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Thread: El español dominicano

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    Default El español dominicano

    I found this commentary and blog on Dominican Spanish which I thought was very interesting and worthy of posting. In general, it does not present anything that has not been discussed in the forum over the years about Spanish in the Dominican Republic. However, I found it worthy to read another researched perspective about some of the most commonly discussed topics about features of Spanish spoken in the Dominican Republic.


    http://misterprofesor.blogspot.ca/20...ominicano.html


    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 04-14-2017 at 03:29 PM.

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    Default Article- 'Ello hay mucha’ folma de hablai españor’

    Here is another article that came up in my research published by Diario Libre in 2012. No matter how long ago it is the information is always valuable from a linguistic perspective. Look at the title of the article:

    Ello hay mucha’ folma de hablai españor

    I like this article in particular as it points out features of Dominican Spanish today that are archaisms that have not phased out of the Dominican vernacular. Language changes over time and all languages experience an evolution. There are many examples of this just by reading a novel that was written decades or even centuries ago. The language is clearly not the same. This holds true for English and Spanish.

    The article mentions key examples of archaisms and speech patterns that are typical of the DR even today:

    o Seseo- both’ ‘Z’ and ‘S’ are pronounced the same (this is common in the Latin America not just the DR)

    o Intervocalic ‘D’- the article gives some key examples of the suprresed ‘d’ in Dominican speech (this also occurs in other regions of Latin America)

    o Dropping of the ‘S’

    o Concepts such as - carnavar instead of carnaval, hogal instead hogar and caminai instead of caminar (cibaeño)



    Keep in mind many of these concepts have to do with el nivel de escolaridad. The higher the level of education the less of these speech patterns you will hear in the DR and it does range in my experience.

    https://www.diariolibre.com/noticias...aor-LJDL328164



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    Last edited by Marianopolita; 04-14-2017 at 05:39 PM.

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    Default La jerga de la calle dominicana

    I am not one to be concerned about learning slang because in language in general it’s an aspect of speech one picks up along the way to a certain extent. When learning a language and Spanish in this case, it’s best to learn how to speak proper Spanish and the slang can be for fun afterwards once one has a solid command.

    Slang is worthy to know because you will hear it and there is a segment of the population that has a heavy slang vocabulary in some cases a predominant slang vocabulary. However, knowing some slang comes in handy and not to mention fun for some people. This jerga dominicana caught my attention because it’s so modern and as well, the accents of the two individuals really represent the Dominican popular speech or de la calle. The country has clearly marked accents (by region) and the accents in the video are true accents of just two of many that you will hear in the DR.





    These two guys in the video have it down pat and notice how they say at the end recuelden and not recuerden which is an example of the speech patterns addressed in the article in the post above.



    Cheers,

    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 04-14-2017 at 04:10 PM.

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    Default The usage of diminutives in Dominican speech

    I would like to add and it is quite an interesting aspect of Spanish (and not only part of Dominican speech) is diminutives and the usage. Observe the usage of diminutives in the Spanish-speaking world and you should stop and think- how fascinating!. Very unlike English, the usage and understanding the usage is special in Spanish.

    Some diminutives are more common than others. As well, the usage is (very) regional. Using common ones as an example – ito/ -ita you will hear in the Spanish-speaking world as well -ico/- ica. Then common in Spain -illo/- illa which is not common in Latin America at all. Costa Ricans get their nickname los Ticos because of their frequent usage of the diminutive -ico/ ica.

    As the articles state the meaning of -ito/-ita in the DR is usually to denote smallness or cariño but it does not always as we evidence in daily speech. Diminutives are common in Dominican speech but I will even extend it and say in Latin America in general to the point where they are even added to adverbs like ahorita (not in Spain) with various meanings depending on the context and country.



    Here are interesting articles from a Dominican newspaper that discuss the usage of diminutives in Dominican popular speech:

    http://eldia.com.do/los-diminutivos-...-dominicano-i/

    http://eldia.com.do/los-diminutivos-...dominicano-ii/

    http://eldia.com.do/los-diminutivos-...inicano-y-iii/


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    Nitido, 

    Gracias

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    The higher the level of education the less of these speech patterns you will hear in the DR . . .

    It all puts me in mind of a month I spent in Costa Rica in the year 2000. For my first week I went to the Pura Vida language school in Heredia. But I just did that in the mornings. The afternoons I spent in the Plaza de Armes talking to the old men, and in the bars talking to whoever. At the end of the one-week course (and before I set out to explore Costa Rica) I was presented with the certificate and with a special mention for my command of el idioma de calle.

