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Thread: about haitians in the dr

  1. #1
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    Default about haitians in the dr

    one of the main reasons that there are so many haitians in the
    DR is that the government itself is employing them

    you can see it right in las terrenas .. behind the ministry of tourism signs,, it is Haitians who are doing all the work for the sidewalk construction. They are paid 30 pesos a meter

    some days they earn as much as 500 pesos

    in constanza .. the haitians do all the crop dusting and planting.. in heavy chemicals with no face protection

    they are paid 300 pesos a day

    the lovely cartel road is now from las terrenas to santo domingo.. punta cana to santo domingo-- santo dominigo to constanza and santo domingo to pedernales

    they only have to turn on a few lights and they will be operational

    it is planned as a six lane highway

    i am embedded with the dominican army and feel quite safe

    but i will not be truely safe until this story breaks in english in the international press.. try agence france,which may be able to get it to reuters

    us media is corporate controlled and there are many us companies involved

    thanks all!!

    my che guevara t shirt is still holding up!!

    hugs

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    The excuse of "Domnicans" won't do this type of work is bogus just like the claims in the US. The facts are that citizens want to be paid a fair wage and be treated fairly. The rich people of every country want illegal immigration for cheap labor with limited rights and they hide behind altruism. I think that if they paid $600 pesos a day with proper equipment they would get Dominican workers but that would cut into their profits. Those big government projects are contracted out.

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    Santiaguero; dang!!! Hiding behind altruism, for their cheap labor...I could not have said it better.
    @ Annie, you can put "that" shirt away. He just murdered people.

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    I don't have a problem with illegals whether here or in the States to a point. The point being where their numbers have adverse effects. That is subjective for sure.

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  6. #5
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    Wow, two threads in "Let's blame Haitians for all our woes" mode.

    As was said in earlier threads, you really can substitute "Haitian" for "Mexican" and "DR" for "American," and these threads sound like a typical night on Fox News.

    So far, my favorite comments have been of the "I'm not racist because I married/have a relationship with/randomly screw a Dominican, but I really hate Haitians, especially the ones who are as black as the blacks I hated back home. But I'm not a racist." lol.

    That said, I'm African-American, and hate Haitians as well. That dark skin is just so...ooky.

    Anyway, I'd happily challenge any person on this blog to find a Dominican (or even better, a know-it-all expat) to work 12+ hours a day, 6+ days a week on a years-long construction project for 300 pesos (about 8 bux) a day.

    It's like finding white folks who complain that immigrants take all the jobs, despite the fact they have no interest whatsoever in picking grapes or melons from sun up to sundown. It's all about the principal, right.

    Here comes the part where some expat talks about how hard he worked in his first world country and how he used his brain instead of his head, and now can sit and complain about other people willing to do hard work.

    The simple fact is most countries - including the DR - are utterly reliant on cheap labor to operate. Yes, being illegal is less preferable to legal, and yes, the rule of law should be obeyed. But let's not act like the vast majority of illegals work jobs no one wants to work and spend money in our struggling economies to a greater extent than they extract services. After all, lest we forget, most came to work.

    I mean, If I were seeking better benefits and more respect, I'd keep on walking to Canada if I were an illegal. But that's me.

    At least until your meal goes up dramatically, or the costs of buying/managing your hours increases, or a million other things that you come to rely on suddenly jumps in price because you're so durned principled.

    Then, I imagine we'll start to complain over corporate greed, or taxes, or whatever.

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    I think DRob has a valid point. It is once again the same in every country.

    A lot of my uncles are fruit- and vegetable farmers in Belgium. Every crop they have to depend on a lot of seasonal workers. For years they used hindu and pakistani "illegals" who used to show up when crops were ready to be picked. They paid them the official minimum wage in Belgium, and on top of this they got 3 free, good meals a day, as well as a bed, and all other facilities. As soon as the crop was finished, they would move on to France, Spain, or whereever. They never had any complaints of those workers. They were honest, were willing to work long hours if the crop needed picking (they were paid by the hour), and were always happy and content. It were always the same ones who showed up when necessary, so they were even included in family festivities, etc...

    The government did not like this, held raids, and most of my uncles got big fines. So far, so good. One uncle decided to give it a test. He went to the unemployment office and told them he needed 30 workers for a 6 week period. He paid quite a bit more over the minimum wage, as now he could bring it into his expenses. He promised them a bonus if they got the crop picked in time. He offered them the same lodgings, and meals, or offered to pay more if they only came to work and had lunch.

    It was a disaster. He started with 30, ended up with 10 after the first day. Got 20 new ones the next day, and still ended up with 10 at the end of the day. They found the work too hard, too boring, too many hours, etc...

    It is exactly the same here. Now they bitch because the haitians are here, but they forget the fact that they were more than happy that those haitians were here to cut down the sugar cane.

    Stop judging someone by his origin, or color, and judge someone by his diligence, honesty, etc...

    Do the German system... you can be legal for a year, providing you have work, learn the lingo, and adapt yourself. After a year you are evaluated.

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    I wonder why so many have to go to an extreme on this board to make and example?

    For example, like in this thread someone can be for Haitian illegal immigration up to a certain point, yet someone will come along and states they are a racist for not allowing all the Haitians who want to to come to the DR?

    This is a common theme throughout this board and it assumes there is no such thing apparently as a "middle ground".

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  12. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SantiagueroRD View Post
    The excuse of "Domnicans" won't do this type of work is bogus just like the claims in the US. The facts are that citizens want to be paid a fair wage and be treated fairly. The rich people of every country want illegal immigration for cheap labor with limited rights and they hide behind altruism. I think that if they paid $600 pesos a day with proper equipment they would get Dominican workers but that would cut into their profits. Those big government projects are contracted out.
    Everything minus the bolded part I completely agree and have been saying this for years now.

    Now, about the resentment towards "the rich," it would actually make sense -at least in the Dominican case- if most employees worked for large Dominican companies.

    But I'll let you do your own research and then I hope you come here and share your findings with everyone. When you do your research, make sure you identify not just the type of companies that employ most of the workforce, but also their capitalization and productivity levels.

    My guess is that you will be very surprised to find out that the companies owned by "the rich" have very little impact on the prevailing wage levels. If anything, those are the companies that most often pay above average wages and, as a group, employ the least amount of Haitian workers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    Everything minus the bolded part I completely agree and have been saying this for years now.

    Now, about the resentment towards "the rich," it would actually make sense -at least in the Dominican case- if most employees worked for large Dominican companies.

    But I'll let you do your own research and then I hope you come here and share your findings with everyone. When you do your research, make sure you identify not just the type of companies that employ most of the workforce, but also their capitalization and productivity levels.

    My guess is that you will be very surprised to find out that the companies owned by "the rich" have very little impact on the prevailing wage levels. If anything, those are the companies that most often pay above average wages and, as a group, employ the least amount of Haitian workers.
    You have a good point and most illegals are employed informally and not by big business...but there is also a history of large scale organized use...obviously in the DR with bateys and cane production and some of the richest families in the country...or in the US with large scale agribusiness. The present circumstances in the DR with a flood of Haitian illegals and a shrunken sugar industry is obviously not the historical norm.

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    I wish all you ultra-leftists, civil rights wannabe's who wished they marched with Dr. King and fought with and died romantically in Bolivia with Che Guevara would uproot yourselfs again and move some 400 miles west with the mega-cheap imported labor. The Dominican government hires these people and I'm sure you have a big cool aid smile. Awwww poor Dominicans are getting screwed but it's ok, because a poor imigrant is taking his job" Go back to your commie Europe and eat some crepes.

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