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Thread: Roof question

  1. #1
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    Default Roof question

    My house has a concrete roof. It was painted with white latex paint that was starting to peel and look unsightly. So this winter I stripped off the old paint and painted it in emulsion and changed the colour to a more traditional terracotta red.

    It looked much nicer, but I have now found out since the weather has improved that it was a mistake. The red absorbs the heat during the day making a significant rise in temperature inside the house, especially during the evenings.

    I see that a lot of houses have terracotta teja tiles on their roofs. What is the benefit from them? They certainly look nice. I'm guessing the theory that cool air is supposed to flow under them thereby insulating the heat from above. Do they work that well?

    Would it be a worthwhile investment to get my roof tiled? Would anyone have an idea of cost on a 300m2 house?

    All opinions are welcome. Thanks

    Beeza

  2. #2
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    First, tiles sold in the Americas often are a poor protection from the weather prevalent in this country. Even roof in Florida are made impermeable first underneath the tiles... tiles then are for looks and yes, they can cool a home a little for the added air space in between them and the actual roof.
    Still, light colored tiles will keep a home cooler than dark colored ones.

    I would suggest y DO impermeabilize your concrete roof and, they tile it with a light colored terracota tile. There are also paints to tint existing tiles to a lighter color. Still, I would always recommend treating the concrete roof first.

    Roof jobs are better done RIGHT at once. USe good quality materials and qualified workers. At the end, it's cheaper!


    ... J-D.

  3. #3
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    concrete roofs are fine if they are coated with the correct paint, ,,,,,you will find the teracotta tiles over here are not realy waterproof and heat applied ashphalt backed felt is applied under the tiles to pevent water ingress, also the existing concret must be primed with a special primer, yes there is a certain ammount of air space under the fitted tiles to help keep the roof cool,

  4. #4
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    theres a guy lives in sosua who has started building maintenance company , very reputable with good recomendations and 20 yrs experience in the UK, hes done lots of stuff for us, and we are very sattisfied , and he even turns up when he says he will i think you can email him on [email protected] , hope this helps

  5. #5
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    Terra cotta roof tiles are very heavy added with the concrete adhesive. I would strongly advise making sure your concrete roof is durable and stable enough, with plenty of rebar reinforcement. Best to check that first before researching anything else.
    Also, I would advise to rubberize your roof for water penetration (for long term)and then paint it a reflective silver color to keep the heat from absorbing.
    Just my 2 peso's worth

  6. #6
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    The roof tiles that you get here are made of cement. You need to apply a layer of asphalt before the tiles.
    Discuss it with a builder, I will PM you with a recommendation.

  7. #7
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    I've always thought that it would be interesting to experiment with the idea of adding a spacer structure (aluminum rack) in between an inpermeablized concrete roof and the tiles, for added air circulation/heat insulation.

    I've seen a couple of homes here, with a cana roof finish over concrete roofs. Most have wooden racks to attach the cana and also prevent the cana to rot laying on top of the concrete un-aired.

    ... J-D.

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