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Thread: Boogie Nights: Bachata is stepping into salsa's territory

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    Default Boogie Nights: Bachata is stepping into salsa's territory

    Boogie Nights: Bachata is stepping into salsa's territory
    If the latter seems too complex and fast, this more slower, smoother dance from the Dominican Republic might be the thing.




    By Rachel B. Levin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
    September 30, 2011


    Bachata Thursdays



    Where: The Granada, 17 S. 1st St., Alhambra

    When: Thursdays; beginner and intermediate classes 8:30 p.m., nightclub 9:30 p.m.

    Price: $14 for single class (includes nightclub cover); $5 nightclub cover

    Info: (626) 227-2572; DANCE STUDIO, NIGHTCLUB, BANQUET FACILITY, RESTAURANT & BAR | 17 S. First St, Alhambra, CA, 91801 626.227.2572

    A couple of years ago on salsa dance floors across Los Angeles, a new trend began to emerge. Amid the frenetic, conga-driven salsa tunes, DJs started to slip in a few tracks of bachata — a romantic, guitar-based music that originated in the Dominican Republic.

    Those who stayed on the floor traded the showy spins of salsa for the cheek-to-cheek embrace and fluid footwork of bachata dance. But for the majority of patrons, says Earl Miller Jr., owner of salsa spot the Granada in Alhambra, the bachata interlude was "the time to go and buy a drink or go to the restroom."

    Fast forward two years, and bachata has become a phenomenon that even the most hard-core salseros can't ignore. As bachata recording artists like Aventura and Prince Royce have topped the charts on mainstream Latin radio, bachata dance has exploded at local clubs. No longer confined to just a few songs in an evening of salsa, bachata now has a dedicated night at the Granada and at Stevens Steakhouse in Commerce, both well-established salsa venues.



    "I tested out bachata on our salsa night," Miller says, "and it just spread like wildfire. It became the hit, the thing. Now even the salseros, they're falling in love with the dance."

    One reason for bachata's rapid rise may be its accessibility to newcomers. While the dizzying turns and patterns of salsa may cause inexperienced dancers to shy away, the basic side-to-side steps of bachata are easy to learn. Partners often dance with their chests connected, relying on swinging hips and fluttering feet to express their style rather than attention-grabbing stunts.

    That ease of movement won over Vanessa Villalobos, 21, of West Covina — a self-described bachata addict and regular at the Granada. "With salsa I had to think about what I was doing," she says. "With bachata it just flowed ... the music kind of tells you how to move."

    The catchy musicality and languid, steady beat are also part of bachata's appeal. "I think personally it's a great way — if you're not a rhythm person — to really learn to have rhythm," Miller says.

    But even though bachata is a bit slower and less technical than salsa, that doesn't mean it's less satisfying for advanced dancers. Experienced bachateros can add flair to their footwork and body action. Starting in October, the Granada will offer an intermediate bachata class concurrently with its beginner class for those seeking more complexity.

    Plus, there are multiple styles to master. Classic Dominican bachata from the 1960s has developed into variations known as modern bachata and urban bachata, which incorporates elements of hip-hop. The urban strain is part of what attracts a comparatively younger crowd to the Granada's bachata nights. Guys show up in jeans and Vans, while many of the women sport tight dresses and treacherous stilettos.

    "Because it's not so much spinning and patterns," says Brigitte Ryerson, who teaches bachata at the Granada with her partner Hector Llamas, "the girls can wear shorter skirts and higher heels."

    At least for the time being. As more and more salseros embrace bachata and import their penchant for spins and tricks, Ryerson worries the dance could take, well, a turn for the worse. "Salsa's great," she says, but she'd like to see bachata maintain its uniqueness. "I hope it doesn't turn into the next salsa."

    [email protected]
    Copyright © 2011, Los Angeles Times

    Bachata - latimes.com







    One Dominican at a time please!

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    One Dominican at a time please!

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    the lambada was also popular, for a fleeting moment. the thing with salsa is that, as a music, you can either dance to it, or just listen to it. in many cases , it is played by master musicians, like Tito Puente, and the Fania All Stars, and produces songs which will last forever. bachata is nice to dance to, but there are no songs that i have heard by any of the so called powerhouses , that i need to hear more than once. they all sound the same, and, although they are nice and catchy today, they will be trivia questions ten years down the road.

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    Default WoW!?! Bachata & Salsa is like oil & water.

    I remember begging the DJ to play just one Bachata song at Veinte Veinte in lower manhattan and when he did, everybody was off the dance floor. I remember a dance floor full of Bachateros at this club on Dyckman and when they played Salsa, the dance floor parted like the red sea! I remember the Copa would only play a few bachata songs, so Salseros could go to the bathroom and get drinks.

    In matter of fact, I never seen the words "BACHATA" in big letters on a flyer, ahahahaha. Well anyway good for them! I seriously doubt that I will see that in NYC, but who knows anything is possible.

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    Salsa has been dying a slow death for the last 10 years or so already...
    The last time it gained some popularity was with Marc's hit songs, but now he's just doing pretty much nothing of material as of late.

    Bachata? Think Aventura hitting the block since 1995 and still burns the radio and dance floors, and that's over 16 years!

    Salsa is ballroom music nowadays everywhere you go... Anything with more than 3 steps and a side hip roll, kids won't dance to it... If you ever visit the NYC clubs you can see the old crow to the beat of Salsa and the young to Bachata and Hip music...

