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  1. #1
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    Default what should I do when I retire there....?

    My plan is to retire in the DR in a few years...in the North near Villa Gonzales or Navarette... where I know some people... but what can I do? should I open a colmado? a bar? I should be ok money-wise, but an income , a small business, might help,.. any ideas ...? somethign simple... not involving anything too strenuous, even something charitable would work for me with no recompense.. I just want to fill my days somehow....

  2. #2
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    Lend money on low rate...but Navarete...not the best city to retire, one of the most violent cities in the country

    T.E.

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  4. #3
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    you have to be kidding me........ I spend most odf my time in El Limon, but we go to navarette to shop....
    Quote Originally Posted by The Exterminator View Post
    Lend money on low rate...but Navarete...not the best city to retire, one of the most violent cities in the country

    T.E.

  5. #4
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    "Amstel" I don't remember if you are a"Dominicano" or not?
    If you are,and want to return to your "Roots" you may be "OK",and enjoy the "Campo"/"Barrio" Life.
    It you are a "Gringo",then you will forever remain a "Gringo" no matter where you live,what you wear,and how much "salami" you eat.
    Moving to the DR,to enjoy the "Simple Life",in the "Third World,is a "Pie-In-The-Sky" dream of many from the "First World".
    In some cases,that "Dream",soon becomes a "nightmare"!
    Being short on the "dinero" side makes life difficult in both of the above "scenarios".
    Good Luck with your future here in the DR.
    "Money,not only "Talks" here,it "Yells"!
    Cris Colon

  6. #5
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    Dont mean to semi highjack, but is a Colmado a good money making business here and if so are we talking good or modest living. I know it depends on the biz as always just curious in general

  7. #6
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    EXpat,your question will get a LOT more attention in another forum.
    CC

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  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Criss Colon View Post
    EXpat,your question will get a LOT more attention in another forum.
    CC
    ok, got it

  10. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Expat13 View Post
    Dont mean to semi highjack, but is a Colmado a good money making business here and if so are we talking good or modest living. I know it depends on the biz as always just curious in general
    I had the equivalent of a colmado in a village of about 500 in the Pacific Islands. I made a modest, but very reliable income on it, which would have been an above average income by local standards. It was only 8'x12' and even then, I was grossing US$2000+ a week with a 15%-20% mark-up. You'd have to do some footwork to get a good location and you might need to be your own distributor by making town runs.

    In the DR, you would do well by buying dry goods in bulk and then using a reliable scale to sell many things in smaller units. The thing that would drive me nuts in the DR would be people wanting to 5 pesos worth of Corn Flakes or Tomato Paste.

    Alternatively, you might be able to work the plastic "Jobber" strip market. This is where you work as an independent distributor who sells goods on "jobber" strips and other impulse buys. You see jobber strips all the time that have a dozen of some handy item or cheap toy on them. At one place I worked for, we did well selling lighters, car air fresheners, cheap toys, candy on strips(like lolipops), toy cars, hair ties, Alka-Seltzer, etc, etc, etc. We'd get toy "matchbox" cars in boxes of 20 for $6, wholesale them for $10 a box, and then they'd retail for $20 when sold one at a time. Basically, you buy in bulk from some 20 y 40 and then sell by the dozen to small shops.

    This is what I mean by a jobber strip. Stores often use independent marketers to sell them to them full of items, a few strips at a time:



    You can make your own jobber strips by tying a bunch of clothes pins to lengths of string.

  11. #9
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    If you have enough money to live on, than don't put your money in a grocery store. It is a business with long hours and a lot of headaches. Also if you do not have a least temporary residency, I believe, you will not be able to open a business in your name. If you like to work long hours, worry about employees and customers ripping you off, vendors who short change you than by all means pursue your dream.

    LTS

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  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by LTSteve View Post
    If you have enough money to live on, than don't put your money in a grocery store. It is a business with long hours and a lot of headaches. Also if you do not have a least temporary residency, I believe, you will not be able to open a business in your name. If you like to work long hours, worry about employees and customers ripping you off, vendors who short change you than by all means pursue your dream.
    LTS
    Not to mention that many colmados operate on credit--the customers need credit, want credit, and will beg for credit. and then you have the headache of chasing them down to pay their bill. mind you, these are good people, friendly people, that are just trying to make it; they're scarsely getting by by a shoe-string budget. do you really want to be that guy chasing people--who only make $40 a week--down for money?

    Not me. not in a million years. most of the people shopping at colmados are just barely getting by and the children come in hungry and looking at chocolate and bread they cannot afford, only to purchase a lottery ticket for their mom and dad trying to strike it rich.

    In no time at all you'll feel like the Grinch who Stole Christmas.

    It takes a very strong stomach to be in the colmado business in a third world country. you're surrounded by deep poverty and friendly people who have never tasted a Snicker's bar. The Haitians are friendly, the dominicans are friendly, the children are adorable, and you'll be sitting behind your counter watching people eye things that they have no way of paying for.

    No thank you.

    Frank

  14. Likes fidget, snoozer, wuarhat, Softail, CaptnGlenn and 5 others liked this post
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