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Thread: can someone explain the differences

  1. #1
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    Default can someone explain the differences

    ok here goes..... having alot of trouble figuring out when and how to use the following:mio/mios,mia/mias,tuyo/tuya,tuyos/tuyas,su/sus,suya/suyo,suyas/suyos,el mio/el mia, etc you get my drift of difficulty in understanding the usage and meaning of these.Can someone please use them in a sentence and translate the English equivalent.Thanks so much think I'm gonna have a brain hemorrage ugh!

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    I'll have a bash: feel free to correct or add information.

    mio - mine, refering to an object that is masc. sing. Ese libro es mio.

    mios - mine, refering to an object that is masc. pl. Esos libros son mios.

    mia - mine, refering to an object that is fem. sing. Esa flor es mia.

    mias - mine, refering to an object that is fem. pl. Esas flores son mias.

    tuyo - yours, refering to an object that is masc. sing. Ese niño es tuyo.

    tuya - yours, refering to an object that is fem. sing. Esa niña es tuya.

    tuyos - yours, refering to an object that is masc. pl. Esos niños son tuyos.

    tuyas - yours, refering to an object that is fem. pl. Esas niñas son tuyas.

    su - his/her (or yours if using usted) refering to an object that is masc. sing.

    Juan es su hijo.

    sus - his/her (or yours if using usted) refering to an object that is masc. pl

    Juan y Pedro son sus hijos.

    suya - his/hers (or yours if using usted) refering to an object that is fem. sing.

    Esa mochila es suya.

    suyo - his/hers (or yours if using usted) refering to an object that is masc. sing.

    Ese libro es suyo.

    suyas - his/hers (or yours if using usted) refering to an object that is fem. pl.

    Esas niñas son suyas.

    suyos - his/hers (or yours if using usted) refering to an object that is masc. pl.

    Esos niños son suyos.

    el mio/el mia - same as mio/mia but with emphasis.

    That one is mine! ¡Aquel es el mio!/¡Aquella es la mia!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by canajungirl
    ok here goes..... having alot of trouble figuring out when and how to use the following:mio/mios,mia/mias,tuyo/tuya,tuyos/tuyas,su/sus,suya/suyo,suyas/suyos,el mio/el mia, etc you get my drift of difficulty in understanding the usage and meaning of these.Can someone please use them in a sentence and translate the English equivalent.Thanks so much think I'm gonna have a brain hemorrage ugh!
    Just remember the mio vs. mios or tuya vs. tuyas refers to the single or plural for the item in question not the person - so mio is it (one thing) is mine, while mios is (more than one thing) are mine. Tuya for tu, suyo/a for el/ella, etc.

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    that clears it up! so in the case of el mio/mia "el" does not represent "him" the mio/mia refers to the object's masc/fem property?If that is correct ,I have another one just thought of - nuestro/a and vuestro/a what is the meaning and usage please.Chiri thanks for the time in answering and clearing things up!

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    As my bi-lingual 4 year-old son says: 'That one's the mine!' - literal translation of 'ese es el mio' The 'el' as you say agrees with the gender of the object it's referring to.

    Esa pelota es la mia. Ese juguete es el mio.

    Nuestro and vuestro - unless you're going to Spain forget vuestro. It is your/yours, the second person familiar plural (plural of tu) which is hardly ever used in Latin American Spanish.

    Nuestro is our/ours:

    Our:
    Nuestro hijo tiene 4 años. Nuestra casa es grande. Nuestros vecinos son simpaticos. Nuestras tias cocinan bien.

    Ours:
    Ese caballo es nuestro. Esa gallina es nuestra. Esos patos son nuestros. Esas vacas son nuestras.
    Last edited by Chirimoya; 05-05-2005 at 01:40 PM. Reason: added relevant bits

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    Very good lesson, Chirimoya!

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    Quote Originally Posted by juancarlos
    Very good lesson, Chirimoya!
    - thanks juancarlos- your post brought me back to the thread and I noticed I'd left something out.

  8. #8
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    Default Part II

    These forms are called the long form of the possessive adjective. The examples given already represent one form of usage however, these forms can also follow the noun.

    For example:

    "A friend (male) of mine"= Un amigo mío. As opposed to mi amigo.


    If anyone wishes to expand please feel free.... no tengo tiempo.


    LDG.

  9. #9
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    I am a little confused.

    If you are saying "that book is mine" it would be "ese libro es el mio" and if it is "that thing is mine" would be "esa cosa es la mia" and "those things are mine" would be "esas cosas son las mia"

    BUT "those books are mine" is "esos libros son los mios" and "eses libros son los mios" is not correct?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_NJ
    I am a little confused.

    If you are saying "that book is mine" it would be "ese libro es el mio" and if it is "that thing is mine" would be "esa cosa es la mia" and "those things are mine" would be "esas cosas son las mia"
    That book is mine - ese libro es mio OR "ese libro es el mio". When you say the latter you are adding emphasis. Literally "that is the one that is my book".

    That thing(f) is mine and those things(f) are mine - same applies. The latter
    should be "esas cosas son las mias".

    BUT "those books are mine" is "esos libros son los mios" and "eses libros son los mios" is not correct?
    Those books are mine: "Esos libros son los mios". No such thing as "Eses".

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