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Thread: Is the DR a good place to raise children: JUST FOR THE LADIES.

  1. #1
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    Default Is the DR a good place to raise children: JUST FOR THE LADIES.

    This was published in today's DR News.

    Dominican Republic ranks 120/172 in Save the Children Index
    A report on childhood in the world in 2017 issued by Save the Children has concerning figures about the dangers and threats facing the children in the Dominican Republic. Save the Children’s new global report, “2017 End of Childhood Report: Stolen Childhoods” looks into the “childhood enders”– events and factors that rob children of their childhoods, such as child marriage, infant mortality, extreme violence and displacement by war or conflict.
    The report indicates that the well-being of children in the DR are being compromised by early marriages, unsafe and unregulated working conditions, high rates of teen pregnancy, malnutrition, exposure to violence and lack of education opportunities.

    The report’s End of Childhood Index focuses on a set of life-changing events that signal the disruption of childhood. It ranks 172 countries based on where childhood is most intact and where it is most eroded. It shows which countries are succeeding, and failing, to provide conditions that nurture and protect their youngest citizens. The DR is ranked 120th out of a total of 172 countries included in the study.

    The numbers show there is a mortality rate among the under 5 years of age is 30.9 per 1,000 live births, 12.8 are involved in child labor and there are 97.3 births for each 1,000 girls between the ages of 15 and 19.

    In addition, the Dominican Republic is among the ten countries with the highest rate of child homicide with 118 deaths for each 100,000 children between the ages of 0 and 19.

    The report reveals that 7.1% of children have poor growth due to malnutrition and 14.6% do not go to school.

    In the same study, the USA is ranked the 36th best place to have a child. Highest ranked countries in Latin America and the Caribbean: are Chile (53rd), Bahamas (54), Cuba (61), Costa Rica (66), Argentina (67), St. Lucia (67), Trinidad & Tobago (71), Jamaica (73), Uruguay (74), Suriname (81), Brazil 89, Mexico (90), Ecuador (95), Belize 98), Panama (99), Paraguay (102), Peru (103), Nicaragua (109), Bolivia (14), Colombia (118), Haiti (121), Venezuela (q125), El Salvador (126), Honduras (142), Guatemala (147).

    https://www.diariolibre.com/noticias...ncia-KX7707408
    http://www.savethechildren.org/atf/c...ION_LOWRES.PDF

    The question is, is the DR a better place to raise children than one of the developed countries such as USA, UK, Canada, or Europe? Many of the ladies I deal with will always go back to their home countries to give birth to their half Dominican child and would prefer to raise them there.

    Matilda


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    I don't have kids but I would say it really depends on where in the DR and how much $$ you have to spend on education, care, etc. Where would I want my kids educated? Back home in Canada without a doubt, at least starting around mid-elementary.

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    We've weighed up the pros and cons throughout and opted for stability/continuity and stayed here in the DR.

    First of all, birth was in my home country because the health insurance provided by my employer at the time did not cover pregnancy and childbirth costs and because I would have the support of my parents and sister. My dad is a paediatrician and a specialist in child development and neonatal care. Cons - my husband was not with me for the birth because I went into labour early, but he was able to change his flight and arrived on day two. His family did not meet the baby right away, but two of his sisters and one brother-in-law visited us when the baby was six weeks old.

    We returned to the DR when our son was about three months old, and it was mostly OK. I was receiving very good support from MIL and SILs and older cousins. It was not so easy being away from my immediate family, friends, country, and adjusting to being a full time SAHM. However, being a parent of a baby in the DR is a mainly positive and enjoyable experience. People are supportive and engaging which is mostly good but sometimes it can cross some boundaries - e.g. being reprimanded because the baby is not wearing socks in 30-degree heat - by a stranger who was giving her own toddler Coca Cola. Slight struggles with family members with different ideas about what babies/toddlers/children should/shouldn't eat.

    The pre-school activities are good - in middle-class Santo Domingo anyway - we had a busy schedule of music classes, baby gym, etc. The main downside in the first few years was not having parks nearby - although we eventually moved to an apartment complex with gardens, pool and children's play area next to Parque Mirador Sur.

    Early education/childcare centres are good - again, private sector, but not as expensive as in my home country where pre-school childcare is not funded by the State.

    Schools are a mixed bag - we missed out on good free education in my home country and had to pay for not-so-good private education. Some parents we know have sent their children to relatives in their home country to complete high school but that was not an option for us. We seriously considered moving there as a family but decided that it was too risky economically. The main downside there - and it is a huge one - is that we will have to fund his university education.

    Moving to Punta Cana solved some of the issues about raising a child in Santo Domingo (safety, freedom, health, stress of school run) but we're aware that there is less cultural stimulation in our environment compared to what we would have in a big city. We try to make up for that when we travel overseas.

    Naturally this is completely from the perspective of someone who can afford private schooling and living in safe areas. The SC report reflects the harsh reality of childhood for the majority of Dominican children.

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    Education-wise the new government investment in the extended day schools and the increase in polytechnical schools is good news for the children and is making a difference. This is especially benefitting the middle class. Recently, at the beauty salon, several of the hair dressers explained of their efforts to get their children in the polytechnical schools. The hair dressers spoke of how important it was for them to have better quality education for free and the opportunities for the children to learn skills that could get them jobs.

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    The low score the DR gets is most probably weighed down by the high score in child marriages, 6th in the world. Only Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad and Guinea are higher.

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    My son was born in the US. Basically for insurance and comfort reasons. Had schooling both in the US and the DR. At times we questioned was it the right decision to have him schooled in the DR but I found socially it was very beneficial for him. There was never a lack of activities for him in the DR both socially and with family. But as Chiri stated this is coming from the advantage of being able to do this financially.

    We have family/friends who send their children to the US, etc...for education. But some of them grow up with a disconnect to their home country. This is something we did not want for our son. That being said if we were in a different financial situation instead of having my child go through the struggle, if the opportunity was there I would consider having him raised outside of the DR.

    You always want what is best for your children. Many times that means sacrificing some things for others. Education was never something we would consider sacrificing. I have nieces and nephews who are getting a very good education here in the DR. They are not financially well off by no means but the parents know how important a good education is for their future.

    I realize some are not so fortunate. And my case is not the reality for many that live in the DR. This is where I hope that the government continues to develop education programs for those with lesser means. These children are the future of the DR.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolores View Post
    The low score the DR gets is most probably weighed down by the high score in child marriages, 6th in the world. Only Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad and Guinea are higher.
    I didn't know this. I mean I was aware of age gaps etc. but not ranking 6th, wow.

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    I chose Canada as the place where my children would be born. I knew that in my situation, it would be more likely that I at least had the choice of a natural birth. In the DR, the chances would have been slim regardless of having had private insurance and access to excellent doctors.

    Private schools in the DR would be an option for us, but so far we feel that there will be more opportunities in Canada. Maybe that will change when our children reach school age, but for now that's what we've decided.

    Education is paramount and I hope availability and access in the DR continues to improve for those less fortunate. It will be a long, difficult road but I do think the path has been started.

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    This was never an issue for us, as our children were born and raised in the USA. I can, however, speak about our nieces and nephews. All were born with the same advantages, but the ones who ended up professionals were the ones with the parents who stressed education and had stable home lives with strong parental influence. Among them are attorneys, two engineers [one of whom was headhunted to the USA], MBAs... and then there is one who never works and "dances in the streets" and another who never seems to keep a job. The eldest works for the State of Pennsylvania in Philly, something to do with Medicaid I think. They all went to similar schools. The family life determined their success to a great degree.

    I was surprised to learn that even in the campo there are those who crack down on their kids, swaying them towards education and their future. One of our ex-maid's sons is finishing medical school, and she is raising her teenage granddaughter herself [the mother lives nearby, but maid doesn't consider her suitable]. She monitors what the girl does and wears, so that, in her words, she doesn't become a cuero.




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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolores View Post
    The low score the DR gets is most probably weighed down by the high score in child marriages, 6th in the world. Only Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad and Guinea are higher.


    By chance do you know the percentage of child marriages in the DR?  The Save the Children study gives Niger as the highest with 60% of girls aged 15-19 married, and Mali at 39% at number 5. Is the DR close to being that high?  I would have guessed more middle eastern and south Asian countries would round out the top ten but the DR must be really high.

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