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Thread: Dominican grammar and Spanish

  1. #11
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    Interesting Article by Professor John M Lipski, "Latin American Spanish: Creolization and the African Connection" :

    http://php.scripts.psu.edu/users/j/m/jml34/palara-1.pdf

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuillermoRamon View Post
    I find it the other way, at least in Sosua, they drop the S typically, i.e. words like Entonces become Entonce, and so on...Also, they seem to truncate words a lot, say the first 2/3 of it, good enough, not sure if that happens elsewhere? That makes it a bit hard for someone who is new to Spanish, I'm not fluent in Spanish, but the Spanish I learned is Castallano, and between the dropping of the S, truncating, speaking a 100 mph and HEAVY use of slang, makes it initially difficult to understand the Dominican Spanish.

    It's castellano not castallano.

    Castellano and español refer to the same language which is Spanish. If someone asks you - ¿hablas español? do you say no, hablo castellano. You will get a strange look.

    Historically as far back as the Middle Ages castellano referred to the region where Spanish originated which is Castilla in Spain and it was also used to differentiate it from other languages spoken in the country like Basque, Gallego etc. but as time evolved it became known as español and spoken in the entire country not just Castilla. It is also the language brought to Latin America via colonization known as español.

    However, the word castellano is still used especially in the older colonial cities (countries) in South America. In countries like Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Peru and even Venzuela the language is referred to as Castellano and strongly in the Southern Cone.


    -MP.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    It's castellano not castallano.

    Castellano and español refer to the same language which is Spanish. If someone asks you - ¿hablas español? do you say no, hablo castellano. You will get a strange look.


    -MP.
    I am aware that Castellano is Spanish, but that is to say that "Castellano" and that Spanish which is spoken in La R.D. do not "jive". 2 quick examples off the top of my head, a pen is boligrafo in Spain, not lápiz or pluma, zumo is juice in Spain, not jugo (and even how you are going to pronounce the Z is different, depending on region, vs the S sound in R.D.). I've yet to hear either of those words from Spain (And I've been to Spain) used in La R.D., hence me using the terminology, "I learned Castellano"...

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuillermoRamon View Post
    I am aware that Castellano is Spanish, but that is to say that "Castellano" and that Spanish which is spoken in La R.D. do not "jive". 2 quick examples off the top of my head, a pen is boligrafo in Spain, not lápiz or pluma, zumo is juice in Spain, not jugo (and even how you are going to pronounce the Z is different, depending on region, vs the S sound in R.D.). I've yet to hear either of those words from Spain (And I've been to Spain) used in La R.D., hence me using the terminology, "I learned Castellano"...
    Okay I understand your perspective now but if you are comparing Spain and DR vocabulary you will also hear lexical differences when you compare it to all the other Spanish-speaking countries too. You can imagine the list. 

    The two examples you gave vary as well. In some Latin American countries you will hear zumo and bolígrafo which is shortened to boli.

    What other Spanish-speaking countries have you visited? The variety is endless (not even including the regionalisms).


    -MP.

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    Always heard and used bolígrafo and/or lapicero (for pen) while growing up in the D.R.

    If we have switched to calling it pluma, we can attribute it to our monkey-see, monkey-do attitude.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    What other Spanish-speaking countries have you visited? The variety is endless (not even including the regionalisms).

    -MP.
    Cuba, R.D., Spain (Valencia, which does have it's own dialect), Panama.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucifer View Post
    Always heard and used bolígrafo and/or lapicero (for pen) while growing up in the D.R.

    If we have switched to calling it pluma, we can attribute it to our monkey-see, monkey-do attitude.

    I don't know if you can say it's even a switch because both words appear in the dictionary with no regional specification with the same meaning. In my experience the usage of both pluma and bolígrafo and now boli is quite balanced in the Spanish-speaking world. There are so many words that are said one way in Spain and different in Latin America but totally understood by speakers with exceptions. 


    Coche/ carro
    Patata/ papa
    Enfadarse/ enojarse
    Aparcar/ estacionar/ parquear
    Rueda/ llanta/ neumático/ goma

    These are just some random examples and the list goes on.


    -MP.

    Moderator Spanish Forum
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  11. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuillermoRamon View Post
    Cuba, R.D., Spain (Valencia, which does have it's own dialect), Panama.
    Leaving Spain out you have been to three countries with similar vocabulary and grammar patterns. I think the more exposure you have to Spanish the gap will narrow in what seems like Spain vs. Latin America or DR. It won't matter anymore or stand out as much.


    -MP.

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  13. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    I don't know if you can say it's even a switch because both words appear in the dictionary with no regional specification with the same meaning. In my experience the usage of both pluma and bolígrafo and now boli is quite balanced in the Spanish-speaking world. There are so many words that are said one way in Spain and different in Latin America but totally understood by speakers with exceptions. 


    Coche/ carro
    Patata/ papa
    Enfadarse/ enojarse
    Aparcar/ estacionar/ parquear
    Rueda/ llanta/ neumático/ goma

    These are just some random examples and the list goes on.


    -MP.
    Just adding to the list as the words come to mind:

    Gafas/ lentes 
    Conducir/ manejar
    Ordenador/ computadora 
    Vale/ bien (or many other local equivalent words)
    Carnet de conducir/ licencia de manejar


    I think the sense of Spain vs. Latin America narrows the more vocabulary one has. If a speaker does not understand just try another word. These in my opinion are quite standard. It's the fruits and vegetable vocabulary that could get tricky.


    -MP.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    There are so many words that are said one way in Spain and different in Latin America but totally understood by speakers with exceptions.  MP.


    And there are even differences in using words among Hispanic American countries. Una guagua is a bus (or a large cucaracha) as we know but in Chile it's a baby.

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