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Thread: Who is Robin Berstein, the appointed US ambassador to DR

  1. #11
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    Whats the big deal over her appointment? No different than Brewster a political appointee. God you would think from comments that this was something new.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.fba914f6cc68

    A president picking someone with little or no foreign or diplomatic experience to be an ambassador is not unusual, though. In fact, it’s a largely accepted norm in the United States — although few other countries follow suit.


    Over the past few decades, about 30 percent of all ambassadors have been “political” nominees, according to information from the American Foreign Service Association. The other 70 percent were career diplomats who worked their way up through the Foreign Service.

    Although many political appointees may be chosen because of their suitability for the job, there is also a questionable but long-standing tradition of awarding ambassadorships to campaign donors or bundlers, too. President Richard M. Nixon can be heard telling his White House chief of staff, in a 1971 recording released decades later as part of the “Nixon Tapes,” that “anybody who wants to be an ambassador must at least give $250,000.”

    Sometimes these appointees do not necessarily seem qualified for the job. When President Obama nominated hotel magnate and campaign bundler George Tsunis to become U.S. ambassador to Norway in 2014, Tsunis was publicly grilled about his knowledge, or lack thereof, of the nation by Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). His response, one Norwegian outlet said, was “faltering, incoherent.”


    Tsunis’s bid to become ambassador to Norway eventually failed, but most political nominees make it through. Many perform without incident during their few years in the job, but some do not. Cynthia Stroum, who served as the ambassador to Luxembourg between 2009 and 2011 after being a major Obama donor, was later accused by officials from the State Department’s Inspector General’s Office of bringing “major elements of Embassy Luxembourg to a state of dysfunction” with her confrontational management style, among other problems.

    Supporters of the system suggest that political appointees may have close ties to the president, gaining them stature with their hosts, or they may simply be particularly competent. Investment banker Felix Rohatyn was named ambassador to France by President Bill Clinton in 1997. By the time he left in 2000, he had an enviable reputation as an expert in French politics and was a valuable asset for Washington. “He probably knew as many people in Paris as he did in New York,” Henri Barkey, a former State Department official, later wrote for The Washington Post.

    What’s certainly true is that political appointees tend to be sent to the more comfortable postings — Western or Northern Europe, for example, or the Caribbean. Career diplomats, on the other hand, often end up in more obscure places. No political appointee has ever been nominated to a position in Central Asia, perhaps unsurprisingly

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bienamor View Post
    Whats the big deal over her appointment? No different than Brewster a political appointee. God you would think from comments that this was something new.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.fba914f6cc68

    A president picking someone with little or no foreign or diplomatic experience to be an ambassador is not unusual, though. In fact, it’s a largely accepted norm in the United States — although few other countries follow suit.


    Over the past few decades, about 30 percent of all ambassadors have been “political” nominees, according to information from the American Foreign Service Association. The other 70 percent were career diplomats who worked their way up through the Foreign Service.

    Although many political appointees may be chosen because of their suitability for the job, there is also a questionable but long-standing tradition of awarding ambassadorships to campaign donors or bundlers, too. President Richard M. Nixon can be heard telling his White House chief of staff, in a 1971 recording released decades later as part of the “Nixon Tapes,” that “anybody who wants to be an ambassador must at least give $250,000.”

    Sometimes these appointees do not necessarily seem qualified for the job. When President Obama nominated hotel magnate and campaign bundler George Tsunis to become U.S. ambassador to Norway in 2014, Tsunis was publicly grilled about his knowledge, or lack thereof, of the nation by Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). His response, one Norwegian outlet said, was “faltering, incoherent.”


    Tsunis’s bid to become ambassador to Norway eventually failed, but most political nominees make it through. Many perform without incident during their few years in the job, but some do not. Cynthia Stroum, who served as the ambassador to Luxembourg between 2009 and 2011 after being a major Obama donor, was later accused by officials from the State Department’s Inspector General’s Office of bringing “major elements of Embassy Luxembourg to a state of dysfunction” with her confrontational management style, among other problems.

