View Poll Results: Do you regret moving to the Dominican Republic?

Voters
73. You may not vote on this poll
  • Absolutely

    12 16.44%
  • Somewhat

    6 8.22%
  • A little

    7 9.59%
  • No

    46 63.01%
  • Not sure

    2 2.74%
Page 14 of 14 FirstFirst ... 4121314
Results 131 to 134 of 134

Thread: Do you regret moving to the Dominican Republic?

  1. #131
    Silver
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    4,497
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianMik View Post
    Puerto Plata.
    I live here now a bit more then 3 years.*
    Have my money placed in the bank so that I can live out of my interests that they pay me every month and I have a house in Belgium that people are paying me rent for. So if I ever decide to go back, I will still have my money.
    It is perfect here for people who have money, I know a couple of people here that live from the interests that the banks pay.
    Not many at age 33 can afford to leave their home country to "retire" to the DR. You say you live off your interest? You must have a decent amount of Euros in the bank to be able to do that. Most people coming to the DR these days, are of retirement age and have enough assets to live comfortably. By retirement age I mean 55-65 years old not 33. You are very fortunate to be in this position.

  2. Likes markryan liked this post
  3. #132
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Do you regret moving to the Dominican Republic

    Quote Originally Posted by jefe de la finca View Post
    My only regret was being so far from family the day my Dad passed away.

    1. Country bumpkin from the UK
    2. 6.5 years
    3. Acclimatized well and learned long ago that trying to keep up with the locals when it gets hot is futile for this gringo. AC, what's that? Campo style cooling is open doors and windows, the shade of a tree or sitting in the river with a Presidente.
    4. Cooked and not moving works for me every time. I like Dominican food be it in a good restaurant (a rare treat) or having a meal with the workers that has been cooked campo style in the shade of a mango tree. I do miss English real ale and admit to smuggling Marmite into the country.
    5. No Spanish when I first arrived but picked it up relatively quickly. It's not perfect (call it semi fluent) but learning is an on going process and is good enough to make myself understood.
    6. From the orderly roads of the UK to what seemed to be the live set of Death Race 2000 was a big culture shock. Having to get used to things being on the 'wrong' side (steering wheel, traffic) while getting to grips with the apparent free for all road rules was stressful for a while. I'm used to it now and chug along with inner peace at my own pace in a beat up pickup truck. However it's always in defensive mode just in case the next idiot moto, taxi, Mack truck or jay walking farm animal or human is just around the next corner planning to mess up my day.
    I have been living here for almost 30 years, of course, there are things that are not to my liking, but that can be said for anywhere in the world. I have no problems with the food, I am a vegetarian. Everything in terms of food can be found here in the mayor supermarkets or the wayside venders. I only buy drinking water in the colmados, as they deliver. Any country in which one has to live, it is best to master the language and cultural habits. This country has come a long way in development since my arrival. The only thing that is really bad now is the crime. That is of course a world wide problem. The local people are very warm and friendly, sometimes a little too much. The public transport is better than in some other countries, there is always room for improvement. I'd rather not say what country I came from. Life here can be good, if one has a good income, or just live within one's means, I have no regrets.

  4. #133
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    105
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LTSteve View Post
    Not many at age 33 can afford to leave their home country to "retire" to the DR. You say you live off your interest? You must have a decent amount of Euros in the bank to be able to do that. Most people coming to the DR these days, are of retirement age and have enough assets to live comfortably. By retirement age I mean 55-65 years old not 33. You are very fortunate to be in this position.
    Yes, I was lucky that I bought my first house when the prices in Belgium where really low (sold it 10 years later for 3 times the price, but I could only do this because I started working really young, even when I went to university, when my friends where always out, going to parties etc, but thanks to that I had 3 houses at the age of 33, all payed for) and the luck that I got a really big bonus when I quit my job.
    I know most people don't get to be that lucky.

  5. #134
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    538
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    That's not luck Mik, I know Belgians (lived there for 12 years) as very hard workers.

  6. Likes Garyexpat, BelgianMik liked this post
Page 14 of 14 FirstFirst ... 4121314

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO