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Thread: Recession of 2008 and impact on the DR

  1. #4871
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    Quote Originally Posted by PICHARDO View Post
    There are enough other choices for a Dominican to migrate based on economics as you stated. Much easier and less burdensome then the US Visa process, like Israel, Japan, etc...

    The migration to the US is based on an already established strong link with extended family already settled there.

    Same for Spain and other countries the DR citizens migrate to on a regular basis.

    Dominicans for the most part (low middle class and below) are willing to clean toilets elsewhere the pay dignifies the worker, but not in the DR, where employers want to still pay 1980's wages or at Haitian discounted payrolls.
    I seen comments here by some foreigners that will portrait Dominicans as greedy, malcontent, lazy etc IN THEIR OWN COUNTRY for refusing to work for peanuts but regard Haitians national as the second coming HARD WORKING,always with a smile, etc. These foreigners do not feel any remorse of taking advantage of these people but are scratching their head a they see Quiskeya with all these malcontents and lazy how they created a paradise and Haiti did not?

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    Tourism Growth
    Dominican Republic announced a 3.9 percent increase in 2017 for overall tourism to the country. This surpasses the 1.7 percent growth for the Caribbean, which received a total of 30.1 million visitors in 2017. Dominican Republic accounted for 21 percent of all Caribbean travel with 6,187,542 million tourists. The United States remains the largest source market for Dominican tourism with 2,073,963 million visitors in 2017, and Canada following with 837,000.

    The first quarter of 2018 has reported stronger than ever numbers with a 7.7 percent growth in Q1 – one of the highest year-over-year growths on record.

    Hotels
    Dominican Republic’s hotel occupancy rate for 2017 was an impressive 77 percent. The properties with the highest occupancy rates were: Punta Cana – Bávaro (82.8%), Romana – Bayahibe (82%), and Chica – Juan Dolio (71.4%). The destinations with the highest occupancy rates were: Samaná (67.6%), Santo Domingo (62.4%), and Santiago (56.9%).

    Thi is in large part to the new hotel rooms that became available in 2017, bringing the existing number of rooms to 77,259. The growth does not stop there. Dominican Republic will add 15,000 new rooms and update 6,000 existing rooms in 2018.

    Air Arrivals
    Punta Cana International Airport (PUJ) continues to be the main point of entry into Dominican Republic with 3,643,488 international tourists received in 2017. This is followed by Santo Domingo’s Las Americas Airport (SDQ) with 1,348,014; Santiago’s Cibao International Airport (STI) with 548,081 and Puerto Plata’s Gregorio Luperón International Airport (POP) following closely with 472,705. Dominican Republic currently has an open-sky policy, allowing for a large influx of flights.

    Cruise Arrivals
    Arrivals to the DR by cruise ships increased by 37 percent in 2017 compared to 2016, representing over 1.2 million visitors – exceeding the estimate by 200,000. The reconstruction of Puerto Plata’s cruise port was announced in December by President Danilo Medina, which is now open. Since Amber Cove’s inauguration, an average of 5,000 cruise visitors arrive weekly to the area.

    Diversification of Offerings
    Numbers show that tourists are continuing to look for vacations beyond the beach and are showing greater interest in multi-destination travel – 80 percent of all visits to Dominican Republic’s protected areas are by foreigners, proving that visitors are increasingly looking to explore beyond their hotel. In 2017, Saona Island welcomed 700,000 visitors as part of day-trips from resorts in Punta Cana, while the Colonial City saw an increase in 500,000 visitors.
    One Dominican at a time please!


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  4. #4873
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    Dominican Republic leapfrogs to energy-efficient lighting

    The Dominican Republic has called for a ban on imports of fluorescent lamp and urged state institutions in the Caribbean nation to switch to more efficient light-emitting diodes, better known as LEDs.

    “We aim to become the first all-LED island in the world, for the benefits it provides to our citizens and the environment,” Minister for the Environment and Natural Resources Francisco Domínguez Brito said. “By leapfrogging to LED lighting, the Dominican Republic will not only reduce electricity consumption but also eliminate the use of mercury in lighting products.”
    One Dominican at a time please!


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  6. #4874
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    Quote Originally Posted by PICHARDO View Post
    Dominican Republic leapfrogs to energy-efficient lighting

    The Dominican Republic has called for a ban on imports of fluorescent lamp and urged state institutions in the Caribbean nation to switch to more efficient light-emitting diodes, better known as LEDs.

    “We aim to become the first all-LED island in the world, for the benefits it provides to our citizens and the environment,” Minister for the Environment and Natural Resources Francisco Domínguez Brito said. “By leapfrogging to LED lighting, the Dominican Republic will not only reduce electricity consumption but also eliminate the use of mercury in lighting products.”
    Just last month I ordered 16 LED bulbs on Ebay. Way cheaper than buying them here.

