Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Barahona Tourism

  1. #1
    On Vacation!
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    3,980
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Barahona Tourism



    Marketing an image is key these days to attracting development money.

    Barahona's Tourist body can do just that.

  2. Likes bachata liked this post
  3. #2
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    30,562
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The single biggest challenge to tourism in the SW is a fact that no one can control: it is extremely hot there, even in winter. Summer months are even more brutal.

    Even the wind is hot and dry.

  4. #3
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    18,434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Good point CB

    I wonder where the Spaniards had their first vineyard?
    My research says the cut-off line (latitudinally) is about north coast level...
    below that is a risk.

    Maybe my comment belongs in the Ocoa bay wine thread

  5. #4
    On Vacation!
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    3,980
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cobraboy View Post
    The single biggest challenge to tourism in the SW is a fact that no one can control: it is extremely hot there, even in winter. Summer months are even more brutal.

    Even the wind is hot and dry.
    If one is marketing to an audience of North American visitors, warmer winter temperatures and less effect from cold fronts reaching the island is probably a bonus.

    The modern more adventurous tourist.....and often those with more money to spend.....wants warm weather, minimal humidity and plenty to do on their short vacation.

    Many of the hotels shown in the video are located in the Baoruco area which does get it's rainfall as the lush green tropical canopy confirms.

    Variation from a flat landscape and a good beach with plenty of eco options will appeal to the target market this area is after. And the development money will, or rather does, like the interest that can be attracted from that lucrative market.

  6. #5
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    30,562
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ju10prd View Post
    If one is marketing to an audience of North American visitors, warmer winter temperatures and less effect from cold fronts reaching the island is probably a bonus.

    The modern more adventurous tourist.....and often those with more money to spend.....wants warm weather, minimal humidity and plenty to do on their short vacation.

    Many of the hotels shown in the video are located in the Baoruco area which does get it's rainfall as the lush green tropical canopy confirms.

    Variation from a flat landscape and a good beach with plenty of eco options will appeal to the target market this area is after. And the development money will, or rather does, like the interest that can be attracted from that lucrative market.
    The market you refer to is tiny. Even eco-tourism is tiny.

    And the SW isn't just a little warmer. It can be brutally HOT. Like an oven. Seriously. There are a few oasis but they are still really hot...they just have some water.

    It's an interesting area no doubt, but after a few days there we're happy to leave for cooler climes.

    Additionally, with the exception of Bahia de Las Aguilas, the beaches are suboptimal for tourism. Mainly rocks.

    People come to the DR looking for a tropical Caribbean fantasy. The SW ain't it.

  7. #6
    Gold
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,898
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The beaches near Barahona are rocky or far too covered with plastic water and refresco bottles, and the sea has pretty strong currents.
    Los Patos and San Rafael have great fresh water pools, which are nice and the drive along the coast is stunning.
    Paraiso is less than Paradise.
    Yes, it is hot. But there is normally a breeze. Las Terrenas has nicer beaches. I cannot comment on Bahia de Aguilas because I have not been there.

  8. #7
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    18,950
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Xavier_Onassis View Post
    The beaches near Barahona are rocky or far too covered with plastic water and refresco bottles, and the sea has pretty strong currents.
    Los Patos and San Rafael have great fresh water pools, which are nice and the drive along the coast is stunning.
    Paraiso is less than Paradise.
    Yes, it is hot. But there is normally a breeze. Las Terrenas has nicer beaches. I cannot comment on Bahia de Aguilas because I have not been there.
    Someone must have seen your post

    Today's paper has an article about a clean up campaign of the Barahona beaches. They've begun with El Quemaito

    http://almomento.net/barahona-inicia...-playas/224310




    Super Moderator
    DR1.com

  9. #8
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    873
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Travelling to Barahona is more expensive than Cancun, Florida or Hawaii. Who in their right mind and with a level of respect for their families well being would choose to swim in garbage surrounded by Haitians?

  10. #9
    Regular
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    453
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rfp View Post
    Travelling to Barahona is more expensive than Cancun, Florida or Hawaii. Who in their right mind and with a level of respect for their families well being would choose to swim in garbage surrounded by Haitians?
    I must not be in my right mind then To have a beautiful beach such as Bahia de las Aguilas to myself, wake up the next morning in Barahona, eat brunch in San Jose de Ochoa with some awesome coffee and then see the mountains of Valle Nueva is my idea of a great vacation. I think when the new highway connecting the country's center to the SW many more will want to experience this type of vacation

  11. Likes AlterEgo, ju10prd liked this post
  12. #10
    Gold
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,898
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Who in their right mind and with a level of respect for their families well being would choose to swim in garbage surrounded by Haitians?

    San Rafael and Los Patos are inexpensive and pleasant places, and free of garbage and trash. Many Haitians have been deported from Barahona, and I never saw any of them at any of the beaches.
    The worst problems are that the beaches are rocky rather than sandy and that the Ocean is rough and has a strong undertow in many places.
    The North Coast is presently more convenient and more alluring than Barahona. This may change in the distant future.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •