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  1. #1
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    Default Blueberries in DR?

    Are there blueberry growers in DR? If so, where are they?

    AE

  2. #2
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    Never seen any but you can buy them sometimes in Pola and Nacional. Nacional had them fresh and also frozen.

  3. #3
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    The are grown mostly in northeastern states in the US, and in Maine in particular. They are starting to develop heat-tolerant varieties, but they are not commercially cost effective yet. They might be able to grow in the high mountains of the DR, but my bet is they are all imported.

  4. #4
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    I canīt find blackberries either.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by granca View Post
    I canīt find blackberries either.
    They had them fresh at Playero in Sosua but they did not sell quick enough so they moved them to the frozen fruit section

  6. #6
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    PriceSmart sells a 3 pound bag of frozen Dole blueberries for around $400 pesos...they're not the same as fresh, but they're great...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo View Post
    Are there blueberry growers in DR? If so, where are they?

    AE
    Probably not. The first reason would be the market. I grew blueberries commercially in N. Florida in the early 80's for the local U-Pick market and expanding shipping market. Since blueberries are not a traditional fruit in the DR, I'm not sure the ex-pat population is large enough and concentrated enough to tempt anyone to plant. They would have to plant in the higher elevation areas for the plants to get enough cold hours to set flowers and fruit. They'd need acid soils around pH 4.5-5.5 naturally or be able to amend the soil with peat or sulfur. They'd need several varieties to promote good cross-pollination. They'd need well drained soils. They'd need disease resistant varieties primarily to Phytophthora. And they'd need to be able to plant now and wait about 4 years before they started harvesting in quantity. The one good thing the DR does have is labor. Farmer.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farmer View Post
    Probably not. The first reason would be the market. I grew blueberries commercially in N. Florida in the early 80's for the local U-Pick market and expanding shipping market. Since blueberries are not a traditional fruit in the DR, I'm not sure the ex-pat population is large enough and concentrated enough to tempt anyone to plant. They would have to plant in the higher elevation areas for the plants to get enough cold hours to set flowers and fruit. They'd need acid soils around pH 4.5-5.5 naturally or be able to amend the soil with peat or sulfur. They'd need several varieties to promote good cross-pollination. They'd need well drained soils. They'd need disease resistant varieties primarily to Phytophthora. And they'd need to be able to plant now and wait about 4 years before they started harvesting in quantity. The one good thing the DR does have is labor. Farmer.
    Thank you. For me, this is great information. I have not been trying to grow blueberries, but have been struggling for almost five years with a vegetable garden. I live in a low area, not in the mountains. I have tried both U.S. seeds and tropical seeds. Some things produce. Others, not. I enrich the soil at regular intervals, but perhaps not properly for what is needed.

    My overall assessment is that the summer heat and direct sun are harsh, unless the plants are watered every hour or so.

    Lindsey

  9. #9
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    We've tried a lot of different things in Playa Najayo, but have had the most luck with onions, peppers, yuca, guandules, eggplant. Typical Dominican fare. Tomatoes didn't do too well. We definitely do best with the trees: limon, avocado, mango, platano. Up in Ocoa it's a different story, everything seems to grow there, even figs.

    A small section of our land in Playa Najayo that had been recently planted by my husband and our caretaker:


    AE

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