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Thread: Wanna take a cruise? Visitor's Visas issued to Dominicans by USA and EU -

  1. #1
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    Default Wanna take a cruise? Visitor's Visas issued to Dominicans by USA and EU -

    The population of the DR in 2016 is estimated at 10.65 million. DR citizens have what is considered the weakest passport in Latin America.

    Here is information from the US government on visas issued to Dominican citizens.

    https://travel.state.gov/content/tra...tatistics.html

    Dominican Republic nonimmigrant visas by year issued to Dominican citizens over the past 10 years:

    2008 60,000
    2009 60,000
    2010 60,000
    2011 60,000
    2012 52,000
    2013 52,000
    2014 55,000
    2015 86,000
    2016 138,000
    2017 65,000

    Total over past 10 years is about 633,000 for all classes of non-immigrant visas issued to DR citizens by the USA. Let's assume for arguments sake that all of these visas were issued with a 10 year period, which is the maximum possible time for the B1/B2 visa. Of course this is not the case, but let's use that for now.

    With 10.65 million people and 633,000 US non-immigrant visas issues, that means a maximum of 6% of Dominican citizens have a valid US non-immigrant visa if we make the assumption that all of those visas were issued for the maximum period of 10 years and with multiple re-entries possible.

    Schengen visas normally more restrictive. In 2016 there were about


    DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 2016 Schengen visas applied for was 31,367 Total approved including Multiple Entry visas was 23,405

    Now with 10.65 million people and 23,405 having a Schengen visa that is 0.22 percent of Dominicans. Lets say these visas are valid for 5 years so that 1.1% of Dominican citizens have a valid Schengen visa, which is unlikely since most Schengen visas are for one year.

    https://www.schengenvisainfo.com/sch...-country-2016/

    So how many Dominicans have both a valid Schengen Visa and US Visitor's visa simultaneously that would allow them to take a cruise from the DR to EU and USA islands? Certainly less than 1 percent and probably far less than 1%.
    Last edited by windeguy; 12-13-2017 at 11:36 AM.

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    I've had US, Canadian and Schengen at the same time. By the way, a regular Schengen tourist visa is valid for three months, but once you've had one, it's easier to get another one in the future.
    What seems to be tougher right now: UK visas.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aguaita29 View Post
    I've had US, Canadian and Schengen at the same time. By the way, a regular Schengen tourist visa is valid for three months, but once you've had one, it's easier to get another one in the future.
    What seems to be tougher right now: UK visas.
    It must be good to be a 1 per center. I suspect you are a 0.1 per center with US, Canadian and Schengen at the same time. I was surprised to see how few Schengen visas are issued in the DR each year. Not as much interest in them as I expected. I suppose the bad times in Spain are a factor.

    I suspect US Visas are going to be harder in the future. Time will tell if that applies to non-immigrant visas as well as immigrant visas.

    Trump has vowed to end the visa lottery (does not apply to the DR) and end "chain immigration" which is a huge factor for getting entire Dominican families into the US.

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    An interesting presentation indeed, but it does not tell the whole story. The numbers revealed fail to focus on those Dominican citizens that currently live abroad, some for generations, as well as those Dominican citizens that may hold dual citizenship with another nation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caonabo View Post
    An interesting presentation indeed, but it does not tell the whole story. The numbers revealed fail to focus on those Dominican citizens that currently live abroad, some for generations, as well as those Dominican citizens that may hold dual citizenship with another nation.
    My discussions in this and other thread on cruises absolutely did not concern themselves with DR citizens who already live elsewhere and have residency or citizenship in other countries. That story is irrelevant to the point that I am making regarding DR citizens with both US and Schengen visitor's visas, is it not?

    How many of them are going to Amber Cove to take a cruise? That is where the focus is. I have proven to you that it is a very small per centage of Dominicans that can take advantage of Cruises from Amber Cove or any other DR based starting point for a cruise that includes US and EU controlled destinations.
    Last edited by windeguy; 12-13-2017 at 01:59 PM.

