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  1. #1
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    Default Ominous sounds from our yard...

    since I renewed my lease for the house, I have been hearing very strange sounds from the backyard...

    It is an animal, just to be ahead of all the wise-cracks...

    I can only describe the sound like the very rapid roffling of an African drum... quite deep in sound, and lasting for up to a minute at a time...

    It starts around dusk, and lasts throughout the nite...

    I first suspected my landlord not happy with the deal he agreed to, but honestly cannot imagine the poor bloke sitting in my backyard making those sounds... lol

    anybody any idea what it could be with the vague description I was able to provide??? (I'm thinking toad???...)

  2. #2

  3. #3
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    That guy was a Brit toad

    here are some more
    Frog and Toad Calls

  4. #4
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    Might it be an Antillean Nighthawk?
    They love to 'sing' at night...

    Antillean Nighthawk - Whatbird.com

  5. #5
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    I'm afraid it is bad news... the bugger we hear at night is not JR crawling home from a bar, trying to forget the purchase of his flat net... but is a cane toad...

    DECC | Help stop the spread of cane toads

    they are apparently huge, and poisonous... on this website there is some article about a supertrap for cane toads.. but am unable to open this pdf for one reason or another..

    does anybody know how to trap those guys... (they can kill dogs!!!)

    Thanks for all the help...

    Peter

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Thanks Lambada...

    for one reason or another my comp does not want to open the super trap... could you maybe copy it and post it???

    the other trap sounds marvelous, but I think I would have to import it from Australia which is not really an option...

    but thanks anyway

    Peter

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    does anyone here have any idea on how to find these creatures in daylight???

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by belgiank View Post
    Thanks Lambada...

    for one reason or another my comp does not want to open the super trap... could you maybe copy it and post it???
    It's 2 pages with pics so not sure how a copy/paste will work. But, here goes:


    Cane Toad control
    Using the Super Trap
    The Super Trap is a self sufficient Cane Toad catching unit that can be used along with other methods to control the spread of Cane Toads. The super trap can be used in a semi permanent situation and requires only a minimal amount of monitoring.
    The Super Trap
    When set up with adequate water and all parts functioning correctly, the Super Trap can house captured toads humanely for an extended period of time.
    Components
    25 gauge x 25mm x 25mm holes galvanised wire mesh.
    20watt solar panel*
    12volt battery
    Black UV lights
    Solar panel charge controller MP3128*
    Trough with float valve
    Drum for water
    One way perspex finger gates**
    * available from Jaycar Electronics
    * *available from Frogwatch - Frogs, Toadlets, Tadpoles, and Toads


    Construction
    Make a wire cage 1200mm x 1000mm x 500mm.
    Measure the trap in half.
    Cut holes in proposed section, large enough to be able to remove toads.
    Cut an access hole in the proposed rear section, large enough to be able to remove toads.
    Make a divider and fix it to the roof of the trap ensuring it sits 50-100mm from the trap floor.
    Attach a light to this divider.
    Place a water trough and drum in the rear of the cage.
    Secure solar panel.
    Insulate rear enclosed section with insulation.
    Cover top of trap.
    Super trap is now ready for use.
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    UV black lights available from electronics outlets
    How does the trap work?
    During the day the lights are off, at nightfall the solar panel controller turns the lights on. These will remain on until the solar panel detects light, the lights are then switched off, and the charging of the battery is continued.
    When the lights are on they attract insects, the insects in turn attract the toads. The toads push on the one way finger gates to enter the trap to feed on the insects and become captured. During their stay in the trap they feed at their own will at night and seek shelter and water from the trough during the day.
    Door showing finger gates manufactured by Frogwatch, Northern Territory
    An example of a Super trap
    Published by: Department of Environment and Climate Change NSW
    59 - 61 Goulburn Street, Sydney. Phone: 1300 361 967
    web: Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water NSW
    Department of Environment and Climate Change NSW.
    Photographs Adam

  10. #10
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    Here is the preferred, non-toxic method used in Australia to kill cane toads:

    There are lots of ways to kill cane toads, and some are really brutal.

    To kill a cane toad humanely, the easiest approach is to pick the animal up (gloves are a good idea, to ensure you don’t get exposed to the toad’s poison!) and put it in a plastic bag, then pop the bag into the fridge. After a few hours the toad will be pretty much asleep (although still very much alive) and you can pop the bag into the freezer. (some of the sources say that after the frig and before the freezer, you should whack it on the head and crush its skull to ensure that it is dead, but that might be messy in your freezer).

    Leave it there in the freezer for a long time – preferably a few days – because there are lots of stories about apparently-frozen toads coming back to life if they haven’t spent long enough in the freezer!
    Last edited by el forastero; 06-23-2010 at 01:53 AM.

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