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Thread: Window and plywood question

  1. #21
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    OK guys, thank you everyone. Throughout my life I have worked much more with my brain than with my hands, so DIY is not my type of thing though I have done some pet projects in the past.

    Anyone could please explain to me in more detail, how to go about it (attaching plywood to the bars)? What are 2x4 and washers?

    Let's say I bring the plywood to the height of the bars, how would I attach that plywood that is outside, by doing it from inside?

  2. #22
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    Windows and glazed doors normally fail in hurricane conditions due to pull out due to the negative pressures exerted externally to structures and the main mode of failure is the fixings of frame to wall.

    Often the window unit remains intact as shown by the window units to Richard Bransons house in Neckar, BVI where his intact window units were found up to 40meters away from the buildings.

    The other mode of failure is the glass through impact or pull out of the frame which is far less likely.

    That is why you ply board over the opening with ply fixed to the wall to eliminate the negative pressure effect and also avoid impact damage.

    Much depends on the quality and size of your glazed. Small windows are surprisingly strong if they have been fixed properly with sufficient and correct length and quality fixings. Go check the number of fixings used. For smaller and even larger glazed units taping can be effective especially if the builder was so cheap and used single pane float glass which many do here in DR and is dangerous.

    If you have a 4mm plus 4mm laminate glass you will probably be good for most storms we get here without boarding, and if you have 6mm plus 6mm laminate it can survive even Irma as a local supplier confirmed this week about his supplied glazed units in a hotel in Anguilla.

    Being higher up, impact damage seems less likely but look what is around you. Fixing on the outside to the iron bars does not stop the pressure pull effect but does stop impact damage.

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cdn_Gringo View Post
    Ideally, the plywood should be attached flush or almost flush with the wall. Maybe hang on to a set of bars and lift your feet of the ground. If the bars move at all, attaching plywood to them is not a good idea. Hard to know what to do. A lot would depend on wind speed, direction, duration and luck in determining if what you propose would be of more result in more of a benefit than potentially increasing the possibility of damage.
    An ounce of prevention...

    When I purchased properties in FL, one of the first things I did was prep them for hurricanes. In good weather. Without panic.

    I took a different route. I would cut 1/2" plywood at least 8" beyond the windows and doors. I would mark the plywood and drill holes into the concrete block walls large enough to accomodate a strong SS lag bolt & lead shield. The hole would be slightly countersunk so the lag bolts and washer would be nearly flush with the surface. The bolt head and washer got painted the same color as the block. You could barely notice unless you got really close.

    I would then completely paint each plywood panel with epoxy paint, and each panel was maked for window, door and position. The reason being storing plywood in a humid environment will lead to delamination and warping. An epoxy barrier largely prevents that from happening. It also kept the plywood from becoming saturated in the storm rain.

    Each house took a couple of days to design and install.

    I had a storage unit just to store the plywood panels for all the houses, the cost spread over several units.

    When a storm came it took very little time to pull the panels out of storage and install them in the house. Everybody else was scampering around in a panic and dealing with supply shortages and high prices, with time slipping through the hourglass. Not me. In one day I could prep all six houses.

    When I sold the houses, a HUGE selling point was the storm preparation. The incease in price was way more than the cost of installation. AND the houses sold quickly. Purchasers stated that a prime motivator was the storm prep.

    I often thought about a business model based on a storm prep service using fiberglass panels instead of wood, kinda like a home alarm servive where a clent pays for installation, a monthly fee for storage, and a fee for storm installation. I'd contract with tradesmen for installation & removal.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ju10prd View Post
    Windows and glazed doors normally fail in hurricane conditions due to pull out due to the negative pressures exerted externally to structures and the main mode of failure is the fixings of frame to wall.

    Often the window unit remains intact as shown by the window units to Richard Bransons house in Neckar, BVI where his intact window units were found up to 40meters away from the buildings.

    The other mode of failure is the glass through impact or pull out of the frame which is far less likely.

    That is why you ply board over the opening with ply fixed to the wall to eliminate the negative pressure effect and also avoid impact damage.

    Much depends on the quality and size of your glazed. Small windows are surprisingly strong if they have been fixed properly with sufficient and correct length and quality fixings. Go check the number of fixings used. For smaller and even larger glazed units taping can be effective especially if the builder was so cheap and used single pane float glass which many do here in DR and is dangerous.

    If you have a 4mm plus 4mm laminate glass you will probably be good for most storms we get here without boarding, and if you have 6mm plus 6mm laminate it can survive even Irma as a local supplier confirmed this week about his supplied glazed units in a hotel in Anguilla.

    Being higher up, impact damage seems less likely but look what is around you. Fixing on the outside to the iron bars does not stop the pressure pull effect but does stop impact damage.
    You are correct: the negative pressure does more damage that flying objects. Once one opening is breached, a real mess will occur.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ju10prd View Post
    If you have a 4mm plus 4mm laminate glass you will probably be good for most storms we get here without boarding, and if you have 6mm plus 6mm laminate it can survive even Irma as a local supplier confirmed this week about his supplied glazed units in a hotel in Anguilla.
    I am renting and the building is quite old ... I have no way to find out what glass was used ... I guess whatever most people used when they were building 15+ years ago.

  7. #26
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    2x4 = a wooden board (not plywood) that is 2 inches thick by 4 inches wide.

    Washer = a metal disk with a hole in the middle that a bolt goes through to increase the holding strength of the bolt without biting into the plywood or the 2x4 weakening the holding power of the nut & bolt or making it difficult to later remove. You'll need a washer for the outside and inside for every nut and bolt you use. Slide the bolt through outside washer, then slide bolt through plywood and the 2x4 you are using to hold everything in place then slide on another washer than add and tighten the nut.

    31148822.jpg

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  9. #27
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    OK, found the video



    But where would I put the 2x4 piece of wood? Inside the house, or between the window and metal bars?
    Because
    1) if inside: windows would need to stay open (unless I would use two long bolts on the sides and leave windows open just a bit both on the right and left
    2) if between the bars and window: where exactly would I put this 2x4 piece of wood? It's not like it's going to stay in the middle, unless its somehow affixed to the middle horizontal rail of the metal bars ... but what would I use to affix it there?

  10. #28
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    OK, found the video



    But where would I put the 2x4 piece of wood? Inside the house, or between the window and metal bars?
    Because
    1) if inside: windows would need to stay open (unless I would use two long bolts on the sides and leave windows open just a bit both on the right and left
    2) if between the bars and window: where exactly would I put this 2x4 piece of wood? It's not like it's going to stay in the middle, unless its somehow affixed to the middle horizontal rail of the metal bars ... but what would I use to affix it there?

  11. #29
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    The 2x4 bracing goes across the inside of your window frame and extends 4 - 6 inches either side of the frame along the wall. Yes, unfortunately, you have to leave your windows open. As you say if you secure two bolts close to the frame you can partially close your windows. If it were possible and more feasible to use a single bolt in the centre of the window to hold everything you would not be able to close the window much if at all.

  12. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubio_higuey View Post
    I am renting and the building is quite old ... I have no way to find out what glass was used ... I guess whatever most people used when they were building 15+ years ago.
    Look at the size of the panes of glass first and surrounding area.

    If you have small panes it might not be needed to worry so much about glass pullout and impacts.

    My main focus would be on the number of fixings of frame to blockwork/concrete. I just checked the fixings of a 3metre by 1metre high unit I have in my rented place and we have two rusty pairs of fixings across the length of track which is hopeless.

    I doubt if fixing plywood of any thickness to bars offset from the windows will be any use. Look at the balcony doors first.

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