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  1. #1
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    Default President Medina "Cops A Plea"...Blames "IMF" For Dominican "Electricity Problem"!

    In TRUE Dominican Form, President of the DR, Danilo Medina says,"No Es Nuestra Culpa" (It's NOT OUR FAULT)
    He blames the International Monetary Fund(Owed more than a billion dollars by the DR!) for the problem.
    He says that the "IMF" thinks the problem of "shortfall in payments for electricity produced each month should be reduced.
    "Duh!"
    Guess he skipped "Economics 101"

    You know, where they teach that producers should expect to be paid for their products or services.
    The "IMF" is no "Angel", but "Gimmy A Break!"
    Looks like "Same Ol', Same Ol'" from the DR Government!
    "God Help Us!
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    See DR1 Daily News for the whole pathetic story.

  2. #2
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    Yup

    More from today's DR1 News [you should all read it every day!!]

    Medina blames IMF for electricity crisis


    President Danilo Medina says that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) is "fundamentally responsible" for the financial crisis that affects the Dominican electricity sector, because the specialists from the multilateral financial agency have always believed that the energy problem could be resolved by increasing collections, addressing the technical losses and reducing energy theft.

    Medina said that the issues go far beyond these problems. He said that "there are interests in the electricity sector that need to be dealt with. We cannot continue with the current model. We have to deal with it and we will do this through an electricity pact just as we will do with education."

    His comments, made after he left the meeting of the Economic and Social Council when he presented the fiscal pact, are now being reported by the press. Medina said that nobody could increase collections with a magic wand. According to data from the electricity sector, the distributors (Edes) purchase US$190 million in electricity each month but only collect US$120 million from consumers, of which US$35 million have to go towards administrative expenses. This creates an annual shortfall of US$1.2 billion. He added that the problem was not the fault of Celso Marranzini, Cesar Sanchez or any of the other heads of the CDEEE. He said it was structural and they will have to deal with it.

    Danilo afirma hay que revisar la estructura del negocio eléctrico - ElDia.com.do

    Administrator
    DR1.com

  3. Likes Criss Colon liked this post
  4. #3
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    "US$ 35 million in administrative expenses" every month seems a bit too much. I would love to see that number broken down into categories...

  5. Likes AlterEgo, Conchman, frank12 liked this post
  6. #4
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    "Leonel's brother was on the EEDESUR payroll for $2,000 US a month years ago.
    AND, he lived in New York City at the time!
    You do the math!
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  7. Likes frank12 liked this post
  8. #5
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    As I read Listin diario this morning, I could not beleive he said that.

  9. #6
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    Come on, it is easy to do the math...

    Average Edenorte office.... around 10 girls sitting on their ass, calling their boyfriends. 2 of them will actually be doing something. One of them is the one trained in saying "no" to any complaint, the other one is very good at collecting bills.

    The average time of dealing with a simple complaint is 45 minutes. This is the client trying to make a valid point for 43 minutes, and the "no" girl repeating the same word over and over for the remaining 2 minutes.

    We have friends here, who actually want to pay their fair share of electricity used, after they bought their house. They were told by Edenorte that they were outside of the grid, and they could not be bothered to install a meter at their house. So they have been getting free luz for over 2 years now, as is the barrio (and this consists of several hundred houses) behind them. Why not charge all of those people a fixed amount per month????

    We know people on a large finca, who use a hell of a lot of electricity. Air, pool, several freezers, several fridges, high watt security lights at night, several workers who live on the property also use luz, and they pay 1,000 rds per month.

    When we arrived in Jarabacoa, 3 years ago, we rented a house. The landlord told us to pay 1,000 rds per month for luz. I thought this was a good deal, until I discovered he never paid it to the electric company, and they shut us off. I went to the company and got myself the same contract, for 580 rds per month.

    I have no problem paying for luz... but hey... the majority of the locals here pay nothing, or a fraction of what they use.

    And it is easy to correct... Same rules for all people... You do not pay, you get no luz...

    BelgianK

  10. Likes Conchman, caribmike, frank12 liked this post
  11. #7
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    The IMF should be partially blamed for this fiasco.

    Why do they insist on continuing to lend the DR money? They know the government is corrupt.
    They know very well the problem with the electrical companies. They should know very well of all the problems in DR.
    So, why do they do it?

    Before Danilo took office, the IMF had $158 mil waiting for him. Why?

    When the US housing market crashed, the bankers were blamed for making the bad loans, deservingly so.
    I don't see a difference here.


  12. #8
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    It all comes down to the rule of law. if you dont have that, everything else false apart, including electricity collections.

  13. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conchman View Post
    It all comes down to the rule of law. if you dont have that, everything else false apart, including electricity collections.
    You got it! but as you know, there is no rule of law in DR.

    Here is the problem.. A lot of people want to treat electricity as an entitlement.

    A lot more, are simply taking advantage of it. They could rationalize it as follows: Hey, if the big people don't pay electricity, why should we?

    As dumbfounded as it might sound, one could see their rational.

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  15. #10
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    The country really needs some mano dura.

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