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Thread: Landlord wants to sell the house I live in, are there any rules that protect me?

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    Lightbulb Landlord wants to sell the house I live in, are there any rules that protect me?

    Hello everyone,

    I've lived in the house mentioned above for 4 years now. I have always paid rent very faithfully for the last 4 years and have never been late. My original contract for this apartment was made 4 years ago in the month of August, and it was made renewable based on mutual agreement. The legal language used on the contract states "prórroga por tacita reconduccion".

    The landlord did not have the title to sell. About 2 weeks ago, the landlord finally obtained the title to the house and came to visit one day without prior notice, and put up a for-sale sign on my second floor balcony withough my permission. Someone else lives on the first floor, but he did not put up a sign on the first floor.

    That day, the landlord informed me that if the new owners want to buy the house to move into, I'll have to vacate the house, and they'll return my deposit and give me the 1 month rent to pay for a new place that I will have to move into. If the new owners want to rent, I'll have to renegotiate the rental terms with the new owners.

    Today I received a message from the landlord asking me to allow them to bring a prospective buyer to show my second floor apartment. The landlord has pictures of my apartment from 4 years ago when he was trying to rent the apartment. Am I obligated by law to open my doors and allow the landlord and whoever they bring to show my place? I did not answer the messages or the phone and so the landlord was unable to show the house yet. He has been insistent in trying to contact me, but I'd like to know the rules involved.

    Are there any rules that protect me? Can the landlord ask me to leave within 2 months, or is there a timeline that is set by law?

    Any advice on this matter will be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by melagomania View Post
    Hello everyone,

    I've lived in the house mentioned above for 4 years now. I have always paid rent very faithfully for the last 4 years and have never been late. My original contract for this apartment was made 4 years ago in the month of August, and it was made renewable based on mutual agreement. The legal language used on the contract states "prórroga por tacita reconduccion".

    The landlord did not have the title to sell. About 2 weeks ago, the landlord finally obtained the title to the house and came to visit one day without prior notice, and put up a for-sale sign on my second floor balcony withough my permission. Someone else lives on the first floor, but he did not put up a sign on the first floor.

    That day, the landlord informed me that if the new owners want to buy the house to move into, I'll have to vacate the house, and they'll return my deposit and give me the 1 month rent to pay for a new place that I will have to move into. If the new owners want to rent, I'll have to renegotiate the rental terms with the new owners.

    Today I received a message from the landlord asking me to allow them to bring a prospective buyer to show my second floor apartment. The landlord has pictures of my apartment from 4 years ago when he was trying to rent the apartment. Am I obligated by law to open my doors and allow the landlord and whoever they bring to show my place? I did not answer the messages or the phone and so the landlord was unable to show the house yet. He has been insistent in trying to contact me, but I'd like to know the rules involved.

    Are there any rules that protect me? Can the landlord ask me to leave within 2 months, or is there a timeline that is set by law?

    Any advice on this matter will be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you.
    Number one, talk to a lawyer.

    Number two, read your contract. *It should be in there.

    Number three, I can tell you what is common in the contracts in the east, but that won't matter - you need facts.

    You might want to post this in Legal to get a better answer. *A lawyer monitors that section.

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    I am moving this thread to the Legal Forum. Hopefully, Sr. Guzman will answer this query.

    I ask that members not add their 2 cents in this thread, unless you are linking to a page with the law spelled out.




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    Quote Originally Posted by beeza View Post
    Why don't you buy the house? You can stay as long as you like then.

    Don't you think it's a little unreasonable that a tenant can dictate as to what an owner does with their property?
    They aren't saying he can't sell it, they want to know the law about allowing realtors/prospective buyers into their apartment while they are living there, i.e. can the tenant dictate a convenient time ...... or can they come in whenever they want.

    Again, this is the Legal Forum. If you're not posting a link to a law that answers the OP, do not post.
    Last edited by AlterEgo; 11-18-2016 at 06:34 PM.




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    Hoping Mr. Guzman chimes in shortly.

    In most states in the U.S., the LL can sell at any time, but the new buyer is subject to the terms of the lease. If the tenant is on a month to month, as seems to be the case here, then 30 days' notice is all that is generally required.

    There's generally a clause in most U.S. leases that allows a LL to show a rented unit. That said, many leases have provisions requiring 24 hours notice. As a practical matter, it would seem you'd want to work with your tenant, as you don't want them sabotaging your showing.
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    It sounds like the tenant no longer has the landlord's "mutual consent", that might negate the terms of the rental contract for renewal.

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    The tenant is protected from eviction unless a clause in the lease says otherwise.
    Fabio J. Guzman
    Guzman Ariza
    Attorneys-at-Law
    Sosúa, Santo Domingo, San Francisco de Macorís, Cabrera
    Las Terrenas, Samaná, Bávaro (Punta Cana) and La Romana
    Dominican Republic


    info@drlawyer.com


    Website

    The opinion above should not be construed to be formal legal advice and was given without reviewing the facts and documents pertinent to the case. The reader should NOT act based upon this opinion without seeking professional counsel.

