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Thread: Living in Santiago on R.D. 22,763/month

  1. #1
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    Question Living in Santiago on R.D. 22,763/month

    Hi,

    I am new to the forum, and have been looking at posts for the past few days in order to get as much information as possible about living in Dominican Republic.

    I was recently offered a job in Santiago that pays R.D. 30,000/month. My rent and utilities is paid directly by my employer, so I do not have to worry about that.

    From what I have seen, I feel I could live very comfortably on R.D. 30,000/month since I do not have to worry about rent or utilities.

    However, I just calculated my student loans (I graduate in May) and unless I can get them deferred, I will be paying about USD $200/month (maybe a little less).

    So by my calculations, R.D. 30,000 - $200 would equal about R.D. 22,763/month.

    I would really appreciate any insight people can give about living in Santiago on this amount of money. I won't have a car or any of those associated expenses, so I believe my only expenses will be food, dining out, entertainment, etc. (Most of which are luxuries and I can adapt).

    So basically, what would life be like if I was living on R.D. 22,763/month and not having to worry about rent or utilities.

    Thank you so much! I have found so much great information on these forums and I feel like you all will be a great help as I get close and closer to moving to Santiago.

  2. #2
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    Thats the same budget I have brother, about $24K pesos a month. Yea, I suggest requesting a payment adjustment or deferrment on your student loans in order to save your money for emergencies. Especially since you dont have to worry about housing or utilities, you be fine.
    I figure if you relish your inner cheapskate, you can get along fine. I dont know how well your spanish is but you wont need a car much unless you want to go when and where you want to go. I mean if you dont want to take Taxis you can take carro publicos which are only 13 pesos(less than 30cents) per trip. Wherever you live there will be an American style supermarket there for commodities. I am able to eat out every night on the weekends(now if you like what you eat is another discussion, I frequently dont). I think I average less than 2000pesos during the week and like another 2000pesos on the weekends. Movies here are like 100pesos($3) for 1st runs. I pay like no more than 500pesos to get my clothes washed at my friends house or dry-cleaned at the lavanderia.
    Your biggest financial drain will be the female company you keep who will want you to cater to their every whim. If you can keep your wits about you then you can stick to your budget without compromise.

  3. #3
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    Somewhere along the line, I think you need to pay some taxes. Be careful about that.
    In order to work legally, you need residence and that can be expensive and/or time consuming. If you do it yourself, you can do it quite inexpensively.

    YOu can live simply in Santiago. Have fun and go to the beaches or mountains, rather than restaurants...more fun and cheaper.

    HB

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    I was doing fine spending under 30,000 a month including $325/month rent. Break down a daily budget there and it should be fine. What can really cost you is if you eat imported foods. Breakfast cereal is very pricey for example as are most imported canned goods. On the other hand, fruits and vegetables are much cheaper than in the US. You also save if you eat out for breakfast or lunch instead of dinner. $10-$15a day will take care of basics easily including eating breakfast out and a beer or two.

    Your biggest financial drain will be the female company you keep who will want you to cater to their every whim.

    --All too true. You'll make a better first impression by offering to buy groceries to have her cook for you and her kids at her home than taking her out to dinner and have the kids go hungry. If she wants a restaurant more than groceries, move on. Kids are almost always part of the package in the DR. Don't offer to help in the kitchen unless asked. If you stick to helping pay for food and maybe some school clothes, you'll weed out the gold diggers. If you really want to treat her though, pay for a trip to the beauty parlor. Nothing made my GF happier than half a day gossiping with her friends while she was getting pampered and drinking a few beers.

  5. #5
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    Default prepare :)

    i wish the best for you in your new life

    as hillbilly said..be prepared for taxes in the future

    i would like to add that it may be a good idea to have an exit plan
    should the job not last as long as you or your employer intended

    last thing you want is to be in a country with no money and no support

  6. #6
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    people- she's a girl. and she got offered a job at new horizons. she's a kid, so i think the job is just like a one or two year gig after college before moving on to bigger and better things.

    now run with that.

  7. #7
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    I live here in Santiago and will say a single person can certainly live on this amount of money very easily.

    Just stay away from eating out a lot and imported foods like people noted.

  8. #8
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    So if she's a girl ... stay away from Sankies ...

    I would reformulate Peter's quote:

    Your biggest financial drain will be the male company you keep who will want you to cater to their every whim.

  9. #9
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    When I calculate that, It comes out to about $630 US a month, from all I've seen in the archives people say you can't make it on that type of money... I've seen people that said they had an income of $1000 US a month get told that they would have to sit home and do absolutely nothing in order to survive. But now people are telling this young lady she will be fine on this amount of money? Which is it? I hope it is what you are telling her, but I don't know...

  10. #10
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    It totally depends upon what type of lifestyle a person wants to have. I live quietly, take taxis, eat out several times a week, pay for health insurance, have someone to clean and do laundry once a week - and the total monthly cost (including rent, utilities, cable, phone and internet) is around $30,000 pesos.

    Of course, I don't drink or smoke or go clubbing since that is not my "scene." My expenses are lower because I don't have a car and don't deal with the cost of repairs and fuel. And, no, I don't live in a poor Dominican barrio.

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