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Thread: Haiti- What does the future hold?

  1. #1
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    Default Haiti- What does the future hold?

    Haiti- What does the future hold?


    I am sure I am not the only one who is pondering about Haitiís future after this massive earthquake. The 7.0 earthquake on July 12th destroyed the city of Port-au-Prince, and essentially the country which showed some signs of progress economically for the first time in decades.

    The international attention on Haiti since the natural disaster has been unprecedented with an out poor of financial and social support. Itís obvious that the destruction caused will have massive repercussions as time goes by and they will not only be felt in Haiti but also in the Dominican Republic.

    The gesture of support from its neighbouring country cannot be overlooked. The Dominican Republic, a developing country with high levels of poverty in its own right has shown its solidarity in the midst of a historical strained relationship between the two nations. Only time well tell how this recent disaster will impact the DR.

    I am glad I came across this article today in the Gazette because for the past two weeks I have been asking myself the burning question: When the international focus on Haiti shifts, whatís going to happen to the country and what are the leaders both local and international going to do to rebuild the country in the midst of the problems that have and will stem from this recent natural disaster? Millions of Haitians are homeless, children have become orphans, hunger is the order of the day for many, and social disorder and unrest is rising once again just to mention a few of the problems that come to mind etc.

    The article is just the writerís opinion but I am sure many agree, disagree or have similar thoughts.

    (Blame the U.S. and France for Haiti's woes)

    I believe Haitiís problems are buried deep in its past more so political and economic rather than cultural (as mentioned in many threads) but then again I am an outsider looking in. The vision and perspective I have will always be different vs. the opinion of Haitians and foreigners who actually live there. One aspect I know for sure is the internal struggle of the masses is probably going be the worst ever in its modern history. Some aspects of the past are definitely factors but like with any failed endeavour how far back do you go to analyze or find the root of the problem? Going back two hundred years and stating thatís the reason is neither the sole cause nor premise from which to begin in my opinion. I believe modern day events; letís say fifty years back play a huge role in Haiti being a failed nation.

    Once again this article gives me the opportunity to reflect accordingly and I will continue to do so as time goes by and Haiti begins its long recovery phase.

    Any recent photo from any newspaper gives a clear picture of what Haitians in Port-au-Prince and neighbouring cities or towns are experiencing. Itís going to be an uphill battled going forward (to say the very least).


    Source Canada.com


    Haiti Quake








    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 01-29-2010 at 09:12 PM.

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    The explotation of Haiti certainly didn't help. However, the fact remain during their independence that they massacred or exiled 99% of all who knew how to manage the land and run business and since then have barely lived above a tribal existence since then. To wit, the Haitan invaders of the DR made the farmers in Cibao give them food because nary a generation after their independence they had already mismanaged some of the most productive land the world has ever seen. Also, they have consistently rejected Western influence to their own demise and is reflected today in the poorest of the poor's prejudice towards foreigners - this I found out on my recent trip to Haiti.

    At this point, Haiti's future hold promise to be brighter than it ever has been before. They need to accept the the foreigners with open arms and do all to encourage them to stay and invest. I hope they do the right thing.

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    They will move away from PaP.

    A new capital will arise in CdH

    About 500K will flood the DR, pillaging as they go

    This is not a good thing

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    Quote Originally Posted by MerengueDutchie View Post
    They will move away from PaP.

    A new capital will arise in CdH

    About 500K will flood the DR, pillaging as they go

    This is not a good thing


    Please can you tell me the lottery numbers for next week.
    And also exactly what day the next tropical storm will arrive.
    Thanks in advance.

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    Chip's comment about "hold promise to be brighter than it ever has been before"
    is just a dream, before the earthquake BILLIONS of $$ was poured into Haiti and NOTHING came out of it, this also will be the same case, 3-4 months and it will be
    "disorder as usual".
    The only up side on this is the DR will be taking advantage of its proximity, this would be a great time to balance the budget, will all the foreign aid help coming in, if the DR wants to set their country on the "Black" this is the time, but then again the politicians will only be filling their pockets and of that their mistresses.

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    I'll try not to be so insensitive this time and be brief and be more optimistic than my last analysis where I was labeled cold hearted;

    Full reconstruction of PAP, infrastructure, roads, water, electricty able to reach at least 95% of the remaining and returning population.
    Plenty of jobs and more created in the reconstruction efforts, where the average Haitian will be paid at least $8USD a day, as opposed to the $2USD a day currently available.

    A larger, professionally trained (which it already is), highly paid Haitian Police force

    The new capital will be located in a place free of earthquakes as well as jobs in governance and business. Brasil transferred it's capital from Rio to Brasilia 60 years ago and it was a success. New buildings, roads, and it's being closer to the dominican border will create a dynamism and synergy that will also spur economic growth as well as closer ties to the DR!

    Haitians and foreign investors will flow to haiti and enable the nascent "Haitian miracle", Haiti will finally turn the corner as schools, universities and other technical schools open up allowing the majority of the population to catch up educationally.

    Literacy will be at 95%

    Tourism will increase.

