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Thread: El español dominicano

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fulano2 View Post
    That's quite a long sentence...
    Yes but I quite liked it and actually I was not talking exclusively about slang either .I have travelled a lot to various latin countries andI think that the spanish of the DR people in general is quite unique. The biggest problem I have is understanding some young people speaking their spanish whereas I have absolutely no problem con los viejos como yo

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kipling333 View Post
    Yes but I quite liked it and actually I was not talking exclusively about slang either .I have travelled a lot to various latin countries andI think that the spanish of the DR people in general is quite unique. The biggest problem I have is understanding some young people speaking their spanish whereas I have absolutely no problem con los viejos como yo
    this is very true i too have traveled alot, the only places that come close to our accent would be the spanish spoken in eastern cuba (oriente), barlovento-venezuela, and some isolated pockets of some afro populations in colombia and panama

    humeriously some mexican told me that we speak a Jamaican Spanish version lol

  4. #23
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    Default 'The Sweet Sounds of the Caribbean'

    To add more detail to this thread, I found an interesting blog article written by a language company whose information I have read before about the varieties of Spanish. However, this is the first time I have come across this one and it’s a gem.

    What is written in their Spanish language blog is consistent with my readings not to mention the importance of understanding that many of the features mentioned are heard across what is considered to be the Caribbean Spanish-speaking countries and not just the Dominican Republic. Similar to what I pointed out in my second post in this thread. The first three features as per the article are not only heard in Dominican Spanish. They are heard in other parts of Latin America as well which this blog also mentions.



    http://blogs.transparent.com/spanish...bbean-spanish/


    This is a recommended read (and a treat for anyone who likes rhythmic authentically sounding Cuban salsa). Every time I read commentaries like this one and information about the varieties of the spoken language my thoughts are the same. Learn standard Spanish, build your foundation and expose yourself to as many of the varieties as you can and you will grasp the language. What you don’t understand ask. Trying to learn one variety will limit you. Slang is just that slang. If you catch it great if you don’t speak normal Spanish.





    Good salsa, Caribbean Spanish, Caribbean rhythm. ¡Qué chévere!

    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 05-29-2017 at 10:19 PM.

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  6. #24
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    Love that song MP !!!!!!!!!!!

    Again I am a Timba fan.

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    somos canarios todos

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Africaida View Post
    Love that song MP !!!!!!!!!!!

    Again I am a Timba fan.
    Yes, it's good timba and there are so many other good ones both old and new of the Cuban genre.


    Going back to what the article mentions about Caribbean Spanish and songs. It is a great way to train your ear for those who say Caribbean Spanish is difficult to understand. 

    Es una buena oportunidad de aprender y practicar el idioma.


    -MP.

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  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    Yes, it's good timba and there are so many other good ones both old and new of the Cuban genre.


    Going back to what the article mentions about Caribbean Spanish and songs. It is a great way to train your ear for those who say Caribbean Spanish is difficult to understand. 

    Es una buena oportunidad de aprender y practicar el idioma.


    -MP.
    would u say that caribbean spanish is similar to the anglo & franco caribbean dialects since they have similar history than us including up to having a specific european origin, for example, all caribbean english speakers have their base in Hiberno English which is the English spoken in Southern Ireland such as Cork, very very similar sounding to the point where a jamaican may be mistaken for a local there, and all franco caribbean french have their base in Normandi French and they get taken for a local as well but with minor differences which would be the African languages and some others

  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominicanese View Post
    would u say that caribbean spanish is similar to the anglo & franco caribbean dialects since they have similar history than us including up to having a specific european origin, for example, all caribbean english speakers have their base in Hiberno English which is the English spoken in Southern Ireland such as Cork, very very similar sounding to the point where a jamaican may be mistaken for a local there, and all franco caribbean french have their base in Normandi French and they get taken for a local as well but with minor differences which would be the African languages and some others
    I have no idea. The historial aspects of Caribbean English and French are not my areas of expertise but I have noted that I can perceive and differentiate like radar a Caribbean French speaker from let's say a West African French speaker. Different rhythm, different intonation.


    -MP.

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  13. #29
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    As a general comment when discussing features of Caribbean Spanish it's not only about the accent and pronunciation of the words that make its Spanish unique. There are many grammatical patterns that are atypical and considered incorrect by academic and purist standards. However, they persist as part of the vernacular of the Caribbean. Research often compares the three Caribbean nations, Cuba, DR and PR in this regard because all three have the same grammatical speech patterns in common. Vocabulary differs because of historical factors but each nation has its share of vocabulary that dates back to colonization.


    -MP.

    Moderator Spanish Forum
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  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    As a general comment when discussing features of Caribbean Spanish it's not only about the accent and pronunciation of the words that make its Spanish unique. There are many grammatical patterns that are atypical and considered incorrect by academic and purist standards. However, they persist as part of the vernacular of the Caribbean. Research often compares the three Caribbean nations, Cuba, DR and PR in this regard because all three have the same grammatical speech patterns in common. Vocabulary differs because of historical factors but each nation has its share of vocabulary that dates back to colonization.


    -MP.
    yeah we do, we all pretty much talk the same, main landers just say we all speak isleno or caribeno, since they cannot distinguish the 3 accents like we can due to the strong ties and similarities.

    but yes i have been interested and have done some researches and observing how the anglo caribbean speakers sound in comparison to us, theres alot of similarities not just in spanish but im gonna put this vid as an example, he does sound like your average hispanic speaking English, this Dominican man speaks english like a mix between a spanish speaker and caribbean english speaker or some sorta mix of that


    ^^ he kinna sounds caribbean english ^^

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