Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst ... 789
Results 81 to 87 of 87

Thread: Why Don't Spanish Speaking People NEVER Wanna Speak to me?

  1. #81
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,790
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    Quebec French is a variation of French just like Dominican Spanish is a variation of Spanish. At first it may be hard to understand if you are not used to it. However, if your ear is trained- pan comido. The cook can communicate because if she speaks French it's the same language! As well, she may have have lived in Quebec for a few years.


    -MP.


    That's very true!  Spanish is Spanish everywhere.  I haven't met that native Spanish speaker that I can't understand or communicate with without any problem.

    Here in the USA I have friends from all over Latin American and we all understand each other perfectly.   If one person used a colloquialism from their country we just ask what that mean if it not clear from the conversation we are having.

    I used to work with a Pakistani guy and he spoke decent Spanish and we talked to him in Spanish and joked in Spanish with him.  
    Once a guy from coastal Hondura was hired and he spoke Spanish faster than lighting and he had a accent and weird sound.  Of course all the Latinos at work understood him with no problem.  The Pakistani why ask us in Spanish:  He is not speaking
    Spanish?   He couldn't understand a word that the Honduran guy was speaking.  All the Latinos in the room told, yes he is.  He was confused because he couldn't understand and we (Latinos) could.

    I also met a guy from Equatorial Guinea in Africa and we understood each other perfectly.

  2. #82
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    676
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    I also wanted to comment on your point about 'in the USA speaking another language is still not appealing.' Actually it's pathetic and especially when it comes to Spanish which is the official second language and globally the second most spoken language. The US' concept towards languages other than English is an embarrassment. Those in the US who are bilingual or do speak a second language have an advantage and should it see as a privilege although the perception globally when an American can speak a foreign language is total shock.


    -MP.
    I definitely understand your point, but I am going to play devils advocate. USA is a country built literally on free labor of African Americans following the migration of Europeans who eventually learnt English. It is modus operandi for immigrants to learn the language of the country they now call home. Why should Americans of all backgrounds and Latinos have to bend backwards to learn Spanish while it should be the new arrivals job to integrate? Spanish is the official second language globally but it isn't economically, yet. Why would any American want their tax paying dollars focus on one group of people? What about the Chinese,Indian, Polish, and non Spanish speaking communities?

    Also I find Latinos aren't globally and have tunnel vision as much as Americans. They don't want to learn about other cultures. They only travel back to their home country and haven't grown outside of their comfort zone. Besides South Americans from mostly Argentina, Chile, Venezuela and a small group of Colombians, their perception of the global sphere is very dim. Unfortunately,the majority Central Americans and Caribbean Spanish speaking population are still lingering in the dark ages due to lack of proper education albeit; there is exception to this stereotype.

    Those that are bilingual do have an advantage but a disadvantage for Americans and non Spanish speaking community in their own country. I find some Hispanics are very arrogant now when they can't find someone to speak in their language as if someone owe them this service, it's a courtesy. This is the main reason why USA has a Head of State fomenting hatred out of fear of the citizens losing their privileged status . Even the assumption of bilingual automatically meaning English/Spanish is erroneous. There are many bilingual X language/English speaking Americans. America needs to EEO for all.

    Also, due to globalisation America will need to catch up to the rest of the world when it comes to communicating in a language other than English.

    P.S. thanks for the recommendations, I actually read P. Juan Gutierrez "Trilogia sucia de la Habana" which depicts the raw side of the Cuban populace. Isabelle Allende is a great writer, who has a way of making her stories come to life. I also find her command of the Spanish language to be very magical and coming to life. Another observation is unfortunately Dominican Republic doesn't have a renowned writer besides Junot Diaz who doesn't write in Spanish. Do you have an idea of this hypothesis. Thanks again.

  3. Likes AlterEgo, Fulano2 liked this post
  4. #83
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,056
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Very accurate Quisqueya! 

  5. #84
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,078
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Quisqueya

    I went back and read my post. I did not say Americans have to learn Spanish. All I said which is already known is that it is the official second language of the USA. The numbers speak for themselves. Therefore, you are not playing the devil's advocate. We have had these conversations before and you understand my point very well. The devil's advocate is for other posters who are reading your posts  for the first time. In fact, my point is also about the fact that the USA is not really accepting of any 'foreign' language. It is the melting  pot ideology. Some people are for it and some are not. 


