Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Moreno/a in English

  1. #1
    Mr.Mark
    Guest

    Default Moreno/a in English

    This is for those of you that have come to distinguish the difference between a morena from Spain -or Argentina- and a morena from the DR. I've read that it's not correct to translate morena as "brunette", since morenas are not considered white when brunettes are.

    I have a friend, and she looks like Pocahontas. Her skin colour is like that of Pocahontas -you know, a Disney character-. She's not black, she has long straight hair, you could say her skin colour is like that of people from Morocco -caramel coloured skin- and she has soft facial features. To be more specific, she's a morena clara. We also have trigueñas... I'm confused.

    Can someone help me with this nomenclature?

  2. #2
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    630
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Mark
    This is for those of you that have come to distinguish the difference between a morena from Spain -or Argentina- and a morena from the DR. I've read that it's not correct to translate morena as "brunette", since morenas are not considered white when brunettes are.

    I have a friend, and she looks like Pocahontas. Her skin colour is like that of Pocahontas -you know, a Disney character-. She's not black, she has long straight hair, you could say her skin colour is like that of people from Morocco -caramel coloured skin- and she has soft facial features. To be more specific, she's a morena clara. We also have trigueñas... I'm confused.

    Can someone help me with this nomenclature?

    Dominicans in the US call Black Americans "morenos". Your friend in the DR, would be "india" colored. Remember, in the US she would be considered "Black" no matter what. Perhaps the word in English for Moreno is Brown.

  3. #3
    Mr.Mark
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stodgord
    Dominicans in the US call Black Americans "morenos". Your friend in the DR, would be "india" colored. Remember, in the US she would be considered "Black" no matter what. Perhaps the word in English for Moreno is Brown.
    I don't think she would be considered black, I think you'll have to see her -she's such a cutie!-. I'm Dominican, I know what I'm saying when I say she's morena or india, my problem comes when trying to translate that into English.

    Thanks, man.

  4. #4
    Bronze
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,477
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Tanned or Caramel. And just for the record, Moroccans are like Dominicans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans, in the sense that their skin comes in all shades of color.

  5. #5
    Bronze
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,477
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Plus, you never said where your friend is from. That has some influence too.

  6. #6
    Silver
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,785
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Dark-haired

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Mark
    I don't think she would be considered black, I think you'll have to see her -she's such a cutie!-. I'm Dominican, I know what I'm saying when I say she's morena or india, my problem comes when trying to translate that into English.

    Thanks, man.
    The word morena is correctly used as dark-haired, if she is indian than she is indian, mullatoes in the US are considered black no matter how light they are or long their hair is. Where ever she is from is what her culture will refer to her as. They are tons of Pocohantas looking morenas in the US.

  7. #7
    Mr.Mark
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly32837
    Tanned or Caramel. And just for the record, Moroccans are like Dominicans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans, in the sense that their skin comes in all shades of color.
    Of course Moroccans have multiple skin color gradients, but I was refering to the most common sking color, which is like that of wheat or a bit like caramel -in that sense, I look more Moroccan than her since my skin color is more common in Morocco-. My friend is Dominican and going 4 generations back all her ancestors are Dominican too. Caramel would describe her skin color, but it's not useful to use as an epithet for all her body features. Her hair is black and straight and long.

    Gracias!

  8. #8
    Mr.Mark
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ricardo900
    The word morena is correctly used as dark-haired, if she is indian than she is indian, mullatoes in the US are considered black no matter how light they are or long their hair is. Where ever she is from is what her culture will refer to her as. They are tons of Pocohantas looking morenas in the US.
    She's not indigenous, she's from the DR and remember that aborigines disappeared from here. Morena in the Dominican Republic is not only for dark-haired people, in Spain it is, but not in the DR (if you see a white woman with black hair here she's not considered morena).

  9. #9
    Bronze
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,477
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Mark
    Of course Moroccans have multiple skin color gradients, but I was refering to the most common sking color, which is like that of wheat or a bit like caramel -in that sense, I look more Moroccan than her since my skin color is more common in Morocco-. My friend is Dominican and going 4 generations back all her ancestors are Dominican too. Caramel would describe her skin color, but it's not useful to use as an epithet for all her body features. Her hair is black and straight and long.

    Gracias!
    Then I would say that she is a caramel colored Dominican woman. I don't think that there is a word to say it in english. I guess you would just describe it. What is the point of this anyway?

  10. #10
    Mr.Mark
    Guest

    Default Como que "what is the point...?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly32837
    Then I would say that she is a caramel colored Dominican woman. I don't think that there is a word to say it in english. I guess you would just describe it. What is the point of this anyway?
    The point, obviously, is that I have some curiosity about something and I'm asking for help just like all people here do. Why do you ask me what's the point? A friend asked me how to describe this morena thing in English and I'm looking for some insight, that's all.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •