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  1. #21
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    With the 4.3V6 maybe. But I m American and only drive American cars and besides nothing is easier to fix than a GM bowtie.

  2. #22
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    "Originally Posted by RacerX
    I would drive a Chevrolet Blazer. But thats just me!"

    "talk about bad gas mileage!!"


    Today I had to change an A6 oil pan because of a speed bump, it will also need the entire suspension which was replaced completely in the end of August. The OE suspension kit - includes the 8 pcs of control arms, outer tie rod ends and sway bar links - without the struts! - a little over US$ 1400.00 plus shipping, plus labor - which is cheap here, only about US$ 220.
    You can buy a cheap chinese crap for 450-500, it will last 2-3 months. I didn't even mentioned the POS A/C compressor that they all have.

    Now its over US$ 1600 for an 8 month period. It would buy a lots of fuel for RacerX's Blazer.


    Audi / VW has the highest oil quality requirements, they have their own standard (see 502.00 - 505.00) so not all the synthetics are good for the motor, the oil price is double here than in the US so maintenance cost are higher. VWs are build up sludge extremely fast even with the high quality oil and regular maintenance - just google vw 1.8T sludge problem.

    Looks like you know all the issues, and got the money (don't need to worry about parts) and skills - even my best european tech can't replace the suspension in an hour and believe me, he did many of them. It takes about .4 hrs to R&R the engine cover properly.
    It shouldn't be hard to find one, because most of our VW / Audi clients said they will get rid of them quickly and never buy an other money eating poor quality POS like these again, or -since money isn't an issue - I'd just walk into a dealer and buy a new one - beside the warranty - nothing beats a new car smell.

    The Hun

  3. #23
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    And................in the 4.3 Chevy Vortec? Any weight motor oil will do thank you. I poured 5.5 quarts Dexron III in it last time.

    And you can always get that Isuzu 4 door pickup that the PN use. It is the same thing as the Chevrolet Colorado/GMC Canyon with weaker engine options and lamer interior dressing.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedrochemical View Post
    Between Santo Domingo and Higuey (and most of the way on to Punta Cana) and Santo Domingo and Santiago the roads are fine for a regular car.
    Even between Puerto Plata and Cabarete the roads are relatively well appointed.

    I would say like this:

    Very good conditions:

    Santo Domingo - San Pedro - La Romana - Higuey - Bavaro (via Macao) roads are in very good condition. there are some stretches between Higuey and Romana with patched potholes, which means some very slight bumps.

    Santo Domingo - Santiago road mainly in good condition, some patches

    Santo Domingo - Samana road in very good condition

    Santo Domingo - San Cristobal - Bani - Azua road in very good condition, some patches

    Azua - Barahona road in very good condition

    Azua - San Juan de la Maguana - Las Matas de Farfan - road in very good condition (further on towards Elias Piņa it gets worse).

    Santo Domingo - Monte Plata - Savana Grande de Boya - road in very good condition

    Monte Plata - Bayaguana - road in good condition, some patches

    El Seybo - Hato Mayor - road in very good condition

    Maimon - Cotui (last time I traveled it) road in very good condition

    Autopista Duarte - San Francisco (last time I traveled ) road in very good condition

    Autopista Duarte - Constanza (last time I traveled) some patches, but generally in good condition

    Friusa (Bavaro) - Cruce de Coco Loco - very good condition, newly asphalted

    Cruce de Macao (Bavaro) - Arena Gorda (Bavaro) - very good condition

    Cruce de Coco Loco (Bavaro) - Punta cana Airport - very good condition


    Acceptable conditions:

    Cruce de Yamasa - Yamasa

    Higuey - El Seybo

    Higuey - Veron (no potholes but bumps, was being re-asphalted, stopped half-way)

    Piedra Blanca - Maimon (some potholes, but avoidable)

    Barahona - Duverge

    Duverge - Jimani

    Duverge - Neyba

    Jimani - Neyba

    Barahona - Cabral - Polo Magnetico



    Now the terrible conditions:

    Bayaguana - Guerra

    Hato Mayor - Savana de la Mar

    Constanza - Jarabacoa

    Santiago - Carretera Turistica (Sosua)

    Vicente Noble - Neyba

    San Pedro - Hato Mayor
    Last edited by rubio_higuey; 04-14-2010 at 01:33 AM.

  5. #25
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    Add to the "terrible" list the road from Gaspar Hernandez to Tenares and both roads going to Miches.

  6. #26
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    Driving from Santo Domingo to Samana is great until you get to the end of the new highway. Then things get crappy.

    Also, as with most things in life, there are qualifiers.

    For example, driving from Santo Domingo east towards Juan Dolio, when you reach the new Ole supermarket near La Caleta there are a couple of suspension wrecking potholes between the outside lane and the second lane. Watch out for people swerving to avoid them!

    As always you need to keep your eyes peeled!

  7. #27
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    Default Buyer Beware if You Don't Buy a Toyota or Honda in the DR

    Welcome to the DR, gasoline at over 150 pesos a gallon for regular (the average octane at the refinery is 84, way below most manufacturer's minimum requirements), and you can add 15 pesos to the gallon to get that 90 octane here. This country has huge potholes, long lines of traffic at unpredictable times. Finally, let's talk about the average Dominican's driving skills, which involve a technique of hit the gas first and look later...maybe.

    As someone else pointed out, if you want to give control of your bank account to a mechanic, buy whatever you would like. If you want to go around in a beautiful new SUV, as a foreigner, and let all these people know who are looking for a "pendejo" that you have money in the bank, and probably in your car, and that one wrong turn or one bad neighbor, can turn you into a target, go ahead. It will be your quality of life and I have warned you with this message.

    If I were in your shoes, I would buy an older easy to fix Honda or Toyota, which will be significantly cheaper, parts will be readily available, and mechanics are more familiar with how to repair these vehicles, and the competition will drive down the cost of repairing it.


    Personally, I drive an 86 Toyota Corolla with 140,000 original miles on it that was owned by a little old lady in the barrio, who drove it to the supermarket once a week. She pampered the inside, so the interior looks great. I put a professional propane system in with copper tubing. Had to replace the motor early on, which ran me $ 15,000.0 pesos, including labor!!! I can find parts all day long since this is the common model used in the carro publico circuit.

    No one bothers me for money, and I even get a good laugh when people try to flag me down as if I am a carro. If anything breaks my average repair bill is RD$ 2,000.00 to fix anything including parts and labor. My ac works perfectly as do all the electronics on the car, and the beggars pass me over when they see what I'm driving.

    Not to say you have to go this far, but I live a very peaceful life this way, and transportation for me and my family is very economical. Just an idea for you to consider. Best of luck.

  8. #28
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    mrp,

    a 1986 Toyota Corolla? - Pimp stylin' dude!

    The blue-book value varies depending on how full the tank is.

  9. #29
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    Default What Blue Book Value

    FYI,

    I traded in a 2003 Daewoo Lanos for my 86 Corolla. I get an average of 5 people a month who ask me if I want to sell my car, when they see what good condition it's in. There are no blue books here, just supply and demand, believe it or not, the Corolla is worth more than many cars here that are 2000 and newer.

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