    The economy of Haiti will grow to such an unprecedented degree that many Haitians in the DR will leave and contribute to the growth of their country, and the DR will finally realize the important contributions made by los hermanos Haitianos. Hairdressers, gallineros, vendedores de tarjeta Orange, plataneros will leave their dwellings in DR and go back to Ayiti.

    Dominican's will ask themselves why they aren't getting a cut of that and start to flock to Haiti. Haitians will get upset that these interlopers are there illegally, start deporting them and sadly be called rascists by the international community.

    Reforestion efforts will employ a substantial amount of people and food production will also begin it's march forward.

    Renewable energy companies will bring solar, aeolic, wind and hydrolic power to the people.

    With the proper steps the future for Haiti may just be very, very bright. I just convinced myself it could happen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lando calrisian View Post
    I'll try not to be so insensitive this time and be brief and be more optimistic than my last analysis where I was labeled cold hearted;

    Full reconstruction of PAP, infrastructure, roads, water, electricty able to reach at least 95% of the remaining and returning population.
    Plenty of jobs and more created in the reconstruction efforts, where the average Haitian will be paid at least $8USD a day, as opposed to the $2USD a day currently available.

    A larger, professionally trained (which it already is), highly paid Haitian Police force

    The new capital will be located in a place free of earthquakes as well as jobs in governance and business. Brasil transferred it's capital from Rio to Brasilia 60 years ago and it was a success. New buildings, roads, and it's being closer to the dominican border will create a dynamism and synergy that will also spur economic growth as well as closer ties to the DR!

    Haitians and foreign investors will flow to haiti and enable the nascent "Haitian miracle", Haiti will finally turn the corner as schools, universities and other technical schools open up allowing the majority of the population to catch up educationally.

    Literacy will be at 95%

    Tourism will increase.

    The economy of Haiti will grow to such an unprecedented degree that many Haitians in the DR will leave and contribute to the growth of their country, and the DR will finally realize the important contributions made by los hermanos Haitianos. Hairdressers, gallineros, vendedores de tarjeta Orange, plataneros will leave their dwellings in DR and go back to Ayiti.

    Dominican's will ask themselves why they aren't getting a cut of that and start to flock to Haiti. Haitians will get upset that these interlopers are there illegally, start deporting them and sadly be called rascists by the international community.

    Reforestion efforts will employ a substantial amount of people and food production will also begin it's march forward.

    Renewable energy companies will bring solar, aeolic, wind and hydrolic power to the people.

    With the proper steps the future for Haiti may just be very, very bright. I just convinced myself it could happen.


    This put a smile on my face.
    It is important to maintain a sense of humour in the midst of this nightmare.
    Thanks for that.

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    Don't forget about all those oil reserves, gold, and Iridium.

  9. #9
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    Default Haiti has to take into consideration that another quake (at anytime) is possible...

    I think Haiti's future really is anyone's guess right now. I still feel the leaders meaning the government and the international community really don't have a definite game plan as they continue to assess the impact, clean up the damage, house the homeless, find homes for children who are now orphans while Haitians try to get back to a 'routine' life in Port-au-Prince.

    Today marks three weeks since the quake and the situation is still chaotic which is expected and it will be for a while. I don't think Haitians will see any plans as to what exactly is going to happen with rebuilding the city for months even years. The focus will be just surviving day to day because the devastation was so vast, unexpected and without any back up plans by the government for a natural disaster of this magnitude.

    I think before any short term plan is decided by Preval and international leaders, they need to seriously consider this study which will be presented to them today. After reading the article, I think there is cause for great concern with the possibility of another quake looming (the time frame is unknown but they should assume sooner than later). Haiti really needs to work diligently with foreign experts from other countries who have experience in rebuilding cities after severe natural disasters.

    This is a great article posted in The Gazette yesterday:

    Haiti warned to brace for another big quake

    Lando calrisian's post represents what Haiti should have accomplished decades ago. However, now in light of the most recent disaster once again this country has been set back in time and it's anyone's guess for how long.


    Recent pictures taken by a photographer from The Gazette on Jan 30, 2010 show the current state of devastation after three weeks:






    Here is a brief comment in my mini blog:

    http://www.dr1.com/forums/blogs/mari...ake-haiti.html


    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 02-02-2010 at 11:02 AM.

  10. #10
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    Default How do Haitians feel?

    Well, well look at this. The opinions of some Haitians, or better said the sentiment of a segment of the population would like either Hugo Chavez, Obama or Fidel Castro to be the leader of their country. Many are disappointed with Preval's response after the earthquake. I mentioned my disbelief in another thread. Once again as an outsider looking in, it seems to me that the Haitian government is very nonchalant, sort of letting the world take over and control them, which further destroys the faith of Haitians regarding its government's ability to lead.





    However, these three leaders are who they admire? Especially two who come across as modern day 'mano dura' style and the other only time will tell. Would any of these leaders help change Haiti for the better? You know how the saying goes in Spanish- 'no es lo mismo llamar al diablo que verlo llegar'.


    Here is the brief article in today's Montreal Gazette:


    Disenchanted Haitians long for a Chavez, an Obama or a Castro



    -MP.

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