    Two interesting aspects of castellano costaricense were:

    1. They did not use the familiar tu form (whereas most new-world idioms overuse it)

    2. They did not conjugate the future tense (suited me fine to say "I am going to . . ." rather than fiddle with verb endings)

    wbr

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    Quote Originally Posted by Me_again View Post
    The higher the level of education the less of these speech patterns you will hear in the DR . . .

    It all puts me in mind of a month I spent in Costa Rica in the year 2000. For my first week I went to the Pura Vida language school in Heredia. But I just did that in the mornings. The afternoons I spent in the Plaza de Armes talking to the old men, and in the bars talking to whoever. At the end of the one-week course (and before I set out to explore Costa Rica) I was presented with the certificate and with a special mention for my command of el idioma de calle.

    Two interesting aspects of castellano costaricense were:

    1. They did not use the familiar tu form (whereas most new-world idioms overuse it)

    2. They did not conjugate the future tense (suited me fine to say "I am going to . . ." rather than fiddle with verb endings)

    wbr

    The reason why the form of the verb was not used is because Costa Rica is voseo country. Was that not mentioned to you in the school you went to? To a certain extent foreigners (especially in Costa Rica) need to be aware of this form of address. It’s the informal ‘you’ just like but the verb forms differ in the present tense. Costa Ricans meaning entre ellos don’t use the form. Foreigners can because they are not expected to know voseo forms but one Costa Rican to another is not used.

    Voseo usage is the absolute linguistic currency in Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay. However, in some areas you will hear a mix like in Montevideo. Speakers either use pure voseo usage meaning vos + a verb conjugated in the voseo form or tú + a voseo conjugated verb form. Then there are pockets of voseo usage in many other Latin American countries such as Chile, Colombia, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Bolivia just to name a few. The voseo usage did not make it to the Caribbean per se (and if it’s there now that would be of a more recent linguistic drift). If someone in the Spanish-speaking world speaks to you using forms like vos sos, vos decís etc. you can narrow down where the person is from via voseo usage and then the accent.

    I can’t comment on the lack of the usage of the future tense since I have not had much exposure to Spanish spoken in Costa Rica. In general, I know Spanish in Costa Rica varies because of their history which definitely influenced the spoken language. The afro costarricense element is huge and adds to the diversity of their speech patterns. If you stayed in San José the vernacular is different from Limón for example which has a significant afro Caribbean presence thus influencing the speech patterns which is very similar to Panama. I have watched dialogue and listened to Costa Ricans talk about their history online in Spanish and it’s fascinating and consistent with what I have read.


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    Last edited by Marianopolita; 04-15-2017 at 09:14 PM.

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    The reason why the tú form of the verb was not used is because Costa Rica is voseo country . . .

    Fascinating!

    wbr

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    In Colombia (or maybe its just in the Medellin areas) they also voseo.

    One of my exes was Nicaraguan and yep, more voseo.

    I find it extremely annoying. lol

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    I can’t comment on the lack of the usage of the future tense since I have not had much exposure to Spanish spoken in Costa Rica. In general, I know Spanish in Costa Rica varies because of their history which definitely influenced the spoken language. The afro costarricense element is huge and adds to the diversity of their speech patterns. If you stayed in San José the vernacular is different from Limón for example which has a significant afro Caribbean presence thus influencing the speech patterns which is very similar to Panama. I have watched dialogue and listened to Costa Ricans talk about their history online in Spanish and it’s fascinating and consistent with what I have read.


    -MP.
    The 'Afro' presence in those countries is mostly Jamaican in origin, taken there in the late 19th and early 20th centuries mainly by the British and Americans as cheap work force for the banana and other types of plantations along the Caribbean coasts. They are the Cocolos of Central America, because the Americans were the one's that introduced in the DR the Afros from the English islands due to them speaking English, which made managing the labor force in the mostly American owned sugar plantations a little easier. The Spanish spoken in those areas could very well have more of an English influence, given the mother tongue of the people taken there by foreigners or non-Central Americans.

    The Africans that were taken to Central America by the Spanish was mainly in the 1500's and, similar to what happened in Mexico which in the 16th century was one of the major centers of African population in this hemisphere, through the centuries they simply mixed with the local and growing mestizo population. Enough time has gone by that the African element from colonial times has simply melted into the populace, appearing with a facial feature here or there that most people tend to ignore as possibly of African origin and, of course, the DNA studies that show the African presence in the veins of the average Central American.

    Had it not been for the British/American 'intervention' along the Caribbean coasts of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Honduras; and along Caribbean coast and the canal zone of Panama, those countries today wouldn't have a visible minority of people with clear African features.

    But, I'm no linguist, just throwing darts at a board to see what sticks.
    Last edited by NALs; 04-16-2017 at 02:59 PM.

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