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  1. #1
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    Default a/c--whole house options

    anyone have central air? mine is 1800 squ.ft house. one level.4 brs.
    i'm now using one small window unit..want to go ----- cool... any help??

  2. #2
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    Central air is available. BUT few have it or use due to the cost of electricity!!!! You need to be very well off to afford that!!!!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by barriolad View Post
    anyone have central air? mine is 1800 squ.ft house. one level.4 brs.
    i'm now using one small window unit..want to go ----- cool... any help??

    Well first of all, are you aware energy wise what you are asking for?
    Running A/C on a whole homes WILL run your electricity bill over the 699.99 KWh whack rate... you will pay anywhere up from USD 200.oo/month.
    You also realize, that in this country it is not uncommon to experience power blackouts most every day and that an inverter system will NOT run such a rig and a gen-set may have to be quite largely sized to provide the power needed.
    You will also have to protect the compressor unit from damage it may suffer from repeated power cuts (especially when the power comes back fairly quickly [delay unit needed]).

    That being said, many if not most detached homes here, EVEN in some of the 4 most luxurious developments do NOT have central air. And maybe not only for above considerations.

    Thus, you will most likely NOT find many businesses which effectively specialize in CALCULATING and installing central A/C in single family detached homes, except maybe around Santo Domingo.
    But you will find, again in the major cities, some companies which specialize in commercial A/C and also equip modern upper scale apartment buildings.
    Hard (aluminum lined hard foam or metal) and soft (corrugated and insulated flex-pipes) ducting material is available. So are compressor and evaporator sets as commonly used in the US.

    Installing a central A/C system in a home, is not as complex a job as it can be to CALCULATE and plan it!
    There now are computer programs available to do that for you. They estimate flow and and air volumes and directions, taking the home's geographical location and orientation (N-S) into account as well including each room's use, size of windows etc into the equation. THIS IS OF UTMOST IMPORTANCE if you want an effective BALANCED A/C result throughout the home!

    If you want to do it yourself, there ARE books available in the US (google it) and probably the calculation programs (you input a simplified schematic of the home and some data) may be downloadable "for FREE" somewhere by now.

    I had to do it in Spain, where central A/C in single family detached homes is also NOT as common as one would assume... it was interesting, even fun and we had excellent results. But we were lucky to have had help and being given a custom calculated "blue print" of our ducts, in sizes, forms and shapes (we used the aluminum lined hard foam which can be cut on site to create custom size and shaped ducts. Very wind noise conscious and well insulated!)

    ... J-D.

  4. #4
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    I have individual AC units in all my 4 bedrooms and recently added an AC unit for the living room. My bill does not exceed RD$8,000 despite me being charged 13 pesos per kilowatt as I live in a private hotel run development. (Granted, the AC's are not run during the day)

    I have a 3bedroom condo in The Bahamas that runs on central air, smaller than my house, and in the summer I pay up to US$1,000 per month in electricity. Rates should be similar.

    The differences can be huge.

  5. #5
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    Default a/c for house

    my house has a forced air unit that we do not use... i would love to sell it because we have never used it.

    pm me if you want

  6. #6
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    Check out Mr. Slim zone units...it might be the way to go

  7. #7
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    Plant trees around the house and then install widows units depending in the size of the room, this is the cheapest way to make it cooler...

    JJ

  8. #8
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    I have seen the tri or quad zone system like this Sanyo in a 3 bedroom condo in Santiago. Place was about 1350 sq. ft. and system was more than needed to cool the whole condo.

    QUAD ZONE 12+7+7+7 kBTU AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM KMS1272/KMS0772-3/CM2472

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumbo View Post
    I have seen the tri or quad zone system like this Sanyo in a 3 bedroom condo in Santiago. Place was about 1350 sq. ft. and system was more than needed to cool the whole condo.

    QUAD ZONE 12+7+7+7 kBTU AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM KMS1272/KMS0772-3/CM2472
    One compressor into 2 or 3 or 4 split units certainly is an option and they are available in Santiago and Santo Domingo... maybe even a little cheaper than the one suggested (as an example above).
    However, each split runs the same BIG compressor capable of runing 2, 3 or all 4 units. In other words, when using only one or two splits, the system may have a somewhat questionable efficiency rating.
    These systems are being sold with the "NO ducting needed" argument. Keep in mind however, that there are two insulated (padded) copper pipes and power lines going back and forth between the compressor and EVERY split. One can do that by adding often unsightly PVC channels on the exterior of the home (preferably hidden right under the roof line) to avoid condensation issues inside the walls.

    I must say, I am not a great fan of split A/C systems, even though I agree, that they can often be the only solution, especially as a post construction add on. Still, IF somebody considers adding several splits, I would usually recommend adding as many separate stand along split pairs as needed (a dedicated compressor for each split). First, believe it or not, they often turn out cheaper to buy than a 4/1 or 3/1 set and you can "manage" repair issues better (swap units around until repaired).

    Finally. You will never experience the comfort of a proper central A/C system with split A/C systems.
    But as some have not only suggested but demonstrated with examples, running central A/C with power at up to USD o.30 a Kw... you know...


    ... J-D.

  10. #10
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    Default Cool Tubes...

    Cool Tubes is another option if you have the space outside. Cool Tubes is a 70's name, now their called Earth Tubes.

    The concept is very old tho, using the earths cooler temps to bring in cooler air. Monticello has half-buried passage ways leading to the main house that are thought to have been used for cooling the main house. the romans used them, Cavemen did it, etc....

    The cool air brought in is best pulled in by Whole House Fan. Works better in a two story house, but not critical to the design.

    It works, I've built and used them. If done correctly, along with shading, insulated windows, etc, you won't be able to leave it on all nite. You'll freeze your, uh.....you'll be cold.

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