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Thread: Private schools for poor children

  1. #1
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    Default Private schools for poor children

    I do some voluntary teaching of English in a charity school for Haitian children attached to an Evangelical Church. I and my friends are increasingly involved with fund-raising to help the school in other ways (although most of us are not necessarily Evangelicals or even Christians).

    The pupils in the class where I assist are aged from 12 to 16. I have become aware that one girl in my class, aged 12, is very bright. Her class teacher tells me that she is also the best in every other subject taught. She has an excellent attitude, is neat, methodical and punctilious in other tasks as well.

    In my country of origin a child with this talent would be certain to attend university and would expect to do well there assuming she continued to progress in the same way.

    This girl is hoping to be a nurse. This is of course a very honorable and useful profession but, firstly, it is doubtful if she will even have the opportunity to enrol for nursing training, and, secondly, she has the natural ability to be aiming much higher.

    I am beginning to wonder if it would be beneficial to sponsor her to attend a regular school. I assume that her parents do not have the necessary documentation to enrol her in a state school.

    I was justing starting to enquire about the possible costs of this when I saw this article on DR1 today:
    "For a poor family to send children to a modest private school can cost RD$20,000 per child, for the middle class in mid-range private schools RD$74,000 and for the rich in top bilingual schools RD$500,000, reports Listin Diario. The school year starts on 17 August in the DR."

    I assume these are annual costs? If so, the "modest private school" would probably be within our means and sustainable through the following years.

    But would attending a "modest private school" actually assist her education very much? For example, would she encounter problems of prejudice? She seems totally fluent in Spanish, though my own Spanish is not advanced enough to judge and I would need to check on that.

    These are very early days. I have not yet discussed the matter with her parents or with the teachers at the charity school she now attends.

    Though I have lived in the DR less than a year, I am very aware of the problems of trying to help people here and the unexpected and sometimes unfortunate consequences that can arise from even the best-intentioned acts. The phrase "No good deed goes unpunished" is never far from my mind. As a child's interest and happiness is involved I will tread very slowly and carefully, which means that even if we proceed with this plan she will not be ready to start school as early as August.

    I would be grateful for any advice or suggestions you may have. PM me if you think that might be more appropriate.

  2. #2
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    Even in private school - birth certificates are required. Private schools are subject to inspections from the school district officials and have to comply with the same rules as public schools, more actually.

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    1) Where are you located?
    2) I like the idea. There are both NGO and local programs to help these bright students

    When I know where you are, maybe I can come up with some ideas..

    HB

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    Quote Originally Posted by bob saunders View Post
    Even in private school - birth certificates are required. Private schools are subject to inspections from the school district officials and have to comply with the same rules as public schools, more actually.
    Even if she was born in the DR, she may not be a citizen of the country or have a birth certificate. Other posters are welcome to correct me if I in incorrect, but my understanding is that children of Haitian parents illegally in the country are not eligible for a birth certificate or Dominican citizenship.

    I have heard that there are ways of getting around this, but it would be imprudent to post ways of skirting the law on this public forum.

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    this is a great way to do good!
    surprised, readers? no need, because while dv8 does not support giving money to the poor she supports wholeheartedly educating them.
    back to the subject. it was my understanding, that all children born in DR have the right to dominican citizenship, no?
    if not, a simple bribe in the oficina de cedulacion should bear the fruit of a spanking new cedula.
    alternatively you may want to contact private fundations like fundacion brugal - they do help with education of kids like the one you just described.

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    Also, all children have the right to a birth certificate, no matter their nationality. It is a basic document guaranteed under the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, I do believe, or UNICEF, something like that.

    Once that hurdle is cleared, the road should be easier.

    HB

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    Education is indeed the road to take, and encouraging bright students by helping them and their families, is only to be applauded...

    I know the Jesuit school here in jarabacoa provides some promising students from poor families with the necessary education, in the hope of helping them.

    I believe the price is around 120 $ per year, so neglectable...

    Having said this, and promoting all efforts to improve education of promising students, I want to stress, this should not not be religion related...

    I have several Dominican friends who refuse to let their children go to one of the "excellent" Christian schools, because religion is forced upon the children...

    Education is of primary importance... religion is something everybody should be free on to decide...

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    Most private schools, religious or not, sponsor a few children (free for tuition and registration) and it seems from my experience that a few children whose parents are poor but the child shows promise are sponsored by middle class Dominicans.

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    Isn't there any possibility that she can get a scolarship (sorry wrong typing but I don't know the exact word in English) either here in the DR or in the States?

    There are programs available for high intelligent children, don't know how it would work for this child however...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Acira View Post
    Isn't there any possibility that she can get a scolarship (sorry wrong typing but I don't know the exact word in English) either here in the DR or in the States?

    There are programs available for high intelligent children, don't know how it would work for this child however ...
    I am not suggesting she is some kind of exceptional prodigy. Just a sensible and intelligent girl apparently from a stable and viable family background who deserves a lot better than what she presently has in prospect (that is to say, a struggle to find even the lowest-paid job once she leaves school), and one who would be graduate material if she lived in North America or Europe.

    If anyone can supply leads re: scholarships I would be grateful, but money is not the primary problem as I am fairly confident I could raise funds to sustain her education. The problems are finding a school which is better than she has now, gaining admittance if she doesn't have documentation, and whether she would be accepted and happy in that environment.

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