    Supporters of the system suggest that political appointees may have close ties to the president, gaining them stature with their hosts, or they may simply be particularly competent. Investment banker Felix Rohatyn was named ambassador to France by President Bill Clinton in 1997. By the time he left in 2000, he had an enviable reputation as an expert in French politics and was a valuable asset for Washington. “He probably knew as many people in Paris as he did in New York,” Henri Barkey, a former State Department official, later wrote for The Washington Post.

    What’s certainly true is that political appointees tend to be sent to the more comfortable postings — Western or Northern Europe, for example, or the Caribbean. Career diplomats, on the other hand, often end up in more obscure places. No political appointee has ever been nominated to a position in Central Asia, perhaps unsurprisingly
    you are absolutely right, bienamor. what you have posted is absolute gospel. that is why i wondered why some guy here made a big issue about Obama picking Wally because of his fund raising help, as if it was out of the ordinary.

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by DR Solar View Post
    https://dominicantoday.com/dr/local/...blic-wpbf-com/

    Florida woman to be envoy to Dominican Republic: wpbf.com

    Santo Domingo.-  US president Donald Trump on Wednesday said he will nominate Robin Bernstein to be ambassador to the Dominican Republic, wpbf.com reports.
    “Bernstein has served as President and Director of Richard S. Bernstein and Associates, Inc. since 2004, and Vice President and Director of Rizbur, Inc. since 2002, according to the White House press release,” the outlet reports, quoting a statement.
    The release, according to wpbf.com, adds that Bernstein is cofounder of Palm Beach Country Cares, a Florida relief effort for victims of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.


    I think that this is the same person that was announced back in Feb. but still has not been confirmed or maybe not even brought to a vote yet? I wonder how much time she would actually be living in the D.R. vs jetting back and forth to her home around Mar a Lago? I have not seen anything about her relief efforts and believe me, my wife and I pay a lot of attention to the efforts and situation in P.R.

    (guess I'll google now)
    I'm sure there's a select group of sankies that are already polishing their trade to see if they can make her stay in the country for the entirety of her appointmentship. It could create marital problems, but...

    Moderator Polls Forum

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  6. #14
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    Unlike nations such as the UK - which staff their Embassies from their trained Diplomatic Corps - the United States has always used private citizens and awarded the appointments as perks for support of presidential candidates... Often the size of the purse of the candidates is very important since there is very little $$ allotted to support the various diplomatic parties etc and in such important posts as London, Paris, Tokyo, - those posts - require people of substantial private means.

    It is absolutely a rule that the President gets to pick the Ambassadors - it is one of the political perks of the job that goes along with the post of President.

    Nothing unusual about this appointment
    nor the ones under Obama - which were, i thought, particularly irritating to the host nation... I thought Wally Brewster to be a very difficult choice - but given that the Holy See was sending pedophile Papal Nuncios - I suppose it was tit for tat.

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  8. #15
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    Reminder that all posts must be DR related, or they will be deleted.




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  9. #16
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    Wally did much good for the DR.   He convinced many US companies or organizations to invest or donate large sums of money for the country.

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  11. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hector L View Post
    Wally did much good for the DR.   He convinced many US companies or organizations to invest or donate large sums of money for the country.
    His appointment to the Dominican Republic under the Obama administration was a disgrace and an insult to the people here.

    He did NOTHING positive whilst here.

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  13. #18
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    More on Robin Bernstein...

    The White House statement says she speaks "basic Spanish". A US ambassador not speaking Spanish would not be a first for the DR. As stated, her predecessor was not fluent in Spanish.

    Moving up from basic Spanish for someone who has lived in Florida and is fluent in French should not be difficult. What is impressive is that she is fluent in Russian, according to a recent story in the Miami New Times.

    http://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/tr...panish-9797614

  14. #19
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    She has a bit of an education.... by the resume.

    If you can master a few languages - another one shouldn't be difficult
    As you have said, Dolores.....

  15. #20
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    The only time the US cared anything about the DR was when Trujillo was in charge. Google his White House trips and see for yourself.

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