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    (I know it's not a link, but I have personal experience here)

    I had language inserted into my lease that, if the villa is sold, I have at least 90 days to find another place to live from the date of the deposit being placed. That gave me time to wait out high season if needed to get an available long-term rental. Obviously this has to be done when the lease is initiated; after the fact is too late. But anyone reading this that's about to sign a lease should at least ask the question before putting ink to paper.

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    Quote Originally Posted by melagomania View Post
    Hello everyone,

    I've lived in the house mentioned above for 4 years now. I have always paid rent very faithfully for the last 4 years and have never been late. My original contract for this apartment was made 4 years ago in the month of August, and it was made renewable based on mutual agreement. The legal language used on the contract states "pr�rroga por tacita reconduccion".

    The landlord did not have the title to sell. About 2 weeks ago, the landlord finally obtained the title to the house and came to visit one day without prior notice, and put up a for-sale sign on my second floor balcony withough my permission. Someone else lives on the first floor, but he did not put up a sign on the first floor.

    That day, the landlord informed me that if the new owners want to buy the house to move into, I'll have to vacate the house, and they'll return my deposit and give me the 1 month rent to pay for a new place that I will have to move into. If the new owners want to rent, I'll have to renegotiate the rental terms with the new owners.

    Today I received a message from the landlord asking me to allow them to bring a prospective buyer to show my second floor apartment. The landlord has pictures of my apartment from 4 years ago when he was trying to rent the apartment. Am I obligated by law to open my doors and allow the landlord and whoever they bring to show my place? I did not answer the messages or the phone and so the landlord was unable to show the house yet. He has been insistent in trying to contact me, but I'd like to know the rules involved.

    Are there any rules that protect me? Can the landlord ask me to leave within 2 months, or is there a timeline that is set by law?

    Any advice on this matter will be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you.
    I'm a little concerned about your behavior, firstly and just to remind you... it is his property and he therefore has the right to do as he wishes with it. Within the confines of the law that is

    From my years of being a land lord i was required by law to give the current renter 24-48 hours notice before entering the property. In fact, all of my renters were very compliant and the viewings went smoothly. It very well may be true that you should have to re-negotiate a contract...and why not? It's not like you own the place. However in my country, the rental agreement is allowed to run it's due course despite property ownership changes.

    I'm not sure of the DR real estate laws that pertain to property entry, but to my mind the owner really had no right, to enter this rented apartment ...what if you were in the shower or in bed with Jose or Liliana???

    You stated; "Today I received a message from the landlord asking me to allow them to bring a prospective buyer to show my second floor apartment". So even when the owner DOES elect to contact you and prearrange a viewing you IGNORE him. What a contrary selfish person you are. There is just no pleasing you , is there? I get the feeling that you believe that you own the property...wake up sunshine....you don't.

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    Quote Originally Posted by melagomania View Post
    Hello everyone,

    I've lived in the house mentioned above for 4 years now. I have always paid rent very faithfully for the last 4 years and have never been late. My original contract for this apartment was made 4 years ago in the month of August, and it was made renewable based on mutual agreement. The legal language used on the contract states "pr�rroga por tacita reconduccion".

    The landlord did not have the title to sell. About 2 weeks ago, the landlord finally obtained the title to the house and came to visit one day without prior notice, and put up a for-sale sign on my second floor balcony withough my permission. Someone else lives on the first floor, but he did not put up a sign on the first floor.

    That day, the landlord informed me that if the new owners want to buy the house to move into, I'll have to vacate the house, and they'll return my deposit and give me the 1 month rent to pay for a new place that I will have to move into. If the new owners want to rent, I'll have to renegotiate the rental terms with the new owners.

    Today I received a message from the landlord asking me to allow them to bring a prospective buyer to show my second floor apartment. The landlord has pictures of my apartment from 4 years ago when he was trying to rent the apartment. Am I obligated by law to open my doors and allow the landlord and whoever they bring to show my place? I did not answer the messages or the phone and so the landlord was unable to show the house yet. He has been insistent in trying to contact me, but I'd like to know the rules involved.

    Are there any rules that protect me? Can the landlord ask me to leave within 2 months, or is there a timeline that is set by law?

    Any advice on this matter will be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you.
    Are you kidding? The problem with tenants in this county (like you) is that they think they own the place they live in. The current owner and buyer appear to be reasonable people and if you are on a month to month (as it appears you are) why not find a new place to live and move? They offered you a one month time frame but it would be fair and reasonable to ask for up to 3 months and or the cash equivalent. Seeking anything more than that is in my opinion criminal.

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