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Thread: Passenger Trains in DR?

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by drstock View Post
    Fascinating, all this talk about the hardness of rails.
    Everyone has their area of expertise. I like reading various facts of this type.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by windeguy View Post
    PICHARDO, A hybrid rail system uses engine technology with different ways of generating electricity to turn the wheels. Why does that require special much harder rails any more than a hybrid car requires special tires and roads?

    (I had to chuckle at your mention of a maglev train system needing such hard rail supermetal - Such trains ride above the rails and as such are not in contact with them. I am a bit surprised that the DR does not go directly to maglev trains. Completely different technologies.
    The DR could also be the first to use Elon Musk's new transport scheme. )

    Back to reality. What is the exact name of this new super alloy rail? What is its hardness?

    Hybrid rail system refers to the rail part winds guy... Means rails of dual use, where conditions must met at all times during its service life. Hybrid passenger and heavy cargo rails are not made with the same steel alloys as the ones you posted (good try).

    Like I said, these are relatively less than a decade old in use. They are very expensive due to the alloy tech employed in them.
    Also the top part of the rail is not your average fold.

    The first misconception people have of maglev trains is that they always are floating above the rails, which is only true when the train is put in motion. When the system breaks, it does it by friction. Lots of it.

    Anyhow I hope this ends this side chit chat!
    One Dominican at a time please!


  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by windeguy View Post
    Here is a link to the company that says they have 100% share of the Japanese rail market. The rails they produce are in the 400 Brinnell Hardness range. Hard, but I get the feeling that a torch can cut them.
    They are not from the planet Krypton:

    World's highest-quality rail products

    Reduction in total cost by being the world's hardest, straightest, and longest lived.

    The highest degree of hardness in the world realizes a high degree of economy.

    Our rail products boast the highest degree of hardness in the world, realizing superb life cycle cost.
    Particularly, the "HE rail" has high wear resistance and high resistance to surface damage, making for long life and reduced grinding, which in turn realizes improved economy.



    The highest degree of hardness in the world realizes a high degree of economy.
    We can manufacture very straight rails in 150m lengths.

    Our independently developed universal rolling machine enables us to manufacture straighter rails.
    We can offer rails that have a high degree of straightness, such as rails for high-speed trains.

    We can correct deviations from the horizontal axis and the vertical axis using our own universal rolling machine.

    https://www.nssmc.com/en/product/use/railway/

    Or is the DR rail system using some other rail technology not currently searchable from the Internet?
    Japan's first trials on their maglev bullet train were carried out with imported rails. The said company lacked the patent for the space age alloys at the time. It wasn't until the limited trial was expanded to include the full travel distance on that test line, that the Japanese were able to employ the patents and more importantly, the tooling to produce the alloy as engineered.


    And yes, you can't obtain data on the new alloys on the wiki. This is still technology that's safeguarded and only some instances of the partial semi-finish alloys allowed to some steel industries to be incorporated into their rail making productions.

    It's a military primary use alloy, which has been allowed to limited partners on a case by case situation. If you want maybe find out more, read and research as you did, but on tank tracks. That's where they are used by the USA and fellow few friendlies.

    Just so you know: The first instances of flat panel displays were employed in tanks too...

    Just because you can't wiki them, doesn't meant they aren't there in use today.
    Btw: I myself don't know how this alloy is made or even tooled to rail technology!
    Last edited by PICHARDO; 08-08-2016 at 12:44 AM.
    One Dominican at a time please!


  4. #44
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    Just to save you some wiki:

    The Japanese trials of maglev were carried out using electromagnets, not permanent magnets on the test train.
    Until there's not enough data from real life operations to support otherwise.
    One Dominican at a time please!


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