    I will comment on the reading shortly.

    -MP.

    Moderator Spanish Forum
    www.DR1.com

  6. Likes Quisqueya liked this post
  7. #85
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,056
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yes but a melting pot must have something in common....in this case English. Learn from the problems in Europe. Third generations north-africans not finding a job because of their lack of Dutch or german for instance.

  8. #86
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,078
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Quisqueya View Post
    ....P.S. thanks for the recommendations, I actually read P. Juan Gutierrez "Trilogia sucia de la Habana" which depicts the raw side of the Cuban populace. Isabelle Allende is a great writer, who has a way of making her stories come to life. I also find her command of the Spanish language to be very magical and coming to life. Another observation is unfortunately Dominican Republic doesn't have a renowned writer besides Junot Diaz who doesn't write in Spanish. Do you have an idea of this hypothesis. Thanks again.
    Getting back to you on this aspect of your post. If I am not mistaken I was the one who recommended Gutiérrez to you. His books reflect Cuba of the 1990's when the country really took a turn for the worst economically when the Soviet Union collapsed. Según Gutiérrez fueron los peores años en Cuba and he does not try to hide it in his books. One may not like the way he writes but he too has a good command of Spanish just different from the typical top ten Spanish writers.

    Isabel Allende's literature is known as realismo mágico and I agree she could write and her books as well are not for everybody. Yes, one has to have a good command of Spanish to read her work. It's like in French one has to have a good command to read Albert Camus and Jean-Paul Sartre just to name two authors.

    As I keep saying there is no shortage of good Spanish literature one just needs to have time to tap into it. I will be reading some of Mario Vargas LLosa's work within the next few months.

    Regarding Dominican authors Junot does not count in my opinion when it comes to Spanish literature because he does not write in Spanish. In terms of Dominican writers in general that are renowned you are right it's lacking per se. In comparison to other Spanish-speaking countries the DR has not thrown its hat in the arena. Basically, you need someone to tell the story and that could be the root of the problem.


    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 03-26-2017 at 07:52 PM.

    Moderator Spanish Forum
    www.DR1.com

  9. #87
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    676
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    Getting back to you on this aspect of your post. If I am not mistaken I was the one who recommended Gutiérrez to you. His books reflect Cuba of the 1990's when the country really took a turn for the worst economically when the Soviet Union collapsed. Según Gutiérrez fueron los peores años en Cuba and he does not try to hide it in his books. One may not like the way he writes but he too has a good command of Spanish just different from the typical top ten Spanish writers.

    Isabel Allende's literature is known as realismo mágico and I agree she could write and her books as well are not for everybody. Yes, one has to have a good command of Spanish to read her work. It's like in French one has to have a good command to read Albert Camus and Jean-Paul Sartre just to name two authors.

    As I keep saying there is no shortage of good Spanish literature one just needs to have time to tap into it. I will be reading some of Mario Vargas LLosa's work within the next few months.

    Regarding Dominican authors Junot does not count in my opinion when it comes to Spanish literature because he does not write in Spanish. In terms of Dominican writers in general that are renowned you are right it's lacking per se. In comparison to other Spanish-speaking countries the DR has not thrown its hat in the arena. Basically, you need someone to tell the story and that could be the root of the problem.


    -MP.

    You're not mistaken, indeed, you recommended this jewel to me many years ago. Thank you again for such a great read. I really enjoyed his book. His writing style transplanted me to Habana walking along the malecon. Llosa's writing doesn't appeal to me nor does his stories captivate me. All of his books come off as an upper class Peruvian descendants of Spanish immigrants conquering the mestizos of Latin America. He comes off too pretentious for me. I am seeking less known writers who often don't get the merit they deserve. Spanish literature is indeed vast but it is always the same writers getting the publicity,imo. Thanks for your insight and your passion for el idioma castellano. I hope the OP find some solace in our messages. I would say, just practice with people you know that can improve your Spanish. Good Luck!!

  10. Likes Marianopolita liked this post
Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst ... 789

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO