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  1. #1
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    Default When, Where and how to Bribe a Dominican Policeman?

    Quote Originally Posted by La Rubia View Post
    Would be fun to start a new thread, when, where and how to bribe a Dominican policeman?
    Let's see, you think you should lie to a policemen to force someone who may or may not have stolen from you to pay a bigger bribe to that policeman?
    Your wish is my command

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  3. #2
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    How about when you get a speeding ticket.Just give him lunch money.

    Like the saying goes.....When in Rome.....

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOMINCAN JOE View Post
    Your wish is my command
    Music to my ears, music to my ears!

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  6. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bronzeallspice View Post
    How about when you get a speeding ticket.Just give him lunch money.
    I think this is the approach for the average joe on the street, helping out a guy who may be more inclined to help you out because of it. After all, realistically they aren't paid enough to resist. That small stuff is much different than paying off an immigration guy the other way as you smuggle out drugs, for example.

    I kind of bristle when I hear gringos say policeman are corrupt, and think that they can just bribe themselves out of any situation with a random police officer. Kind of like saying all women are whores, as you are paying her for her service.

    I also, don't like the word bribe, so distasteful. Definitely an art to be mastered.

  7. #5
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    Offer sufficiently more than what the thief can fence the stolen property for.

  8. #6
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    Be happy you got your ID back.

  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derfish View Post
    In Panama they ask for a blessing, una bendicion.
    Der Fish

    ah, yes. i see where Caribe Tours drivers have gotten into the bendicion business. once the bus leaves the main terminals, no need to buy tickets anymore. so, when they stop in places like Cabrera, just give the driver his blessing, and you are on your way.

  10. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by gjfatkri View Post
    Be happy you got your ID back.
    I think this suppose to go here http://www.dr1.com/forums/living/130...situation.html

  11. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by La Rubia View Post
    I think this is the approach for the average joe on the street, helping out a guy who may be more inclined to help you out because of it. After all, realistically they aren't paid enough to resist. That small stuff is much different than paying off an immigration guy the other way as you smuggle out drugs, for example.

    I kind of bristle when I hear gringos say policeman are corrupt, and think that they can just bribe themselves out of any situation with a random police officer. Kind of like saying all women are whores, as you are paying her for her service.

    I also, don't like the word bribe, so distasteful. Definitely an art to be mastered.
    Not all, but most policemen are corrupt, and yes, a gringo can bribe themselves out of almost anything.

    If the stop is random, and nothing happened to cause the stop, then a bribe is in the making. I have never been stopped for a legitimate reason by AMET or National Police (with the exception of one seat belt ticket, which I paid in full), but I have been stopped by members of each force to delay my progress until pesos appeared to solve the problem.

  12. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOMINCAN JOE View Post
    Your wish is my command
    I've used this method in Haiti. It works great. The text is from Marc Vachon (a fellow logistician), entitled "Rebel Without Borders" he writes about his time trying to get supplies into a cholera camp in Goma, DRC. The book is great:

    We reached the camp 24 hours later. As we’d arrived without authorization, the camp logistician negotiated with local authorities to let us stay. That wasn’t my job; my task was to deal with the cholera outbreak. But, three hours went by, and we still hadn’t made any progress. I went over to see the head customs officer.

    “What’s the problem?”
    “Boss, the problem is that you don’t have the papers and it’s
    not right . . .”

    I’d like some baksheesh! was written all over his face. This was Zaire. There were deep-rooted customs no one could circumvent, not even a relief delegation.

    “I agree, chief. If I were you, I’d insist on a fine . . .”
    “Really?”

    The look on his face said, This makes sense. He’s talking about money!

    “Of course. In Canada, there’d be a fine of $250 per truck and $50 per car for the infraction. It would amount to $1,650 for a 48-hour pass to enter the country and unload the material.”

    “Well, boss, it seems like a pretty good idea.”

    He flushed. He could almost feel the weight of the cash in his pockets.

    Of course, this didn’t sit well with the logistician. He had hoped a little speech would do the trick: “We’re the good guys, we’re helping you and your brothers. How could you even think of shaking us down?” He was naive.

    The Zairian customs officer didn’t give a flying **** about Rwandan refugees. The law of the Third World is “Every man for himself and God for him, too.” After all, hadn’t we committed an infraction? We weren’t going
    to spend days negotiating. There was an emergency on the other side of the border.

    _______________

    So I tend to say that in X country the solution is for a fine to be imposed at the spot, and isn't it such an elegant solution? Then you have to negotiate what would be an appropriate and not an outrageous fine for whatever infraction has been committed.

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