    Salsa is a music genre that got too generic too soon, never allowing for evolution to infiltrate it. Try clubbing in Puerto Rico, Panama, Medellin, Bogota and expecting to Salsa all night there... You'll be greatly out of the in-crowd super fast! Puerto Rico beats more to Bachata and Merengue than even Dominican clubs do! And that's the "Cuna" of Salsa and the Fania kids...

    Bachata has been expanding over the horizon for over two decades non-stop and the evolution from "Pena" times is very hard to compare with the Bachata played today around the world.

    No wonder genre like Jazz never go away and stick strong, since if you can walk and tilt, you sure can dance to it. Bachata is way to easy to pick up and once you understand the words behind the beat, the better it gets. Bachata is passion mixed-in with music that entices your body to follow it as you desire to do it, or as you body "feels" like doing it. You can be erotic, or candid. You can be happy or sad. Not ever since Rock'n Roll has a music genre pulled so many people that don't even understand the words, but can follow the music as if it was their national anthem to dance to.

    You have to understand that Bachata was born where souls went to soak their pain, love and broken hearts each night...

    The first public Bachata to make it to Radio in the DR after Trujillo's death:

    <object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/epX9fDiasTw?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/epX9fDiasTw?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>



    His lead was follow by others like Rafael Encarnacion
    <object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Dbj3cOmL82Y?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Dbj3cOmL82Y?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>

    Ramoncito Cabrera El Chivo Sin Ley
    <object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/tEHyKa0fkm0?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/tEHyKa0fkm0?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>

    Antonio Gómez Salcero
    <object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/g_ctJb9V3aY?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/g_ctJb9V3aY?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>

    Luis Segura
    <object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/hy5Ip2pf4Js?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/hy5Ip2pf4Js?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>


    RAMON CORDERO
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    The came:



    Leonardo Paniagua
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    Blas Durán
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    The came...

    Luis Vargas
    <object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Tm0yX_gxEJU?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Tm0yX_gxEJU?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>




    Hé Pepo
    <object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/EHII3H5CUB8?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/EHII3H5CUB8?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>


    Antony Santos
    <object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/JC4vtlrRvho?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/JC4vtlrRvho?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>

    Raulin Rodriguez
    <object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/5wirI7FlO-Q?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/5wirI7FlO-Q?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>


    Then...


    1995 to Present:

    Aventura
    <object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/a6_E2icvu3s?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/a6_E2icvu3s?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>

    And the present is like wild fire around the world!!


    Even Japan!


    <object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/5E87B3t9cnY?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/5E87B3t9cnY?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="360"></object>
    One Dominican at a time please!

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    Now compare that to what you call Salsa since the 1970's *as many people don't even know that it was started on the streets of Spanish Harlem... "El Barrio" by Boricuas and a Cuban minority... Prior to 1970 what they played in clubs and dance halls was a mix of afro-cuban music unlike the "Salsa" today you can recognize by the ear...

    Bachata is Bachata no matter how long a time ago it started and how much it evolved today, you can find that old Bachata is present 100% on today's Bachata with ease. Just as it was danced in the late 50's and early 60's it has not change much in the soul department, unlike Salsa... Try to dance to Marc hits and see what I mean...

    Now go try that with ANY Bachata hit or unknown song and see the flow unchanged, even when the evolution is clear to hear and almost touch...

    Why change a good thing?
    One Dominican at a time please!

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    Quote Originally Posted by PICHARDO View Post
    Now compare that to what you call Salsa since the 1970's *as many people don't even know that it was started on the streets of Spanish Harlem... "El Barrio" by Boricuas and a Cuban minority... Prior to 1970 what they played in clubs and dance halls was a mix of afro-cuban music unlike the "Salsa" today you can recognize by the ear...

    Bachata is Bachata no matter how long a time ago it started and how much it evolved today, you can find that old Bachata is present 100% on today's Bachata with ease. Just as it was danced in the late 50's and early 60's it has not change much in the soul department, unlike Salsa... Try to dance to Marc hits and see what I mean...

    Now go try that with ANY Bachata hit or unknown song and see the flow unchanged, even when the evolution is clear to hear and almost touch...

    Why change a good thing?
    not since rock and roll? really? i beg to differ. i give that place to the reggae, and its offsprings, be they reggaeton, or dancehall. as i said, Aventura has been around since 1995, and i have not heard one song they have done which makes me stand up and take notice. nothing like the stuff from Tito Puente, or Willie Colon, or Celia Cruz, which is still freash 20 years after they made it.

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    I can stand very little bachata for some unknown reason, maybe because I hear it too much. There are a few songs of course and the odd artist (or ex) like Monchy y Alexandra and some of Aventura's stuff and even the Bachata in the form of "musica tipica" isn't so bad.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip View Post
    I can stand very little bachata for some unknown reason, maybe because I hear it too much. There are a few songs of course and the odd artist (or ex) like Monchy y Alexandra and some of Aventura's stuff and even the Bachata in the form of "musica tipica" isn't so bad.

    maybe you think you hear it too much because it all sounds the same. same instruments, same guitar riffs, same conga drum rolls, identical bass line. nice to dance to, pointless to listen to.

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    When I left Panama in 2000 I had never heard of Bachata, they were not playing it in Panama either. My friends in Holland (Antilleans from Curacao) were playing it all the time and introduced me to it. The Dominican chicas brought it with them when they went to "work" in Campo Alegre in Curacao. In 2003 when I returned to Panama every cab driver was playing it. Besides chicas it's another export product of the DR

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