  7. #4875
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    Quote Originally Posted by PICHARDO View Post
    Dominican Republic leapfrogs to energy-efficient lighting

    The Dominican Republic has called for a ban on imports of fluorescent lamp and urged state institutions in the Caribbean nation to switch to more efficient light-emitting diodes, better known as LEDs.

    “We aim to become the first all-LED island in the world, for the benefits it provides to our citizens and the environment,” Minister for the Environment and Natural Resources Francisco Domínguez Brito said. “By leapfrogging to LED lighting, the Dominican Republic will not only reduce electricity consumption but also eliminate the use of mercury in lighting products.”
    Could anyone see the obvious elephant in the room, this has to be the biggest oxymoron of all times. Be energy efficient in a country where the biggest problem is having energy?

    Are these the types of "first" announcements that make this poster great?

    Laughable indeed.

  8. #4876
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonD View Post
    Could anyone see the obvious elephant in the room, this has to be the biggest oxymoron of all times. Be energy efficient in a country where the biggest problem is having energy?

    Are these the types of "first" announcements that make this poster great?

    Laughable indeed.


    And the other obvious elephant in the room.......limited energy sources...........powered by the new coal fired power plant.....but hey.....led lighting...it’s good for the environment......

    Respectfully,
    Playacaribe2 

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  10. #4877
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    Default Having it both ways Playa?

    Quote Originally Posted by playacaribe2 View Post
    And the other obvious elephant in the room.......limited energy sources...........powered by the new coal fired power plant.....but hey.....led lighting...it’s good for the environment......

    Respectfully,
    Playacaribe2 
     At least the DR as a small country are trying to do something, they obviously would have been better off with an alternative to coal pollution.
    What is your excuse for US policy and an increase of coal production, and the denial of pollution charges.

    Under Obama mining companies were ordered to  pay higher royalties to the government.
    The new US administration should be deeply embarrassed.

    Wouldn't it be great if the US would have helped the poor DR to set up a Natural Gas power plant, with a gas turbine, to reduce operating costs and pollution?
    Oh, I forgot pollution and climate change are just fake news!

  11. #4878
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobo Tropical View Post
     At least the DR as a small country are trying to do something, they obviously would have been better off with an alternative to coal pollution.
    What is your excuse for US policy and an increase of coal production, and the denial of pollution charges.

    Under Obama mining companies were ordered to  pay higher royalties to the government.
    The new US administration should be deeply embarrassed.

    Wouldn't it be great if the US would have helped the poor DR to set up a Natural Gas power plant, with a gas turbine, to reduce operating costs and pollution?
    Oh, I forgot pollution and climate change are just fake news!
    Why would the US need to help. Company I used to work for worked with both SeaBoard on the Ozama here in Santo Domingo and AES Dominicana to convert to Natural Gas. The know how is here in the DR.

  12. #4879
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    Quote Originally Posted by PICHARDO View Post
    Perspective based on factual figures! That's what its about!

    The DR with a population of just over 10 million (a good chunk of Haitians btw). Considered here by a many to be a wasteland and overall poor, has a disproportionate percentage of U.S. Visas issued (both on non-immigrant and immigrants) relative to the percentage of its population compared to the rest of the countries and their populations issued visas as well.

    If we can all agree (which is not hard to see, even here for die hard B.S. based debaters) that the vetting requirements for a U.S. Visa are economically sound when it comes to related metrics for individuals, then we can see how this relates to the overall DR citizen/family enjoying a much better economic situation unlike others here paint. Numbers don't lie, and the way the U.S. consulate goes about verifying financial documentation for applicants, it leaves little room for fraud or manipulation of support financials.

    Try and do some calculations and see the % the DR represents compared to other countries on these facts.
    What a foolish statement. Most visas issued come due to relatives and family relations not because of such good economy standing as you blindness pretends to zero-in.

  13. #4880
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lobo Tropical View Post
     At least the DR as a small country are trying to do something, they obviously would have been better off with an alternative to coal pollution.
    What is your excuse for US policy and an increase of coal production, and the denial of pollution charges.

    Under Obama mining companies were ordered to  pay higher royalties to the government.
    The new US administration should be deeply embarrassed.

    Wouldn't it be great if the US would have helped the poor DR to set up a Natural Gas power plant, with a gas turbine, to reduce operating costs and pollution?
    Oh, I forgot pollution and climate change are just fake news!


    You. Are correct.....and you should have stopped after your first sentence

    But, the DR cannot have it both ways.

    I pointed out the fallacy of the statement “good for the environment” by suggesting the sources of where that power will/may be derived from.....coal.

    Nothing more/nothing less.

    Anything after your first sentence is irrelevant to the matter at hand, has no DR content.....and merely highlights your real agenda.

    Respectfully,
    Playacaribe2 




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