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Thread: Opening a small business

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by lifeisgreat View Post
    Just simply don't start any company here...you can't afford to be here don't ..don't you will be sorry! You can open pizza joint there are none here
    i heard some rumor that there is a guy toying with the futuristic idea of opening a bar, playing loud bachata, and having 3 or 4 chicas lazing around. it is worth a try...

  2. #22
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    As far as  copying a successful business model: there are four establishments that only sell French fries and juice within a two block radius on Calle El Conde; there's another one to open shortly within the same radius. But, the lines to buy French fries are often 20-30 customers deep. I would recommend that next to each of these you open a guaranteed-to-succeed weight-loss, back pain relief and diabetes control business.

  3. #23
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    Unless you are a real masochist, conducting business here is probably going to be an ongoing source of much discontent. Occasionally, when the pace of life is slower than usual, and I find myself staring at the reflection of the palm trees in the glass like surface of my pool, the entrepreneur in me contemplates a possibility or two.

    Limited available resources and a lagging manufacturing sector dictate this to be a service oriented economy. Over my years here, if I was interested in earning some cash, I believe I have latched onto a concept that will work. I'm not interested in working so I spent some of my idle time fleshing out the details of my idea until I shook my head and grabbed another beer.

    I believe to remain sane, and have any chance of being profitable for as long as the ride lasts and not end up being stuck with inventory, equipment and still having at least one shirt left to wear, small is the way to go.

    Low initial capital investment
    Low employee count as in none or one.
    No owned permanent infrastructure.
    Minimal equipment that is readily available for rent
    Easy and flexible location opportunities
    Scale-able - to be as busy or as greedy as you want and still have beach time everyday.
    Minimum permits and Govt oversight - just pay your taxes and the occasional extra convenience fee.
    The ability to easily relocate as often as becomes necessary.

    Maybe someday, but probably not for me.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cdn_Gringo View Post
    Unless you are a real masochist, conducting business here is probably going to be an ongoing source of much discontent. Occasionally, when the pace of life is slower than usual, and I find myself staring at the reflection of the palm trees in the glass like surface of my pool, the entrepreneur in me contemplates a possibility or two.

    Limited available resources and a lagging manufacturing sector dictate this to be a service oriented economy. Over my years here, if I was interested in earning some cash, I believe I have latched onto a concept that will work. I'm not interested in working so I spent some of my idle time fleshing out the details of my idea until I shook my head and grabbed another beer.

    I believe to remain sane, and have any chance of being profitable for as long as the ride lasts and not end up being stuck with inventory, equipment and still having at least one shirt left to wear, small is the way to go.

    Low initial capital investment
    Low employee count as in none or one.
    No owned permanent infrastructure.
    Minimal equipment that is readily available for rent
    Easy and flexible location opportunities
    Scale-able - to be as busy or as greedy as you want and still have beach time everyday.
    Minimum permits and Govt oversight - just pay your taxes and the occasional extra convenience fee.
    The ability to easily relocate as often as becomes necessary.

    Maybe someday, but probably not for me.
    people tend to overthink things, when the solutions are simple.

    Dominicans love chicken. they also love fried foods. put them together , and we have fried chicken.

    the USA is home to some people who produce the most spectacular Southern Fried Chicken on the planet. i maintain that if a guy opened a restaurant serving Southern Fried, with great french fries and buttermilk biscuits, he would make a fortune. instead, guys want to open full service restaurants, with a menu the length of your arm, selling meals that have to go for 400 pesos to break even, when they could be selling a 150 peso plate of chicken and fries, with a biscuit.

    really, people.

  5. #25
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    Hi dgaulin, as an expat who has a business here, I can tell you it is very difficult to get set up and comes with many frustrations and headaches, but is possible. As other posters have stated, I would not count on making a living from it but if you're only looking for something to keep you a little busy and make a few pesos then you can make a go of it. Working strictly for foreigners sounds like a good plan as my experience with Dominicans is not good in relation to their paying a fair price for quality. They will say they want quality but will still go with a super low price and accept inferior work (my experience). Good luck and hope to see you down here someday.

  6. #26
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    hello!

    I've been reading this thread because i'm considering to make the business i'm doing here in DR legal/official.
    I'm a language teacher. I'm teaching Dutch to Dominicans. (The government of my country (The Netherlands) have a rule that you can't apply for a residency with your Dutch partner without passing an Dutch language exam at the Dutch Embassy in Santo Domingo.) I'm doing quite well with my classes here in Santiago but my business is not (yet) officially registered here in DR.

    Therefore I'm wondering about the following:

    1. Is it allowed to work (your own business) and earn money IN the DR without the company being registered in DR (and as a consequence that not paying taxes in DR)
    2. How does it work with taxes in DR? Do I have to pay taxes ??(all the Dominicans I know say that I don't have to pay taxes and I should continue the way I'm doing now because 'nobody' pays taxes)
    3. If I would register my company.... how would that work and is it difficult? And... is it recommended? (or should I just continue the way i'm doing now?)

    I have a temporary residency that I'm renewing every year. I live in Santiago with my Dominican husband since 1,5 years.
    I'm a well organized person and always wants to be 'en dia'/up to date with everything (my documents etc) So I want to make sure that what I'm doing with the legal aspect of my business is done as it should be to avoid any problems.

    Thanks for your help/advice! It's really appreciated!

    All the best,
    Nucita

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