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Thread: E-Books and E-Documents of the Dominican Republic

  1. #51
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    Default Almoina, un exiliado gallego contra la dictadura trujillista


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    Default Ensayos y apuntes pedagógicos de Gregorio B. Palacín Iglesias


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    Default Reglamento de Migración de la República Dominicana / The New Migration Law


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  8. #58
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    Default Where Black rules white; a journey across Hayti

    Where Black rules white; a journey across Hayti

    My summary of the book linked above:

    This book was published in the beginning of the 20th century. It describes an extensive visit and exploration that an American did in Haiti. It was never clarified, or at least I didn't notice, in the book when the account took place; but in the chapter dedicated to his quick stint into Dominican territory near today's Jimaní, the author mentions that Hereaux had been killed a few months before. For this reason, its positively safe to assume that the visit was done in 1899, since that's when Hereaux was killed.

    Some of the most interesting aspects was his description of how thick the forest cover was pretty much everywhere he went in Haiti, which contrasts greatly with what is seen today in much of that country. Port-au-Prince is described as the filthiest place he has ever been to, quite a recurring theme among past and present visitors to that city. He mentions the great hospitality that characterizes the Haitian peasantry, even considered them more hospitable than the Dominicans he met at the border. He gave some attention to the corruption he experienced during his visit in Haiti, the lack of economic enterprise pretty much where ever he went, the illiteracy that characterized many of the leaders that the Haitian populace looked up to -especially the military generals-, the suspicion Haitians harbored towards foreigners, and how the few meaningful business that existed was in the hands of a few white foreigners that lived in the main coastal towns. He describes the tensions that existed then between the blacks and the mulattoes, with the despise the formers had towards the latter.

    Given the time period, there is a liberal use of now archaic terms to refer to different types of people and a hint of racism, although it appears that it was fueled by what he saw rather than imposing anything, but who knows.

    Either way, its an interesting read. He visits many areas of Haiti, starting in Jacmel, then Port-au-Prince, then makes a stint to the DR. He managed to visit Cap Haitien and the Citadel, and apparently was the first Western man to penetrate the interior of Haiti since the end of the Haitian Revolution, which at that time had only been a century before.

    His conclusion of the then future (I guess that would describe the expectation he had for what Haiti would had become by our time) was gloomy and filled with racism, which was typical of the time. Despite that, the irony of it all is that, judging by what Haiti has become, he was spot on in his prediction; although, Haiti lived up to his expectation for reasons other than those he assumed.

    All in all, an interesting read.

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  10. #59
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    Default Admixture among Dominicans and other population groups

    Average admixture based on DNA testing for certain populations.

    The PDF file linked here is the results of recent DNA testing to determine admixture levels in different groups of people from all over the world. These are averages for each population group, but there is no breakdown on geographic distribution; so, national averages will not always reflect variations on a regional level, except in highly homogenous populations.

    The results for the Dominican population is on page 12.

    Some of the other population groups are Colombians (page 12), Puerto Ricans (page 12), Spanish (page 10), English (page 9), Igbo-Nigerian (page 4), African Americans from southwestern USA (page 4) and many other groups.

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