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Thread: 143 jobs are needed

  1. #1
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    Default 143 jobs are needed

    As good samaritans we must help. Any vacancies available?

    another 143 dominican prisoners repatriated from us

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    Quote Originally Posted by Afgan View Post
    As good samaritans we must help. Any vacancies available?

    another 143 dominican prisoners repatriated from us
    I am sure there could be some some latrine cleaning job openings found at Najayo. A few may even make some extra income picking up soap bars from the communal shower floors.


    ... J-D.

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    fortunately there are some euro and american criminals going the other way

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    Quote Originally Posted by Afgan View Post
    As good samaritans we must help. Any vacancies available?

    another 143 dominican prisoners repatriated from us
    The A1 resort's are alway's looking for new animation character's, perhaps you should point them in that direction so they can catch a ride to some other country through romance.

    It sure beats having to actually work for a living, would you not agree, AK47?

    Or is it 74?
    Last edited by mike l; 05-22-2010 at 11:14 PM. Reason: I don't know guns is it 74

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    143? More like over 2000 in this year alone.
    And why shouldn't they be sent back to the DR? It costs more to keep them in jail in the US than most working Americans make in one year. Add to that the costs of caring for the inmates family while they are in jail. This reply goes for any immigrant in a US jail.
    In reverse, the DR should send home the US prisioners in their jails.

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    Anyways, I have to confess that I have no real knowledge about what happens to these goons once they arrive here (?).
    I would tend to believe that "technically" their "debt to society" has been "paid" off, at least in the country they are deported from.

    Are they just released into the island once they have been received and registered (I do seem to remember reading that they do get registered by the PN)? Or do they face further legal issues?

    I must say, while I don't screen the local news in depth much, I can not recall having learned of any crimes being blamed on these felons (?).

    ... J-D.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Afgan View Post
    As good samaritans we must help. Any vacancies available?

    another 143 dominican prisoners repatriated from us
    I guess the USA should review their immagration policy.

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    JD,

    I haven't read about many criminals being apprehended, period, but that only indicates the level of professionalism of the national police, and not much else.

    My guess is, given the specific job skills inherent in this particula population, they have few options except for following the same career track they followed in the US and Canada.

    But since there are no viable statistics regarding the results of repatriation, I have no idea whether these individuals become gainfully employed or not. It would be nice to know, but I doubt we'll ever get a clear picture of what becomes of these re-patriots.

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    Quote Originally Posted by catcherintherye View Post
    JD,

    I haven't read about many criminals being apprehended, period, but that only indicates the level of professionalism of the national police, and not much else.

    My guess is, given the specific job skills inherent in this particula population, they have few options except for following the same career track they followed in the US and Canada.

    But since there are no viable statistics regarding the results of repatriation, I have no idea whether these individuals become gainfully employed or not. It would be nice to know, but I doubt we'll ever get a clear picture of what becomes of these re-patriots.
    Check the Call Centers as thats where most of them wind up. Then people from the US are stupid enough to give them their social security numbers and later the primo in nueba yol has them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bienamor View Post
    Check the Call Centers as thats where most of them wind up. Then people from the US are stupid enough to give them their social security numbers and later the primo in nueba yol has them.
    Well, I'd rather see them sit tight in a call center than being what... tossed around on the street until somebody offers them a "job" they'd be more "qualified" to "take care of"?

    Is the idea of a jail release not exactly the hope that the particular individuals find their ways back into "society" as a productive, law abiding member?

    I mean, that would be like "whoaw"... SUCCESS!

    But YES, I understand Bienamor's worries about the Social Security number link brought up!
    Would be nice that off-shore call centers were not allowed to handle critical ID's at all. It doesn't take ex-cons and felons for that information to "leak" out into the wrong hands.



    ... J-D.

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