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Thread: illegal border crossings?

  1. #1
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    Default illegal border crossings?

    From DR1 new today

    57,000 more illegal Haitians

    Statistics released by the Department of Migration show that after the 12 January 2010 earthquake in Haiti, some 57,119 Haitians who crossed the border to the DR on market days have stayed on in the country illegally. A spokesman for the department told Diario Libre that the figure probably does not even account for 50% of those who have entered illegally. The Migration Department says that 83 inspectors have been dismissed in the past 14 months for complicity with people smuggling, serious faults on the job, allowing the departure of people with legal exit restrictions, administrative corruption, forgery of documents or links to drug trafficking networks. "


    Can anyone tell me how they know? Anyone who has watched the border crossing during market days can attest to the fact that it is chaos.. There is no one checking papers, no one standing with a clicker, no orderly one by one line...

    I have watched Dajabon, Elias Pinas and Pedernales and it is the same for all three.. although Pedernales is smaller.

    How can they possibly come up with these figures?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainannie View Post
    How can they possibly come up with these figures?
    Because they are being paid a great deal and need to show something for it???

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip View Post
    Because they are being paid a great deal and need to show something for it???
    yes most likely! If people had never seen the border crossings during market days they might well believe this story.... and that would make them think that there is some sort of control....

    Of course, how the press can just publish this sort of thing without any comment... I mean,, most of the nationals have reporters who have seen the market, I think.

    Amazing!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainannie View Post
    yes most likely! If people had never seen the border crossings during market days they might well believe this story.... and that would make them think that there is some sort of control....

    Of course, how the press can just publish this sort of thing without any comment... I mean,, most of the nationals have reporters who have seen the market, I think.

    Amazing!!
    Dominican reporting is spotty at best. I can remember watching the World Series and the Olympics here in DR in 2000 and the little I understood made me embarrassed for the announcers. I can remember them saying Andy Pettitte's career was over at the point. Of course it's a good thing he didn't think so because he has made 99.7 MILLION US since then in salary alone. Good grief.

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    I'm personally familiar with two clandestine border crossings. They are land routes, and are used only during the night. One of the crossings enters the DR at a heavily forested region Northwest of the town of Hondo Valle, where travelers walk their way down the Sierra de Neiba south of El Cercado and down to Vallejuelo, to the highway leading to San Juan de la Maguana. Alternatively, travelers walk down toward Galván and then to the bateyes near Neiba, to link up with the Barahona highway. The other crossing is south of the town of Bánica, where travelers cross the Artibonite river hours before sunrise, and walk up the mountain toward the East, arriving early evening north of Sabaneta, where they walk down to the town of Juan de Herrera and toward the highway, to San Juan de la Maguana and beyond. Haitians have a system of clandestine motorcycle (motoconcho) transportation, with some stations within sight of military garrisons.

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    One simply answer - Money. It all boils down to Money. Haitians come to the Dominican Republic in search of better living conditions. Buscones do their part and help smuggle them in. The companies who run the Batey's are not complaining much either as they get 'free' labor. And the Dominican Government does not have the money nor apparently the organization to prevent both illegal crossing and illegal smuggling, as it would require an entire mentality change toward why accepting bribes is not a good thing and why. Things will not change greatly until CESFRONT really starts clamping down. And thats not going to happen until they can resolve within themselves why accepting bribes (and other benefits) is not worth it anymore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by elbachatero6504 View Post
    One simply answer - Money. It all boils down to Money. Haitians come to the Dominican Republic in search of better living conditions. Buscones do their part and help smuggle them in. The companies who run the Batey's are not complaining much either as they get 'free' labor. And the Dominican Government does not have the money nor apparently the organization to prevent both illegal crossing and illegal smuggling, as it would require an entire mentality change toward why accepting bribes is not a good thing and why. Things will not change greatly until CESFRONT really starts clamping down. And thats not going to happen until they can resolve within themselves why accepting bribes (and other benefits) is not worth it anymore.
    Actually, Haitians who cross the border in the two places I've indicated, don't have to bribe anyone. They have a well established underground transportation system of their own that ferries them anywhere in the DR. It is worth mentioning that all along the central border region, well into DR territory, Dominicans are abandoning their abodes and migrating to towns and cities, and all the abandoned houses and properties are being filled by Haitians. It's a real sight!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainannie View Post
    How can they possibly come up with these figures?
    I always ask myself this same question, albeit I tend to do it whenever an NGO group appears in the press (especially the Jesuits) claiming that X number of Haitians entered the country with the complicity of the authorities.

    How do they know?

    Of course, a few years ago it was discovered that the Jesuit church in Dajabón was being used as a 'safe house' for illegal Haitian immigrants to spend the night before continuing towards Santiago with the priest responding with the excuse that Haitians are needed in Dominican farms.

    So, maybe that's how they know and it makes perfect sense, they know X number entered illegally because that was the X number for whom they looked the other way, just like the Jesuits except that they can only count the number of Haitians they helped enter the DR by paying the bribes for them.

    In either case, whatever numbers are made public are all understatements, and no one really takes those numbers seriously.

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    Default Bull Spit

    [QUOTE=elbachatero6504;912105] The companies who run the Batey's are not complaining much either as they get 'free' labor. within QUOTE]

    Most of them don't end up in Batey's! Unless your calling little Haiti in Santo Domingo a Batey. Most end up in construction jobs, living in the building that they are building, or begging on the street.

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    [QUOTE=bienamor;912145]
    Quote Originally Posted by elbachatero6504 View Post
    The companies who run the Batey's are not complaining much either as they get 'free' labor. within QUOTE]

    Most of them don't end up in Batey's! Unless your calling little Haiti in Santo Domingo a Batey. Most end up in construction jobs, living in the building that they are building, or begging on the street.
    There are hundreds of Haitians in Jarabacoa and there is no such thing as a Batey in Jarabacoa. Most work in construction or farming (vegetables) and they either rent from Dominicans, or stay in a rooming house. Many stay in little huts behind poor dominican homes.

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