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Thread: Window and plywood question

  1. #11
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    Someone, sorry I forgot the name, posted a vid in the Hurricane thread that would work.

    I suggest: 5/8" to 3/4" exterior grade (called "Red Dot" here) plywood. Cut to fit the outside of the bars and use 2X4s on the inside and through bolt using large washers so the bars are in-between. Depending of the size of the area, you may need more then 1 2X4 and several bolts.

    This should be enough to stop most flying objects and really slow down the direct wind and wind driven rain hitting the glass directly. Unless you do the top and sides too, you will still get some rain and wind but not nearly as much as having a direct hit and doing the top/sides most likely not needed.

    Before taking down, I suggest that you mark the plywood so you know which window it covers just in case you need to put up again.

    I just took down my shutters a few days ago and thinking..... Do I have to put them back up again.... Sooo soon?
    Ordered more diesel for the generator. Dang!
    Last edited by DR Solar; 09-17-2017 at 07:13 AM.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubio_higuey View Post
    I am curios, would a plywood placed between the iron bars on the outside, and the window, protect the windows' crystal?
    Any chance you could post a picture of one of your windows so people will get an idea of what you are dealing with? Are they flat bars, curved bars, decorative type bars? How much space between the bars and window?

  4. #13
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    Several vids can be found via Google; window boarding. I didn't see any about security bars but the principles are the same. Some show they are using particle board or thin interior grade plywood that I would NOT recommend.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x1oP9JiTIZI

    I would have drilled the holes thru the plywood AND 2X4s at the same time so they match up.

  5. #14
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    just a thought; although plywood is conveniently quick to cut to shape, in the DR you cannot consider it more than a one-time fix because of termites. Also, since bars already would block various large projectiles, you do not really need to completely cover the windows. Depending on the situation, I would suggest you consider placing several planks across the bars; secure with u-bolts perhaps. For a typical 2' x 3' window in a block wall, two-foot 1x6 plank pieces with a one-inch or so gap between planks would be excellent protection and let in a little bit of light. Five such planks would do it and cost you one ten-foot board per window; much cheaper than plywood; at least as strong, and more likely to survive termite predation if you use criollo or pressure-treated wood. The bars are your friend; just supplement them a little.

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  7. #15
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    One reason that I stressed Exterior (Red Dot) plywood is that is somewhat insect and water resistant. The glues and pressure laminating is very different from interior and particle board that could delaminate during high winds and rain situations and correct, would not store very well IMHO.

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  9. #16
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    Originally composed last night but not posted then due to the database error:

    The plywood would need to be securely fastened in place somehow. If not the plywood bouncing around between the bars and the window in the wind might break the glass. Someone posted a video in one of these hurricane threads for Irma showing a way that does not require putting holes in the building to secure the plywood. (edit: others have since mentioned plywood held in place by 2x4s, bolts and washers - this is what I am referring to)

    If your bars are not curvy ornamental affairs, attaching the plywood to the outside of the bars should be straight forward and would probably prevent flying debris from reaching the glass and reduce the intensity of head on wind.

    Because there will be a gap between the wood and the window frame, sustained lateral winds could exert substantial pressure on the wood and thus the bars themselves. If the bars are not adequately secured to the building, strong enough winds pushing against the added surface area of the plywood in a direction away from building may be enough to rip the bars and the wood from the structure.

    Ideally, the plywood should be attached flush or almost flush with the wall. Maybe hang on to a set of bars and lift your feet of the ground. If the bars move at all, attaching plywood to them is not a good idea. Hard to know what to do. A lot would depend on wind speed, direction, duration and luck in determining if what you propose would be of more result in more of a benefit than potentially increasing the possibility of damage.

  10. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubio_higuey View Post
    Well, all pages talk about bolting the plywood with measurement of 7" wider/taller than the frame... obviously all those pages are targeted towards USA where they don't use metal bars.

    My question is specifically about fitting the plywood between the metal bars and window frames ... obviously the metal bars are not going (or should not) allow the plywood to fly off, even when not bolted ... so my question is, again whether that is feasible and better than just taping the windows.

    Never tape your windows!!! Highly dangerous old way of thinking to tape your windows in hurricane!!! And don't mount your plywood between bars and windows high wind vibration shatter you glass  mount plywood from outside use fence wire secure to bars..

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  12. #18
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    Problem is I live on the 2nd floor, but high, which would be 2nd and 1/2 floor, I just don't have access to a ladder tall enough.

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    Hire a contractor that has ladders and equipment?

    From the inside? Form wax coated heavy/thick cardboard against the bars and fill/stuff the space between with balled up newspaper forming a somewhat protective cushion against the cardboard and glass. ????? Might ?? be enough cushion to absorb small objects, wind and wind driven rain? And most likely leave shredded cardboard and paper all over the place? Less clean up?

    Out of ideas.

  14. #20
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    If that is the case, then the method of cutting the plywood to overlap the outside window frame and securing it with a strong bolt or two through a 2x4 across the inside of your window frame seems to be your best option that doesn't involve putting holes in the inside walls.

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