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Thread: Seora Maria de Thompson

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    Default Seora Maria de Thompson

    My dominican wife insists that her married name is Seora Maria Gomez de Thompson, forename, maiden name then "de" my family name and not as it would be English Mrs Maria Thompson. I do not know of this construction in any other language. Can someone explain to me the why of it and how it came about ? (Only the names are changed , to protect the innocent.).

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    I don't know why you post this on the Spanish 101 forum!!!
    When a woman gets married in the DR not sure about other Latin or Spanish speaking countries, they don't loose their last name. She's right her married name in the DR is Seora Maria Gomez de Thompson or a rough translation Mrs. Maria Gomez OF Thompson.

    Get her a Dominican passport with her married name and you will see that she is right.

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    Sorry you feel I posted to the wrong thread. Where should I have posted it? Mind you it still doesnt answer the question - why. She is my wife but I dont own her nor in the real sense is she a possession of mine nor of the family Thompson..

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    That is the reason when Mrs maria Cruz married to Fernado Madera her name change to Maria cruz De Madera.

    JJ

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    This is what is done in most or all Spanish speaking countries I'm familiar with, although there may be some where the practice of the wife adopting the husband's surname (in this case, she would become Sra. Maria Thompson). The "de Thompson" is optional. It's quite old fashioned and in the DR it's really only common among the upper classes. Most married women just go one using their name (Maria Gomez) and do not bother with the "de" bit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chirimoya View Post
    This is what is done in most or all Spanish speaking countries I'm familiar with, although there may be some where the practice of the wife adopting the husband's surname (in this case, she would become Sra. Maria Thompson). The "de Thompson" is optional. It's quite old fashioned and in the DR it's really only common among the upper classes. Most married women just go one using their name (Maria Gomez) and do not bother with the "de" bit.
    Yup. My elderly and very proper suegra uses "de" [actually, she now uses "vda" since my suegro died, denoting she's a vedova = widow] but my 5 Dominican [married] sisters-in-law all only use their maiden name. They were somewhat puzzled that I took my husband's surname when we married.

    Goofy gringa tradition

    AE

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    Small correction - vda is used for viuda which is the Spanish word for widow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by La Profe_1 View Post
    Small correction - vda is used for viuda which is the Spanish word for widow.
    Thanks for the correction - I sometimes cross Italian and Spanish. Mea culpa

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    There was a woman in Santiago named "Cuca" Llenas and she married Mister Rafael Bello. Her very popular married name was Cuca Llenas de Bello....

    JJ is not the only making with puns (that apparently nobody understood!!)

    HB

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    Dolores Fuerte de Barriga is the classic one.

    Also, Dulce Pia de Coco.

    any others?

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