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    To clarify some points made within another thread:
    A. You asked, "Could a Dominican citizen actually take one of these cruises?". I, as well as two other posters, responded yes, and stated how it is possible.
    B. Matilda made a statement, "Not unless it only goes to the DR or Haiti." This statement standing alone is incorrect.
    C. You went on to declare, "almost no Dominican citizens will be able to board a cruise in the DR". Again, this is an incorrect statement.
    D. You then concluded your declaration with a reference to US Visas and Schengen Visas, "The odds of having both for a DR citizen is close to zero." I am in agreement with this statement, as one person holding both types of these Visas at the same time, may be a very low percentage as a whole.
    I believe thoughtful conversations can be had, minus the broad generalizations.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caonabo View Post
    To clarify some points made within another thread:
    A. You asked, "Could a Dominican citizen actually take one of these cruises?". I, as well as two other posters, responded yes, and stated how it is possible.


    Of course a very small number of Dominican citizens could take this cruise. I should have been more clear in my question and requested the percentages that would be allowed to take such a cruise. I will try to be more exact in the future. Sorry for the confusion.
    B. Matilda made a statement, "Not unless it only goes to the DR or Haiti." This statement standing alone is incorrect.

    Agreed that she an I were making a broad generalization about the vast majority of Dominicans that would not be allowed to board a cruise. As I mentioned, I will try to be more careful about my intent in the future.
    C. You went on to declare, "almost no Dominican citizens will be able to board a cruise in the DR". Again, this is an incorrect statement.
    Here we disagree. To me, a percentage of less than 1% (probably far less than 1%) is "almost no Dominicans", and is not the same for you.

    D. You then concluded your declaration with a reference to US Visas and Schengen Visas, "The odds of having both for a DR citizen is close to zero." I am in agreement with this statement, as one person holding both types of these Visas at the same time, may be a very low percentage as a whole.
    I believe thoughtful conversations can be had, minus the broad generalizations.
    We do agree that holding both a Schengen visa and a US visa simultaneously is done by a very small number of Dominicans. And that is the reason for my restating that almost no Dominican citizens will be able to board a cruise at Amber Cove (or any other departure point) that goes to US and EU territories.

    That said, did other people get what I meant by the broad generalization I erroneously used previously?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caonabo View Post
    An interesting presentation indeed, but it does not tell the whole story. The numbers revealed fail to focus on those Dominican citizens that currently live abroad, some for generations, as well as those Dominican citizens that may hold dual citizenship with another nation.

    Good point.

    It would be interesting to see how many US citizens and Spanish citizens live in the country. Its safe to assume that most people in the DR with those citizenship are probably Dominicans to start with.

    Many upper class and even upper middle class women go to the USA on their last month or two of their pregnancy in order for the kid to be born with US citizenship. Then head back to the DR to continue on with life. If the kid in adulthood decides he wants to leave the DR for anything, all he has to do is buy a one way plane ticket and he’s out. Also leaves the touristic door open for a large number of countries.

    Then there are Dominicans with dual citizenship that declare their DR born kids at the US embassy, securing US citizenship for them too.

    Then are Dominican emigrants that naturalized as US citizens while living in US and then return to DR.

    Lastly as the Dominicans (by origin) born and raised in the US and later decide to live in DR.

    Moderator Polls Forum

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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    Good point.

    It would be interesting to see how many US citizens and Spanish citizens live in the country. Its safe to assume that most people in the DR with those citizenship are probably Dominicans to start with.  
    I actually know one of those people. But they have zero to do with my real point, which I have hopefully clarified.

    My point is about people with Dominican passports only who have both Schengen and USA visas simultaneously.

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    Quote Originally Posted by windeguy View Post
    ..............That story is irrelevant to the point that I am making regarding DR citizens with both US and Schengen visitor's visas, is it not?

    How many of them are going to Amber Cove to take a cruise? That is where the focus is. I have proven to you that it is a very small per centage of Dominicans that can take advantage of Cruises from Amber Cove or any other DR based starting point for a cruise that includes US and EU controlled destinations.
    Maybe, just maybe the cruise ship people aren't counting on Dominicans only. Take a look at the cruise ships that leave from Florida. I am most certain the vast majority of the passengers who board the cruise ships in Florida do not reside there. Could it possibly be the cruise lines are thinking more in terms of people flying into POP and start their cruise at Amber Cove?

    As far as Dominicans with the required Visas i have no clue but trust there are quite a few who have the cash. You won't find them on the north coast.......

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