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Thread: Hurricanes

  1. #1
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    Smile Hurricanes

    I was informed by real estate agent in Sosua that there has NEVER been a confirmed hurricane that has made it to the north coast in history!
    If true, seems a no brainer to prefer the north coast. Anyone beg to differ?
    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Costa Azul View Post
    I was informed by real estate agent in Sosua that there has NEVER been a confirmed hurricane that has made it to the north coast in history!
    If true, seems a no brainer to prefer the north coast. Anyone beg to differ?
    Steve

    Come on Steve you know better than that or should. He's just throwing you the old sales pitch. In the last 100 or so years of hurricane records there have been quite a few around the north part of the country. Don't believe me go to the source.

    On link Query by "name place"--go to non-US locations--click "eastern carribbean"--click city--chose city--Submit--category all storms-- date "all years"--"all months"

    http://maps.csc.noaa.gov/hurricanes/viewer.html

  3. #3
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    Default You're kidding

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Costa Azul View Post
    I was informed by real estate agent in Sosua that there has NEVER been a confirmed hurricane that has made it to the north coast in history!
    If true, seems a no brainer to prefer the north coast. Anyone beg to differ?
    Steve

    1998 Hurricane Georges...? I was there. Roofs were blowing off and there was martial law. Many people died those few days. Are you trying to buy real estate? This agent also sells land off the northcoast. No hurricanes at the bottom of the ocean but there is land down there somewhere. *Sigh*

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    Yep we were here for Georges, too. Nowhere near as bad as the south got it, but enough to loosen a zinc sheet on roof (Bushbaby repaired at expense of his thumb wind strong enough for me to need to hold ladder). Hortense in '96 didn't get to PP, turned right at Samana, David in '79 effected north coast. I think it has been about 9 hurricanes impacting north coast in total. Also Jeanne in 2004 although TS level by the time it got to us. This is all off the top of my head so dates/names may be wrong, but DO check.

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    If you are going to buy a home near the ocean in southern US or the Caribbean, Sosua is, based on the record, as safe or safer than any place else. If you look at the chart that A. Hidalgo linked to, do a search for all storms in all years, you get a very impressive number. However, if you look at the lines depicting the storm tracks, you will see that most were in the ocean when they passed by Sosua and that the rest had crossed the country from the south before getting to Sosua.

    Additionally, if you look at all the data included with the long list of storms, you will see that most were tropical storms or tropical depressions and that wind speeds of 30-50 miles were common.

    Yes, there are hurricanes on the list, but what that webpage does not tell you is what the wind speed was when it passed by Sosua. For example, storms crossing the country have lost much of their punch by the time they get to Sosua.

    Sosua is not on the route normally taken by hurricanes. Most that leave the Caribbean have started to curve north before they get to Sosua. We may get winds of 35-45 miles, but these are not huricane force winds and are easily handled by the type of construction common here. Sure, if you have zinc sheets on your roof, or palm branches, you may have trouble. But I doubt very much that any house or apartment that you are looking at has such a roof.

  6. #6
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    Default I do agree

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken View Post
    If you are going to buy a home near the ocean in southern US or the Caribbean, Sosua is, based on the record, as safe or safer than any place else. If you look at the chart that A. Hidalgo linked to, do a search for all storms in all years, you get a very impressive number. However, if you look at the lines depicting the storm tracks, you will see that most were in the ocean when they passed by Sosua and that the rest had crossed the country from the south before getting to Sosua.

    Additionally, if you look at all the data included with the long list of storms, you will see that most were tropical storms or tropical depressions and that wind speeds of 30-50 miles were common.

    Yes, there are hurricanes on the list, but what that webpage does not tell you is what the wind speed was when it passed by Sosua. For example, storms crossing the country have lost much of their punch by the time they get to Sosua.

    Sosua is not on the route normally taken by hurricanes. Most that leave the Caribbean have started to curve north before they get to Sosua. We may get winds of 35-45 miles, but these are not huricane force winds and are easily handled by the type of construction common here. Sure, if you have zinc sheets on your roof, or palm branches, you may have trouble. But I doubt very much that any house or apartment that you are looking at has such a roof.


    Since most (but not all) hurricanes have a northerly to west northerly path hurricanes usually strike in the southern or southeastern section of Hispaniola. Hispaniola is a large island with large mountain ranges. These mountains do a good job at breaking up hurricanes. Hurricane Georges struck the southeastern section of the island and churned across. Quite a few people lost their lives in the Santo Domingo area and also some perished in Santiago (as well as other sections). I had the misfortune to witness people being washed away in a river in Santiago the day after the hurricane struck. The north coast was spared fairly well compared to the rest of the island. It was still scary enough to keep people inside strongly built homes. I wouldn't want to get hit with a flying sheet of metal roof careening at me at 50 mph.

    However, for a real estate agent to make such a ridiculous claim that a hurricane has never hit the north coast ought to be blown off the island.

  7. #7
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    See http://dr1.com/weather/hurricanes.shtml

    If you check the list of hurricanes affecting the DR and where they hit, in about 100 years there is only Jeanne (cat 1) to hit Puerto Plata. So, Puerto Plata is definitely a good place to be, probability-wise. But, remember the weather is changing (probably why Puerto Plata was affected last year).

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    I am more concerned about a big earthquake. At least with a hurricane, you know in advance that it is coming and can head inland. The 6.5 earthquake we had a couple years ago shocked me. I was in Santiago that night. I had never experienced an earthquake before.

    Larry

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    Default Ahhh don't we know that

    Quote Originally Posted by Larry View Post
    I am more concerned about a big earthquake. At least with a hurricane, you know in advance that it is coming and can head inland. The 6.5 earthquake we had a couple years ago shocked me. I was in Santiago that night. I had never experienced an earthquake before.

    Larry
    I was bouncing down the road in my jeepeta. I just passed Eddy' Sports Bar, it was a quiet Sunday night. Suddenly, it felt as if I hit a big bungee cord in the road. I sort of surged, then I heard smashing all around me. Everything was broken and nobody could clearly explain what just happened. I watched the road wave as if it was water and then I knew what it was, a 6.5 earthquake. I'm a NY guy and I never experienced anything like that.

    So, yes earthquakes are a major concern to me over hurricanes. We can perpare for a hurricane but cannot for a quake (yet).

  10. #10
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    Please note the North Coast is deemed to be:
    Puerto Plata, Luperon, Sosua, Cabarete, Playa Grande, Rio San Juan, Cabrera, Nagua. (Samana in not the north coast)

    I have been here for over 20 years and have never seen anything other than tropical storm winds in Sosua area and eastwards to Rio San Juan. A few trees broken, some tin on roofs, some heavy rain, some flooding....tropical storms.

    Yes they have been badly hit on other coasts but the north has stayed, so far, relatively safe.
    There was no Martial Law on the north Coast.

    Hurricane Georges....I was here and thought I was in for my first hurricane but on the north it was no more than a heavy rain and wind and some broken trees.

    WE have watched over the years with amazment as US TV stations have said things like the DR has been totally damaged by certain hurricanes when on the North side we have had sunshine with a few hours rain and wind gusts.
    Santo Domingo also is not the north coast...its a world away with those high mountains between us.

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