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Thread: A stroll down the malecon in Barahona.

  1. #1
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    Default A stroll down the malecon in Barahona.

    The seaport has changed a lot from last year. Usually there was a ship in the port, but where the ship used to be, it looks as though they have filled it in. There is a large area with piles of stuff. I asked a local guy and he said it was gypsum and salt. It seems strange to have salt or gypsum piled up where it would get rained on.
    When there is no ship in the port, there is an old tugboat they used to park there to add a nautical air.
    The salt is shipped to the US and perhaps Canada to deal with icy roads. It comes from some salt mines near Barahona. There are also some gypsum mines,
    There is an improved fish market down the Malecon from the Sugar mill. The beach has been improved a bit as well, someone seems to be picking up all those damned plastic bottles.

    I was sitting there contemplating the scenery when a skinny old guy in shorts and a tee shirt walked by. He claimed to be a world traveler. He told me he was from a "tiny country surrounded by powerful enemies", and invited me to guess. Of course, I knew he was Israeli, but just to play with him, I said "Georgia".
    Gotta admit that Russia is more powerful than Egypt, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan. He also said he had a US passport, and said that he just arrived in Barahona and didn't want to take a motoconcho. he claimed to be in real estate and to own an apartment building in Santo Domingo. He also said that he bought a house in Cuba for $10,000 and fixed it up and sold it at a profit. Then he said he had a mint condition 1955 Mercury convertible in Havana.
    It was fun listening to him make things up, and I figured that he would stop being amusing if I suggested that his tales were a bit hard to swallow.
    He told me that I should wear shorts, like him. I pointed out that men in Barahona do not wear shorts, because it is a good way to get burned by the muffler on a motoconcho, which I know from experience to be true.
    I suggested a beer, but he wanted to go for a swim, so I let him go on his way.

    Too bad, as I wanted to hear about the castle he flipped in Montenegro. and his stable of vintage Bugattis.

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  3. #2
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    If you get off on the left side of a motoconcho you don't have to worry about getting burned

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xavier_Onassis View Post
    The seaport has changed a lot from last year. Usually there was a ship in the port, but where the ship used to be, it looks as though they have filled it in. There is a large area with piles of stuff. I asked a local guy and he said it was gypsum and salt. It seems strange to have salt or gypsum piled up where it would get rained on.
    When there is no ship in the port, there is an old tugboat they used to park there to add a nautical air.
    The salt is shipped to the US and perhaps Canada to deal with icy roads. It comes from some salt mines near Barahona. There are also some gypsum mines,
    There is an improved fish market down the Malecon from the Sugar mill. The beach has been improved a bit as well, someone seems to be picking up all those damned plastic bottles.

    I was sitting there contemplating the scenery when a skinny old guy in shorts and a tee shirt walked by. He claimed to be a world traveler. He told me he was from a "tiny country surrounded by powerful enemies", and invited me to guess. Of course, I knew he was Israeli, but just to play with him, I said "Georgia".
    Gotta admit that Russia is more powerful than Egypt, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan. He also said he had a US passport, and said that he just arrived in Barahona and didn't want to take a motoconcho. he claimed to be in real estate and to own an apartment building in Santo Domingo. He also said that he bought a house in Cuba for $10,000 and fixed it up and sold it at a profit. Then he said he had a mint condition 1955 Mercury convertible in Havana.
    It was fun listening to him make things up, and I figured that he would stop being amusing if I suggested that his tales were a bit hard to swallow.
    He told me that I should wear shorts, like him. I pointed out that men in Barahona do not wear shorts, because it is a good way to get burned by the muffler on a motoconcho, which I know from experience to be true.
    I suggested a beer, but he wanted to go for a swim, so I let him go on his way.

    Too bad, as I wanted to hear about the castle he flipped in Montenegro. and his stable of vintage Bugattis.
    Great story!

    Frank

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    He also claimed that he made a killing on real estate in Miami Beach. But then he said he no longer liked Miami Beach because it was too expensive. I thought that was funny.

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