-republic/
    Sounds like a great study to finally get a better picture of the ancestors of the current citizens of the DR. They will be able to see their "roots", whether African, Spanish, Taino or other through the study of DNA. The results should be very interesting and eye opening.

  7. #26
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    I wonder how you find Spanish roots in DNA. Caucasian probably yes, but from one specific country? I might be wrong though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fulano2 View Post
    I wonder how you find Spanish roots in DNA. Caucasian probably yes, but from one specific country? I might be wrong though.


    You're wrong.

    They not only can tell you what country, they often can tell you what region or province.  Ancestry DNA not only gives you your ancient ancestry, it now breaks down where your ancestors lived 300 years ago, and in my case it was almost frighteningly accurate. 




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    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo View Post
    You're wrong.

    They not only can tell you what country, they often can tell you what region or province.  Ancestry DNA not only gives you your ancient ancestry, it now breaks down where your ancestors lived 300 years ago, and in my case it was almost frighteningly accurate. 
    I knew a girl who made a living fluffing auras. She could tell you what color your aura was and what that meant as far as happiness and a lot of other stuff. Makes about as much sense as telling one where their ancestors lived 300 years ago.
    Der Fish

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    Quote Originally Posted by CristoRey View Post
    More people collecting more people�s DNA... Hmmmm
    Could be a conspiracy, like putting floride in our water?

  12. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derfish View Post
    I knew a girl who made a living fluffing auras. She could tell you what color your aura was and what that meant as far as happiness and a lot of other stuff. Makes about as much sense as telling one where their ancestors lived 300 years ago.
    Der Fish


    I happen to know exactly where my ancestors lived 300 years ago, what surprised me was that my saliva told them that, precisely. Now, think about an adoptee who knows nothing about their biological family.........




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