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Thread: Dying Bees

  1. #1
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    Default Dying Bees

    We have a few citrus trees that have been blooming. We had some at the other house, too, and we always enjoyed how the hney bees would frolick doing their pollenation thing.

    But the last few days the bees are dying. They are all over the ground in their death throes.

    We've obviously done nothing, but are surrounded by large lots which are planted with different crops.

    Just wondering if anyone had any insight to bee behavior. I know about collapsed hive syndrom but never experienced it.

    BTW: why do dogs like eating these bees and not other insects? Mine go nutso eating them out of the sky like me after flying beef jerky...

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    I would assume that you have not sprayed your trees, but perhaps the neighboring fields have been sprayed? Bees are hardy insects so this is serious. Have you looked at them--before the dogs eat them? Are there any whitish spots on them?

    A world without bees is not a good thing. Did you know that the words for bees and honey are one of the major sources of linguistic studies as to migration and origins of languages??

    HB

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    Coincidentally, today's NY Times has an article about this. Not DR study but might give some insight:

    <nyt_headline version="1.0" type=" ">Study Finds No Single Cause of Honeybee Deaths</nyt_headline>


    WASHINGTON — The devastation of American honeybee colonies is the result of a complex stew of factors, including pesticides, parasites, poor nutrition and a lack of genetic diversity, according to a comprehensive federal study published on Thursday. The problems affect pollination of American agricultural products worth tens of billions of dollars a year.

    The report does not place more weight on one factor over another, and recommends a range of actions and further research.
    Honeybees are used to pollinate hundreds of crops, from almonds to strawberries to soybeans. Since 2006, millions of bees have been dying in a phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder. The cause or causes have been the subject of much study and speculation.
    The federal report appears the same week that European officials took steps toward banning a class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, derived from nicotine, that they consider a critical factor in the mass deaths of bees there.
    But officials in the United States Department of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Agency and others involved in the bee study said that there was not enough evidence to support a ban on one group of pesticides, and that the costs of such action might exceed the benefits.
    “At E.P.A. we let science drive the outcome of decision making,” said Jim Jones, the agency’s acting assistant administrator for chemical safety and pollution prevention. “There are non-trivial costs to society if we get this wrong. There are meaningful benefits from these pesticides to farmers and to consumers, as well as for affordable food.”
    May R. Berenbaum, head of the department of entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a participant in the study, said that examination of dead bees had found residues of more than 100 chemicals, insecticides and pesticides, including some used to control parasites in bee hives.
    Like Mr. Jones, she rejected the idea of an immediate ban on the use of neonicotinoids or any other single pesticide.
    “It’s not a simple matter of just removing pesticides,” she said in a conference call for reporters Thursday. “It is difficult to predict the effect of removing one of 100 different contaminants.”
    “There is no quick fix,” she said. “Patching one hole in a boat that leaks everywhere is not going to keep it from sinking.”
    One of the most fatal afflictions in bee colonies is the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, which infests beehives and is thought to be responsible for numerous die-offs. Another factor is the planting of vast areas in a single crop like corn, limiting the forage supplies for bees.
    Zac Browning, a fourth-generation commercial beekeeper who operates more than 20,000 hives for honey production and pollination in California, Idaho and North Dakota, said the solution to the bee crisis will require a broad approach and many players.
    He said that the supply of bees is falling short of the need, citing difficulty rounding up enough bees to pollinate the winter almond crop in California and blueberry bushes in Maine this spring.
    “We’re on the brink,” he said. “I don’t know if we’ve crossed that threshold yet, but we’re getting there fast.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/03/science/earth/government-study-cites-mix-of-factors-in-death-of-honeybees.html?smid=fb-nytimes&WT.z_sma=SC_SFN_20130503





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    They are Dominican "Drones" killing themselves after finding out that their Reyna" has been having an affair with a grasshopper.
    cccccc

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    Talk about one thing that could limit the population in a very short period of time. No need to hit 10 Billion before other limits kick in if the honeybees continue do die.

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    Just across the road from our house and down a bit, a friend of Mr AE's has a small finca. He has rented out a portion of it to someone who has placed a LOT of beehives there. They take the honey out in 55 gallon drums.

    With all our avocado and mango trees flowering at the same time while we were there, we were treated to a daily non-stop visit of many of the bees all over our property.




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    "Carrying Out Your "Honey" in a 55 gallon drum"?????????
    You may have just solved my marriage problems!
    CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

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    Bee population in North America is threatened by a mite infestation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Criss Colon View Post
    They are Dominican "Drones" killing themselves after finding out that their Reyna" has been having an affair with a grasshopper.
    cccccc
    Hence you get Dominican "amargue."

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    Quote Originally Posted by cobraboy View Post
    BTW: why do dogs like eating these bees and not other insects? Mine go nutso eating them out of the sky like me after flying beef jerky...

    Make sure he is actually going after the bees. There is a neurological condition in dogs known as "fly snapping syndrome" that is far more common than you might think.
    P.S. I keep a wide berth of any dogs who are suffering from this as you can well imagine.

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