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Thread: Why Don't Spanish Speaking People NEVER Wanna Speak to me?

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chirimoya View Post
    Certain words in one language simply express a concept better. This example has been used before, but "empalagoso" to describe a food or a person is the best example I can think of. There are words in English like rich, cloying, sickly-sweet, overpowering, smarmy, oily... but none of them sum up the notion as effectively as "empalagoso". That's why, if I'm with another bilingual speaker, I might find myself saying "that person is so... empalagoso" or "this cake is too... empalagoso".

    There is also so-called alingualism in immigrant communities where acquisition of each language is incomplete: the "home" language (e.g. Spanish for Latino immigrants to the US) is not adequate for many concepts they need to express in the wider world (education, workplace, officialdom), and when out in the wider world they have not been exposed to so much of the "home" vocabulary so when discussing something domestic in English they might struggle to find the words for common household items. In an informal setting with their peers it is understandable that they sometimes switch/insert words in the other language depending on context.
    My favorite in that category is vacuum cleaniando! It takes someone who is at least un poco bilingual to understand it, but it flies.
    Der Fish

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuillermoRamon View Post
    Which also leads into the fact, some words, in some languages, do not have a translation.
    Link to Twenty listicles about words that have no translation
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  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chirimoya View Post
    There is also so-called alingualism in immigrant communities where acquisition of each language is incomplete: the "home" language (e.g. Spanish for Latino immigrants to the US) is not adequate for many concepts they need to express in the wider world (education, workplace, officialdom), and when out in the wider world they have not been exposed to so much of the "home" vocabulary so when discussing something domestic in English they might struggle to find the words for common household items. In an informal setting with their peers it is understandable that they sometimes switch/insert words in the other language depending on context.
    I minored in Spanish in the US, I was surpised to find out that many of my classmates were Latinos. At the time, it made no sense, but now that I am raising kids who speak a different language at home, I totally understand. My kids can barely read in French and and when they attempt to do so, they sound 1000% American (which is funny to me, because they have no accent otherwise). So, now, I understand that they may have to take classes to be fully bilingual. I believe that their acquisition of English is similar to their peers though (at least I hope so, lol).

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by SantiagoDR View Post
    Darn, no wonder I have so much trouble communicating with Dominicans.
    For years I have been trying to speak Spanish with them instead of "DOMINICAN".
    That's why I say in my resume that I am fluent in 27 languages, Dominican, Mexican, Guatemalan, Columbian, etc.....

  5. #55
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    Being of mostly English, Dutch and Irish blood, I don't really look Dominican, but I do speak Spanish fluently, as I have a several degrees in it and taught Spanish for 40 years, I do not have this problem. Everyone seems to understand me. I don't always understand Dominicans because they use different words for some things that I still am not familiar with.

    I think people respond in English because they want to make sure you understand them.

    Understanding a language is not the same thing as speaking it. Or perhaps they want to be courteous.

    No one speaks English much in Barahona. It is not as cosmopolitan as SD or even Juan Dolio or Sam Pablo.

  6. #56
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    A good example of bilingualism in popular music, Reggaeton, is Atrevete, Te, Te. by Calle 13. Easy to access if you have Pandora. 

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Africaida View Post
    Yes, I understood what you meant , I was just giving another context in the US of a linguistic "faux pas" As far as the OP is concern, it must be frustrating, but she should keep trying.

    Yes, everyone speaks French in Guadeloupe, but among themselves (in less formal setting), they speak creole.
    Thanks for confirming that they speak French because that is what I also knew. As well, the creole they speak is understood in all of the French-speaking Caribbean countries and also French Guiana. For example, Les Martiniquais speak the same creole from what I have been told and the islands are close to each other so it makes sense.

    BTW- Just as a side have you ever read any literature written by Maryse Condé (Guadelopue) or Patrick Chamoiseau (Martiniquais)? Give them a try. I don’t think you will be disappointed. It’s great Afro French Caribbean literature.



    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 03-21-2017 at 10:57 PM.

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  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derfish View Post
    My favorite in that category is vacuum cleaniando! It takes someone who is at least un poco bilingual to understand it, but it flies.
    Der Fish
    This would pass in the USA but not in a Spanish-speaking country. There is a way but due to the lack of knowledge of the proper vocabulary you get these inventions. I like the real way pasar la aspiradora.

    -MP.

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  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chirimoya View Post
    Certain words in one language simply express a concept better. This example has been used before, but "empalagoso" to describe a food or a person is the best example I can think of. There are words in English like rich, cloying, sickly-sweet, overpowering, smarmy, oily... but none of them sum up the notion as effectively as "empalagoso". That's why, if I'm with another bilingual speaker, I might find myself saying "that person is so... empalagoso" or "this cake is too... empalagoso".

    There is also so-called alingualism in immigrant communities where acquisition of each language is incomplete: the "home" language (e.g. Spanish for Latino immigrants to the US) is not adequate for many concepts they need to express in the wider world (education, workplace, officialdom), and when out in the wider world they have not been exposed to so much of the "home" vocabulary so when discussing something domestic in English they might struggle to find the words for common household items. In an informal setting with their peers it is understandable that they sometimes switch/insert words in the other language depending on context.



    Muy interesante.


    -MP.

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  10. #60
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    Esta pipa necesita hueldeando. ~ This pipe needs welding.



    Ay nos estamos huacheando.~See you. Tengo que llevar a la huifa a la groseria~ I have to take my wife to the grocery. .


    Nuevo Mexico Spanglish.

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