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Thread: Window and plywood question

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cdn_Gringo View Post
    Originally composed last night but not posted then due to the database error:

    The plywood would need to be securely fastened in place somehow. If not the plywood bouncing around between the bars and the window in the wind might break the glass. Someone posted a video in one of these hurricane threads for Irma showing a way that does not require putting holes in the building to secure the plywood. (edit: others have since mentioned plywood held in place by 2x4s, bolts and washers - this is what I am referring to)

    If your bars are not curvy ornamental affairs, attaching the plywood to the outside of the bars should be straight forward and would probably prevent flying debris from reaching the glass and reduce the intensity of head on wind.

    Because there will be a gap between the wood and the window frame, sustained lateral winds could exert substantial pressure on the wood and thus the bars themselves. If the bars are not adequately secured to the building, strong enough winds pushing against the added surface area of the plywood in a direction away from building may be enough to rip the bars and the wood from the structure.

    Ideally, the plywood should be attached flush or almost flush with the wall. Maybe hang on to a set of bars and lift your feet of the ground. If the bars move at all, attaching plywood to them is not a good idea. Hard to know what to do. A lot would depend on wind speed, direction, duration and luck in determining if what you propose would be of more result in more of a benefit than potentially increasing the possibility of damage.
    I sure would not attach the plywood to the bars, you simply create an airfoil and when hurricane strength winds get under it......

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by IslandDreaming View Post
    I sure would not attach the plywood to the bars, you simply create an airfoil and when hurricane strength winds get under it......
    In this Lowes video they use pressure clips to put in plywood from outside into window frame using 1/4 of inch of space. What would be the difference between this and attaching plywood to the bars? The potential airfoil exists in both cases....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jCUrYY3lEk

  3. #43
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    I am wondering if this setup would withstand a category 3 ..?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fPupQk81Ek

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubio_higuey View Post
    In this Lowes video they use pressure clips to put in plywood from outside into window frame using 1/4 of inch of space. What would be the difference between this and attaching plywood to the bars? The potential airfoil exists in both cases....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jCUrYY3lEk
    A friend of mine just used these in Florida. The difference is the plywood goes in flush with the window frame so no air can get behind the plywood panels. It sounds like your bars extend out past the surface of the wall, so you have a gap between your window and bars, right? Not the greatest installation if the plywood is mounted on the bars, but better than nothing. If your bars are well mounted in the wall, I think the chances of the plywood and bars being ripped off is slim.

    Here's the clips he bought: http://plylox.com/wp/ These are made for 1/2" plywood which is what he used. Not sure if other sizes are available(?).

  5. #45
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    Those tension clips look like an interesting and easy way to protect recessed windows.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cdn_Gringo View Post
    Those tension clips look like an interesting and easy way to protect recessed windows.
    Definitely. My friend said installation couldn't have been easier with those clips. Once the plywood is cut to fit your window casings, the job is basically done.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by rubio_higuey View Post
    In this Lowes video they use pressure clips to put in plywood from outside into window frame using 1/4 of inch of space. What would be the difference between this and attaching plywood to the bars? The potential airfoil exists in both cases....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jCUrYY3lEk
    If you place plywood anyplace but on house there is potential for wind to get behind it and create a large amount of lifting force

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by IslandDreaming View Post
    If you place plywood anyplace but on house there is potential for wind to get behind it and create a large amount of lifting force
    With the clips, the plywood goes all the way into the window casing flush up against the window frame. There's no way for wind to get behind the plywood.

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